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What is continuous power rating ?

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by deaf cat, Jun 27, 2005.

  1. deaf cat

    deaf cat
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    Hiya,

    Hope you can help, speakers with :

    Continuous power handling of 150Watts
    Max Power Output 200Watts


    This, continuous power rating, seems a bit high to be the RMS (roughly 132Watts rms - 2/3rds of 200?) any one know what this continuous power is exactly ? :rolleyes:

    Cheers
     
  2. Reiner

    Reiner
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    Continues power rating is the power that can be applied continuously. Aeh, well ... :suicide:

    Actually the figure is close enough to the RMS that it probably is the RMS value, but to know for sure you would need to know how / under what conditions the manufacturer has measured that value.
     
  3. Drone Cone

    Drone Cone
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    I was told by a well know speaker company that continuous power should be tested with Pink Noise for 8 hours without coil failure (or distortion)!!!.
     
  4. deaf cat

    deaf cat
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    Cheers for the comments, but what is Pink Noise...

    I think I may well go deaf, as well as me poor cat if its blasted for 8 hours at 150 watts - but its nice to know they can handle a good hammering.
     
  5. Harry T2

    Harry T2
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    Pink noise is a variation of white noise. White noise is a sound that contains every frequency in the range of (generally) 20Hz to 20kHz.

    Pink noise makes allowances at every octave by reducing the sound pressure level by 6dB. The result is that each sound wave has equal energy.

    (I think)
     
  6. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    This is white noise where each individual frequency has equal energy.

    In pink noise this white noise is filtered (as you describe) such that each octave has equal energy. :)
     
  7. Harry T2

    Harry T2
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    Thanks for the correction.

    Too many years since I had to recall that bit of info is my excuse.
     
  8. deaf cat

    deaf cat
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    So its quite an intensive test then.

    Nice to have something explained and know the speakers have been tested to such standards.

    Thanks again.

    So a good combination would, be an amp rated to 150watts THD 0.1% or there abouts.........
     
  9. inzaman

    inzaman
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    Also can you have an amp or amps in biamp configuration above the maximum power handling if you are not intending to run at full volume? Would this damage the speakers in any way?
     
  10. Harry T2

    Harry T2
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    You can always have a more powerful rated amp with lesser power rated speaker, in the same way you can have a less powerful amp with a higher power rated speaker.

    No damage will occur, provided that the "not at full volume" is less than the power rating of the speaker. In fact, most speakers will gladly handle additional power, provided that the signal is clean and free from clipping. Which is more likely to occur if a less powerful amp is driven too hard.
     
  11. inzaman

    inzaman
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    Thanks for the response, that makes my upgrade path a bit clearer now :)
     

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