What film are you watching tonight/watched last night???

WeeScottishLass

Distinguished Member
I noticed that The Acid House is on film4 tonight (after Shallow Grave and Trainspotting which are both brilliant films) so recording it and absolutely can't wait to see it after adoring Filth!!
 

bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
Archenemy (2020) - Adam Egypt Mortimer - Amazon Rental

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With its throbbing electronic score and ultra low budget, Archenemy has the grimy look and feel of something from the eighties (which was fine by me). The film begins with a prologue that immediately gives away its indie roots; using an old fashioned, stop motion graphic novel effect to inform the viewer of the protagonist’s backstory. Its a move which may deter some but I thought it was done with some style, and a creative way to get around the lack of production funds. It works great with the story it is introducing, and is made even more effective thanks to Joe Maganiello’s (kind of Bale Batman style) gruff, gravelly tones over the narration.

The premise is an intriguing one - kind of like M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable in reverse (Maybe Mr. Nolan would have been a good fit??). Magniello plays an alcohol and meth addicted homeless bum, who spends his days in a bar recounting to anyone who will listen how he is actually a superhero from another dimension called Max Fist. In a furious battle with his nemesis (the archenemy of the title), Fist is catapulted through the cosmic dimensions, eventually ending up trapped on Earth. The only problem is that he says his superpowers do not work on earth! Becoming entwined with Max’s existence on our mortal planet is a brother and sister known as Hamster and Indigo. Hamster is an impressionable youth whose ambition is to be a reporter for a fashionable social media outlet (I think that’s what its supposed to be). His interactions and online video’s involving Max’s boasts unsurprisingly get a lot of hits. Meanwhile, there is a subplot involving Indigo’s involvement with the local big shot drug dealer. All these strands inevitably come together in the movie’s third act.

Undoubtedly, the most interesting plot point is the main one of Max Fist. His lack of superpowers greatly hinder Fist’s adamant insistence of who he really is. Is he telling the truth or is he a just a drug addicted, dangerous schizophrenic, homeless guy? Egypt Mortimer skilfully weaves this notion into his script, and does a good job of keeping the viewer in suspense right until the very end. Whenever Fist is off-screen, the secondary plot-line becomes a whole lot less involving. Manganiello is perfect casting - it could be argued that it is simultaneously ironic and also very fitting. The actor has made a habit of being the best man but never the groom in terms of superhero roles. He was apparently very close to getting the Man of Steel gig but his contract and filming schedule with True Blood prevented it (very similar to Tom Selleck not doing Indiana Jones). Then there is the Deathstroke thing (perhaps it will happen properly one day). Manganiello is a bit too gruff and rugged to play Superman (although the physique is a no brainer), but ideal for what the character in Archenemy is.

Archenemy has its flaws, most notably that none of the secondary characters are very interesting, so the film goes a bit flat whenever Fist is off screen. However, the lack of budget is not one of them, with the makers being really creative to get around it. The movie does a feel a bit of a throwback to the video shop era; with its pulsating electro score and grubby aesthetic that suggests violence is never too far from erupting. In that respect, Archenemy is in some ways reminiscent of Leigh Whannel’s Upgrade - another low budget, violent offering; and kind of different -but-same genre. I may be a little bit more forgiving than others, as I‘m always intrigued by anything that offers an alternative perspective - away from Marvel and DC - on the now (what many may consider to be) over saturated superhero genre. Movies such as the aforementioned Unbreakable but also the likes of Chronicle and Brightburn. If you’re anything like me, Archenemy is definitely worth a look.

7/10
 
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top4719

Well-known Member
Memories Of Murder - 7/10 - Gave this second look as I didn't appreciate it first time round but after enjoying Parasite a rewatch was needed, I like it this time, its a sort of police procedural akin to Fincher's Zodiac with a pair of unorthodox detectives on the path of a serial killer of young women, good characters and always interesting.
 

Stockholm

Distinguished Member
An Education - Lone Scherfig - 2009

Eh, what... Has this gone over my head or is this not basically a story about a grown man (Peter Sarsgaard) sexually grooming an underage girl (Carey Mulligan), manipulating and deceiving her parents (Alfred Molina and Cara Seymour) and stiffing elderly people out of their savings, art and houses that's played off as a bit of a generally harmless lark with a merry and glamourous veneer to conceal the repulsiveness of the film's characters and what they get up to over the course of the film?

It only takes a turn for the worse for the protagonist (Carey Mulligan) after David (Sarsgaard)
has his way with the girl and then engineers a situation intended to break her heart and send her packing so he can presumably move on to his next child. He's a true sociopath and deliberately placed the letter revealing his marital status in a place he knew she'd look.

Every character was detestable with the exception of maybe Olivia Williams' staid and stifled classics teacher.

Edit - I think it's the tone that makes it uncomfortable. He's portrayed as a dashing and sophisticated rogue but is really just a creepy kiddy fiddler who also uses underhand tactics to rob people and drive elderly people out of their homes.

Maybe portraying him in such a light is a result of the fact that this story is adapted from a memoir of a real women's childhood experiences and that's how she saw him. But even after he's revealed to be a major creeper
there's no real attempt to condemn his deviant personality and destructive behaviours.
 
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piston broke

Well-known Member
We watched Butter last night on Prime.
It's about butter carving.... Hi studio head, I've got an idea I want to pitch to you:confused:
And it's actually pretty funny, with moments that had the wife and I looking at each other going wtf and laughing. Then we looked at each other and laughed again 'cos we're watching a movie about carving butter. Kinda surreal:D
Next minute Hugh Jackman is in it. I mean, seriously. Talk about a double take:rotfl:
I gotta give it 7/10
 

WeeScottishLass

Distinguished Member
An Education - Lone Scherfig - 2009

Eh, what... Has this gone over my head or is this not basically a story about a grown man (Peter Sarsgaard) sexually grooming an underage girl (Carey Mulligan), manipulating and deceiving her parents (Alfred Molina and Cara Seymour) and stiffing elderly people out of their savings, art and houses that's played off as a bit of a generally harmless lark with a merry and glamourous veneer to conceal the repulsiveness of the film's characters and what they get up to over the course of the film?

It only takes a turn for the worse for the protagonist (Carey Mulligan) after David (Sarsgaard)
has his way with the girl and then engineers a situation intended to break her heart and send her packing so he can presumably move on to his next child. He's a true sociopath and deliberately placed the letter revealing his marital status in a place he knew she'd look.

Every character was detestable with the exception of maybe Olivia Williams' staid and stifled classics teacher.

Edit - I think it's the tone that makes it uncomfortable. He's portrayed as a dashing and sophisticated rogue but is really just a creepy kiddy fiddler who also uses underhand tactics to rob people and drive elderly people out of their homes.

Maybe portraying him in such a light is a result of the fact that this story is adapted from a memoir of a real women's childhood experiences and that's how she saw him. But even after he's revealed to be a major creeper
there's no real attempt to condemn his deviant personality and destructive behaviours.
Another one for my growing list.
 

RicksonGracie1972

Distinguished Member
The Accountant (2016)

I watched this on release and really enjoyed it, in fact I probably scored it 8/10 and left comments in here.
So last night was the 2nd time I had watched this and I also managed to persuade the wife to watch it with me and.......... I didn't enjoy it so much this time round, I just found it a bit daft. The wife also didn't like it much either.
Ben Afflecks character might be a mixture of Jason Bourne and Will Hunting but the execution isn't anywhere near as good.

The action is good though and for that reason I'd give it a 6/10
 

Tom Davies

Editorial Contributor
I noticed that The Acid House is on film4 tonight (after Shallow Grave and Trainspotting which are both brilliant films) so recording it and absolutely can't wait to see it after adoring Filth!!
What did you think?

It's definitely the weakest Irvine Welsh movie but it's adorably daft.
I remember finding the story about the baby hilarious when I was like 20.

An Education - Lone Scherfig - 2009

Eh, what... Has this gone over my head or is this not basically a story about a grown man (Peter Sarsgaard) sexually grooming an underage girl (Carey Mulligan), manipulating and deceiving her parents (Alfred Molina and Cara Seymour) and stiffing elderly people out of their savings, art and houses that's played off as a bit of a generally harmless lark with a merry and glamourous veneer to conceal the repulsiveness of the film's characters and what they get up to over the course of the film?

It only takes a turn for the worse for the protagonist (Carey Mulligan) after David (Sarsgaard)
has his way with the girl and then engineers a situation intended to break her heart and send her packing so he can presumably move on to his next child. He's a true sociopath and deliberately placed the letter revealing his marital status in a place he knew she'd look.

Every character was detestable with the exception of maybe Olivia Williams' staid and stifled classics teacher.

Edit - I think it's the tone that makes it uncomfortable. He's portrayed as a dashing and sophisticated rogue but is really just a creepy kiddy fiddler who also uses underhand tactics to rob people and drive elderly people out of their homes.

Maybe portraying him in such a light is a result of the fact that this story is adapted from a memoir of a real women's childhood experiences and that's how she saw him. But even after he's revealed to be a major creeper
there's no real attempt to condemn his deviant personality and destructive behaviours.
I totally did not get on with this movie either.
I was surprised by how laid back it felt about the whole business. It either went too subtle or it missed the mark tonally. It has like a "live and learn..." vibe at the end which is like, no. Not quite acceptable.
 
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Tom Davies

Editorial Contributor
Speaking of detestable people, I watched I Care A Lot last night.

Obviously Cas had the last word on this in his review so there's little more to say other than I didn't hate it. A lot of it is really fun and there are some good laughs in the first half but it definitely wants to have its cake and eat it in a lot of ways.
It wants you to find organised crime scary, then laugh at it.
It wants you to take the villain seriously, but also accept his total ineptitude.
It wants you to hate the main character but then root for them.
It wants to be a biting satire and pulpy crime movie (and isn't a very good version of either of those things - though it's definitely better at the former.)

None of the characters were either cartoonish enough to be fun or developed enough to be relatable, with the exception of Diane Wiest who gets the award this year for most underutilised part in a movie.

It makes some bold decisions but ultimately doesn't have the skill to pull them off. It's like a couple rewrites away from being a good movie.

The specifics of it, that conservatorship in the US is fundamentally broken in a pretty frightening way, are interesting and rightfully infuriating. But the wider implication that the movie shoots for is that a money driven life makes you sociopathic and that exploiting legal loopholes is the same as organised crime, which... duh.

Grade: C
 
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Stu75

Active Member
I still have not seen It Chapter 2 as I found the first one a bit underwhelming and silly.
That being said - the book is CRAZY. Like absolutely trouser-eatingly insane. It's a great example of King's "talcum powder" writing period in the 80s.
I'd be surprised if you like the second if you didn't really care for the first.
I loved part one and found the sequel borderline ridiculous.
 

Drax1

Distinguished Member
We watched Butter last night on Prime.
It's about butter carving.... Hi studio head, I've got an idea I want to pitch to you:confused:
And it's actually pretty funny, with moments that had the wife and I looking at each other going wtf and laughing. Then we looked at each other and laughed again 'cos we're watching a movie about carving butter. Kinda surreal:D
Next minute Hugh Jackman is in it. I mean, seriously. Talk about a double take:rotfl:
I gotta give it 7/10
Only 4 days left on Prime. Watched a bit on my lunch and it looks like fun.
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
Watched Commando and Con Air, both epic films if very old, on Star. Don't fancy anything else before my subscription ends as I have most on DVD or Bluray.
 

WeeScottishLass

Distinguished Member
What did you think?

It's definitely the weakest Irvine Welsh movie but it's adorably daft.
I remember finding the story about the baby hilarious when I was like 20.


I totally did not get on with this movie either.
I was surprised by how laid back it felt about the whole business. It either went too subtle or it missed the mark tonally. It has like a "live and learn..." vibe at the end which is like, no. Not quite acceptable.
I haven't watched it yet as I'll probably watch it on Friday 🙂
 

Coz22998

Distinguished Member
Spontaneous (2020, US iTunes, also streaming on Sky Go/Now TV)

A truly unique genre oddity that's part teen coming of age drama, part romantic comedy and part explosive body horror, all wrapped up into a delightful little package that's well worth tucking into.

Members of a small town's senior high school class just explode into a fountain of bloody parts for no reason at all and the film brings all the different issues that arise from this together through the focus of our way too intelligent lead and her burgeoning relationship with her classmate. The film lives or dies on the strengths of its leads and thankfully, the two here are wonderfully charming - sweary, damaged, pure cinematic creations they may be (although the nice gender swap of them having a pixie dream boy is a nice touch), but supremely charming nonetheless.

Katherine Langford has a lovely sardonic touch of the Olivia Cooke's (from Me, Earl and the Dying Girl) and Jessica Rothe's (from Happy Death Day) about her, while Charlie Plummer thankfully doesn't show a darker side to his not-annoying-nice-guy because he just is really that nice. And its this central relationship that ebbs and flows that drives the film - from meet cutes over Cronenberg film references to terrifying clinical isolation (where ET references take over as the order of the day) to hopeful (and horribly relevant) discussions about what the future could look like now this tragedy has taken place, they thoroughly convince.

Thankfully though, as great as they are together, the third act forces them apart and the film darkens as the horrible reality of this predicament - random and ridiculous on paper, but not so on screen - begins to come home and our leads have to deal with not just themselves but the town, the government and the entire world looking at them, judging them and being scared by them, forcing them to look to each other and feel the same way. Sure, the adults don't really get a look in, but its not that kind of film, the grown ups, as baffled and rendered as stupified by this situation as their kids, for nearly the entire run time in the same boat as us and their confused and scared offspring.

Ending on a wonderfully hopeful and more modern version of Renton's Trainspotting monologue, this film was a massive surprise - a hokey concept given weight and depth, with lots of different genres forced through the blender of pop culture awareness, a hugely likable lead pair and a killer soundtrack to boot.

Highly recommended.
 

bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
Spontaneous (2020, US iTunes, also streaming on Sky Go/Now TV)

A truly unique genre oddity that's part teen coming of age drama, part romantic comedy and part explosive body horror, all wrapped up into a delightful little package that's well worth tucking into.

Members of a small town's senior high school class just explode into a fountain of bloody parts for no reason at all and the film brings all the different issues that arise from this together through the focus of our way too intelligent lead and her burgeoning relationship with her classmate. The film lives or dies on the strengths of its leads and thankfully, the two here are wonderfully charming - sweary, damaged, pure cinematic creations they may be (although the nice gender swap of them having a pixie dream boy is a nice touch), but supremely charming nonetheless.

Katherine Langford has a lovely sardonic touch of the Olivia Cooke's (from Me, Earl and the Dying Girl) and Jessica Rothe's (from Happy Death Day) about her, while Charlie Plummer thankfully doesn't show a darker side to his not-annoying-nice-guy because he just is really that nice. And its this central relationship that ebbs and flows that drives the film - from meet cutes over Cronenberg film references to terrifying clinical isolation (where ET references take over as the order of the day) to hopeful (and horribly relevant) discussions about what the future could look like now this tragedy has taken place, they thoroughly convince.

Thankfully though, as great as they are together, the third act forces them apart and the film darkens as the horrible reality of this predicament - random and ridiculous on paper, but not so on screen - begins to come home and our leads have to deal with not just themselves but the town, the government and the entire world looking at them, judging them and being scared by them, forcing them to look to each other and feel the same way. Sure, the adults don't really get a look in, but its not that kind of film, the grown ups, as baffled and rendered as stupified by this situation as their kids, for nearly the entire run time in the same boat as us and their confused and scared offspring.

Ending on a wonderfully hopeful and more modern version of Renton's Trainspotting monologue, this film was a massive surprise - a hokey concept given weight and depth, with lots of different genres forced through the blender of pop culture awareness, a hugely likable lead pair and a killer soundtrack to boot.

Highly recommended.

This has been on my radar since I saw a trailer many months ago. Another one to add to the endless list. :thumbsup:
 

bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
At some point I'm going to have to try and address my own "endless" list. It's crossed the acceptable line now.

The only saving grace of lockdown is I’ve been able to catch up a teeny bit.
 

Drax1

Distinguished Member
At some point I'm going to have to try and address my own "endless" list. It's crossed the acceptable line now.
My list has gotten insanely long since I got properly organized with a Letterboxd account. I love how everything is logged, by my watchlist is just crazy. It grows every day with all the recommendations on there and AVF...
 

Drax1

Distinguished Member
We watched Butter last night on Prime.
It's about butter carving.... Hi studio head, I've got an idea I want to pitch to you:confused:
And it's actually pretty funny, with moments that had the wife and I looking at each other going wtf and laughing. Then we looked at each other and laughed again 'cos we're watching a movie about carving butter. Kinda surreal:D
Next minute Hugh Jackman is in it. I mean, seriously. Talk about a double take:rotfl:
I gotta give it 7/10
Cheers for the heads up on this. I've just given it a go, and I'd say a 7/10 is about right. Very offbeat, and quite the cast too. Oh, and if anyone out there is an Olivia Wilde fan (I was very much part of that movement following Tron Legacy), you HAVE to see this...
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
My list has gotten insanely long since I got properly organized with a Letterboxd account. I love how everything is logged, by my watchlist is just crazy. It grows every day with all the recommendations on there and AVF...

Letterboxd was the worst thing that ever happened for me.

It brought structure to the chaos....
 

bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
oo. Oh, and if anyone out there is an Olivia Wilde fan (I was very much part of that movement following Tron Legacy), you HAVE to see this...

SOLD

Edit: No-one told me Jennifer Garner, Wilde and Alicia Silverstone was in this!
 
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bruce-leroy

Distinguished Member
Streetfighter (1994) - Steven E. de Souza (Amazon Prime Instant)

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With the new Mortal Kombat movie around the corner, I thought now was a good time as any to revisit Steven E. de Souza’s 1994 live action adaptation of the Capcom arcade classic. Also, I’m running out of Van Damme films I can show my son (double standards I know, as I’d watched them all when I was even younger than he is now!). Has the passage of time made this less of an abomination from when I watched it back in the 90s? Was it really as bad as all that?

Sadly, its even worse than I remember. Much worse. Like a traumatic incident that you’ve somehow managed to lock away in a metaphorical box, but have now foolishly unleashed. Streetfighter must rank as the worst videogame adaptation ever committed to celluloid. It might just be worse than Super Mario Bros and Double Dragon (at least the latter has Mark Dacascos). Asylum Pictures or Uwe Boll would make a better film (I’m actually quite sure he has) than this. It doesn’t even get the right to be tagged so bad its good, or the cliched “guilty pleasure.” There is no camp factor to bracket alongside something like The Rocky Horror Picture Show. It’s just bad, bad, bad, bad, bad on every level.

There are so many things that are inexplicable about this ‘film.’ Such as how was it just not shelved and actually found a green light from the execs? How does the writer of action classics like Die Hard, 48 Hours and Commando end up making a film like this? Ok, so he didn’t have bags of experience as a director but the script will be good, right? There’ll be some nice zingers of course? WRONG (as Commando’s Matrix would say). There are so many things wrong with the script I could write the equivalent of War and Peace (which I obviously won’t). Jean Claude Van Damme is many things but he’s not funny. He might be unintentionally so but he is not funny. His dialogue delivery is absolute cringe central from start to finish. Ken and Ryu are supposed to be a pair of martial arts masters, not a couple of low rent scammers with non-existent karate skills.

Don’t get me started on the casting. Van Damme was a big star at the time - and i love him to bits - but which coke addled exec thought he’d be a good fit for the all American Guile?? C’mon, his Universal Soldier co-star would have been 10 times better without making much effort. How does a couple of charisma vacuums like Byron Mann and Damien Chapa (who, you ask?) end up as Ryu and Ken? A couple of guys who wouldn’t know hadouken from halloumi. The utter waste of Raul Julia as Bison. Ok, so at least the martial arts is good. Wrong again. Despite the great Benny “The Jet” Urquidez working on the film, the fight scenes are complete garbage and you can’t tell what’s going half the time. The only thing stopping this from being a zero is the presence of Ming Na Wen and Kylie as Chun Li and Cammie respectively. If you’re even tempted to go back for another look...DON’T.

1/10


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Jujitsu (2020) - Dimitri Logothetis (Chilli free vodafone rental)

I’ve read some derogatory reviews/comments about this movie but it’s far more enjoyable than...well...Streetfighter. It’s like a weird mish mash of Predator with martial arts and a dialled up to 12 Nic Cage. Just your average DTV actioner. Every 6 years, a comet passes - and in an ancient Burmese temple - a portal from another dimension opens. Out of this portal comes a kung fu kicking alien (man in a suit) who has to fight and kill 9 chosen warriors, or he will bring about the apocalypse in our world. Or something like that. Basically it’s an excuse for 90 minutes of martial arts slugouts. The difference between this and Streetfighter is that the set pieces are technically fantastic (if a bit repetitive the further we get into the story). Someone has also been playing a lot of video games as there’s a section of the movie where the fights switch between 1st person and 3rd person perspective. Relative newcomer Alain Moussi looks the part, he can really kick ass, but acts like a bookshelf. Frank Grillo is also completely wasted although Tony Jaa fares a bit better. Looking like Dennis Hopper in Apocalypse Now, it’s lucky, then, that Cage is in “full on Nic Cage” mode - lighting up the film whenever he is onscreen (which is no way near enough) and giving us a throwback to his days as a 90s action hero, whilst offering a touch of the manic Castor Troy style performance that was so memorable in Face/Off. Cage looks like he is enjoying himself, which can’t always be said of the likes of Willis and Cusack (and most other former A-listers now on the DTV bandwagon).

5/10


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Kickboxer: Vengeance (2016) - John Stockwell (amazon prime)

Vapid reboot of Van Damme’s late 80s classic. The director also made Jessica Alba’s Into The Blue - and was the traumatised Cougar in Top Gun - so it looks pretty but lacks the charm of the original. Beautiful Thai/Scottish model turned actress, Sara Malakul Lane, sets female equality back by around 30 years by being the most inept police detective to ever grace the screen. She’s basically just there to look pretty and have an unnecessary sex scene with the leading man (Alain Moussi again, although somewhat inexplicably, as there is nothing to suggest beforehanded that she fancied him). Gina Carano is also completely wasted and, more criminally, doesn’t even get to fight. Bautista cuts an intimidating presence as the distinctly non Thai Tong Po but he can’t lift a lid to Michel Quissi. The fights aren’t too bad and Van Damme also returns - with his most interested performance in years - in the role of the master that trains Kurt Sloane.

4.5/10


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Kickboxer: Retaliation (2018) - Dimitri Logothetis (Amazon Prime)

This one fares a bit better. Its more of the same but this time Kurt Sloane - after killing Tong Po (and thats not really a spoiler is it?) - is now a champion UFC fighter. This doesn’t last very long as Christopher Lambert (sounding like he’s been smoking 50 cigs a day) wants to drag him back into the murky world of illegal, underground fighting; so he forcibly has Kurt returned to Thailand and thrown into prison. In what might have been a genius move, his cellmates include Iron Mike Tyson (his incarceration well documented) and, of all people, Ronaldinho - who ironically, in real life, ended up in prison a couple of years later! Sara Malakul Lane returns (now no longer a cop) but no less inept. She ends up in hospital and wakes up in perfect, full makeup and eyelashes. The final showdown has Kurt face off against a monolithic man mountain called Mongkut (Hafthor Julius Bjornsson) and the result is suitably, bone-crunchingly, brutal.

5/10


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Ninja: Shadow Of a Tear (2013) - Isaac Florentine (Blu-ray)

Ninja: Shadow of a Tear is a violent martial arts revenge-fest starring Scott Adkins playing an American ninja. If that doesn’t sell it nothing will. How about it’s directed by Isaac Florentine who, along with Adkins, is one of the main creative forces behind the star’s popular Undisputed movies (as Boyka)? Florentine may be an indie/DTV director, but he’s also churned out some of the best low budget action movies made by a non Hong Kong/Asian team. If this guy was around during the Cannon era, he would have had a blast teaming up with the likes of Norris and Sho Kosugi. On the subject of the latter, his son (also an amazing martial artist and screen fighter) Kane Kosugi co-stars, and he and Adkins engage in a furious set piece that’s worth the price of admission alone. The only criticism I have of Florentine’s style as that he has a penchant for slo-mo that‘s up there with Woo’s MI:2 fight scenes (except less doves).

6/10


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Train To Busan Presents: Peninsula (2020) - Yeon Sang-ho (Blu-ray)

Extremely disappointing follow-up to the thrilling zombie shenanigans of Train To Busan. Everything good about the latter is ruined in one fell swoop with this lazy mish mash of zombies, Escape From New York, typical Korean melodrama and very daft Fast & The Furious wannabe (except with criminally atrocious CGI) Car-nage. Do not get on this train!

3/10
 
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