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What is biwiring?

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by RedRose, Nov 19, 2002.

  1. RedRose

    RedRose
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    I'd never heard of this before I joined this forum. Anyone give me a quick description + benefits?
    Thanks.
     
  2. kevenh

    kevenh
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    when you biwire you run two pairs of cables from your amp to a suitable speaker (i.e. one with two pairs of binding posts*).

    You end up with the treble and mid range speaker(s) getting a direct connection to the amp, and the bass speaker getting it's own seperate direct connection to the amp.

    It removes the speaker's crossover circuit from all or most of it's job.


    * - usually need to remove a metal jumper connection between the two pairs of connections for biwiring to work (and the removal of this bit of metal is what some here at avforum believe is the biggest improvment (I'm undecided)).
     
  3. bob007

    bob007
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    Bi-Wiring:

    Normally two runs of wires are used to connect each speaker to the amp.

    Speakers that can be Bi-Wired have 4xterminals, +/- for the bass/mid range and +/- for the highs (tweeter/s)

    As for the benefits, some say there is a difference to be heard, some say there isn't. IMO you are probably better of using better quality speaker wire instead of the cheaper jumpers that are normally supplied.

    Jumpers are the small plates that connect the +/+ and -/- terminals together if you are not Bi-Wiring.
     
  4. Nic Rhodes

    Nic Rhodes
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    It doesn't, the cross over is still in circuit it is just the HF and LF bit are separated in the speaker but joined at the amp rather than joined in the speaker!

    Beware of the claims made in this area, based on salespeak for getting more money from you. Buyer beware.
     
  5. kevenh

    kevenh
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    Ooops! What I meant wasn't what I wrote. I meant removing load from the crossover or 'current returns' as descibed by Castle Accoustics below: -

    "A bi-wire crossover separates treble and bass 'legs' of the crossover network isolating the treble signal from the potential modulation distortions from high energy current returns in the bass section."
     
  6. Nic Rhodes

    Nic Rhodes
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    ;)

    issolated in the speaker but still gets modulated at the amplifier end where they are connected! :devil:
     
  7. Brad_Porter

    Brad_Porter
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    :D - You just had to add that in right?
     
  8. RedRose

    RedRose
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    Thanks guys.
    It sounds like a technique for people with REALLY good hearing. I once tried using solid core 30amp mains cable to my speakers (the signal travels over the outside of the wire etc.) but could not hear a difference in "normal" conditions. At least I know what's being talked about ;)
     
  9. NicolasB

    NicolasB
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    The more I think about bi-wiring, the more skeptical I am about it. Unless you you can somehow arrange for there to be no direct electrical connection between two separate pairs of binding posts at the amplifier end, both of which are supplied with the amplifier output, all you are effectively doing is connecting the two sets of speaker terminals with a double length of speaker cable rather than with the built-in shunt.

    For the benefit of those new to the subject: there is a difference between bi-wiring and bi-amping. In either case you are connecting separate wires to two sets of speaker terminals (one leading to the woofer and the other to the tweeter), but when bi-wiring both of those wires go back to the same amplifier output. When bi-amping the wires go to different amplification channels, both of which are fed with the same (unamplified) signal at the input stage.

    As I said, I am increasingly of the opinion that bi-wiring is a conspiracy by speaker cable manufacturers. But bi-amping is a bit more useful. Active bi-amping, where the amplifier channels are downstream of the cross-over, can be even nicer - but you'll only see this in active speakers and also in some very high-end speakers that have an external cross-over.
     
  10. Nic Rhodes

    Nic Rhodes
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    :D :D :D :D ;)
     
  11. mattheu

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    Not sure if mentioned,but obviosly, each driver loads one set of cables and draws that frequeny down the cable.
    I found biwiring more effective when using two stereo pair power amps thus one supplies LF and the other HF.
    I feel that most speaker cable talk is madness and I'd spend more onthe speaker. When you're aware of the mark up and bull***t, good old mains cable will do. After all its nearly D.C

    Matt
     
  12. Brad_Porter

    Brad_Porter
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    I just aint sure about that comment. Well, at least you wont catch me using main cables for speaker wire.
     
  13. mattheu

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    Why not, copper has a natural purity of approx. 99.8 % solid core 1mm T&E with the earth removed makes fine speaker cable ( years back I found a 1.5mm solid twin that made a great cable between an LP12 a Nytec ampp and some HB2's), the dc comment, well its only 20KHz (cd) and copper's fine for use at 1GHz.
    The more important thing is cable run length and amp and speaker matching.
    As with all things the placebo effect is always in effect,but if you hear a difference than choose with your ears, not by review.
     
  14. Oli

    Oli
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    Business Idea!!!

    You could go down to every richer sounds in the country (or even Euroupe!) and get loads of cotton wool buds. Then sell them on to someone like boots (Once you have ammassed a few thousand packs)

    Don't thank me, I've just made u a million ;)
     
  15. mattheu

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    Hmmmm, I don't get it!
     

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