What film are you watching tonight/watched last night???

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member

top4719

Well-known Member
Candyman - 6/10 - With a remake about to hit I thought I'd try the original, I remember liking it at the time but not being blown away, second time around that opinion hasn't changed, it builds a good creepy atmosphere has a great Phillip Glass score and the cast are good, its just doesn't reach classic status for me.
 

Coz22998

Distinguished Member
Captain Kronos: Vampire Hunter (1974, streaming on UK Shudder/Amazon Prime)

At the same time Hammer were desperately searching for a new spin on their traditional vampire tales, with Sir Christopher of Lee getting continually grumpy and twitchy feet about reprising the role, along came this hopeful franchise starter to take things in a very different direction......

Sure, the gothic setting remained, but almost everything else was new: firstly, we got an odd if not unenjoyable genre mix of gothic vampire flick, heroic swashbuckler and murder mystery. Our very wooden lead rolls into town, with his hunchbacked companion (who, like the rest of the film is an interesting mix of part Igor, part Van Helsing), picks up Caroline Munro (because who wouldn't?) and is off to the races, coming at the request of an old school friend to help solve a series of odd murders.

Young women are being drained of their vitality leaving them rotten husks and of course, vampires are suspected. But unlike the suave and very out in the open Count and his clan, here we don't know who the vamps are, the attacks being shrouded in darkness until the reveal in the very final reel. The vampires here aren't all the same either - you have to find the specific method of dispatch for each creature: cue an amusing set of death attempts that continually failed, until the right method of death was accidentally stumbled upon.

And it all just about works - Kronos himself is just about the worst character in it, saddled with no backstory or anything to do other than swish his sabre and make out with doe-eyed Munro (to be honest I'd pay just to do that so I can't blame him). Yet the supporting cast, including a hilarious pub cameo from a very drunk Ian Hendry, are all jamboning it up for Britain and that smorgasbord of so many different riffs on the traditional vampire legend has a quaint whiff of charm to it all.

Its a shame we never got another film as it would have been great to see what Kronos would have taken on next. But at least we have this pleasing entry into the gothic horror cannon to make us smile.
 

tolmie

Active Member
Watched Birds of Prey lastnight, thought this was actually brilliant. Very witty, good fun and stunning picture quality, really enjoyed this.
 

RicksonGracie1972

Distinguished Member
Danger Close: The Battle of Long Tan (Netflix) 2019

I'm a fan of war films and particularly like a good Vietnam war film, with Platoon being one of my favourites, so when I saw advertised on Netflix I thought i'd give it a go, especially as my previous watch, Sandcastle, turned out to be rather enjoyable.

The film tells the story of the Australian and New Zealanders involvement, which is something I've not seen and, to be honest, I didn't know much about.

It stars Travis Fimmel (Ragnor Lothbrok from Vikings) as a Major who feels that the rag tag band of conscripts that he has to take charge of is beneath him.

The Battle of Long Tan is Famous amongst Aussie's and Kiwis as an example of true Aussie grit, much like The Battle of Rorke's Drift is to the Welsh or Dunkirk to the British.

There is plenty of action in this film, pretty much all the way through, much like Gibsons We were Soldiers. However the acting, or maybe the script, really lets this film down. there is every cliche in the book and none of the characters are consistent. Fimmel is probably one of the worst culprits as his character goes from being a hard nosed Special Forces Major, to a clueless buffoon, to military genius, to emotional wreck, to wimp to ....................

And Fimmel's character is not the only one who's character changes multiple times during the film.

I still enjoyed the film as the action was quite good so i'm going to give it 5.5/10
Oh and ignore all the 10's this has received on IMDB as these are clearly patriotic Aussies who, understandably, are proud of this particular battle and are glad to see that a film has been made about it.
 

Lancia34

Distinguished Member
Identity (BD) - I still love this film even though I've seen it multiple times. Great atmosphere throughout and the performances are perfectly oddball.
The one bit where i could have all fallen to pieces, the whodunnit is handled very cleverly so you know all along something isn't right but you are never given quite enough info to work it out beforehand and event though I've seen ti before and knew the outcome it was still immensely satisfying.

Top notch mystery thriller - 8.5/10
 

Jenz

Well-known Member
Mulan (2020)

Watched out of curiosity and Granddaughter was interested in it. Sadly not a patch on the original animation with all the heart and soul ripped out of it. Everything that made the original fun (Wise cracking Dragon, humour, and of course songs) all removed and as a result this was weak.

6/10 for watch once curiosity value. Would advice you don't buy it on Disney+ and wait for it to be free within the subscription.
 

Tom Davies

Editorial Contributor
Candyman - 6/10 - With a remake about to hit I thought I'd try the original, I remember liking it at the time but not being blown away, second time around that opinion hasn't changed, it builds a good creepy atmosphere has a great Phillip Glass score and the cast are good, its just doesn't reach classic status for me.
I remember seeing it as a young person and taking a knife to bed with me afterwards because I was so scared...
28 YEARS OLD, I WAS

Seriously though, I think it still holds up, not least because of Tony Todd.
Weird that Jake Sisko grew up to be both a famous author and a hook-wielding maniac.
 

pRot3us

Distinguished Member
Weird that Jake Sisko grew up to be both a famous author and a hook-wielding maniac.
But he did manage to board up a farmhouse and kill a number of zombies.
 

top4719

Well-known Member
Captain Kronos: Vampire Hunter (1974, streaming on UK Shudder/Amazon Prime)

At the same time Hammer were desperately searching for a new spin on their traditional vampire tales, with Sir Christopher of Lee getting continually grumpy and twitchy feet about reprising the role, along came this hopeful franchise starter to take things in a very different direction......

Sure, the gothic setting remained, but almost everything else was new: firstly, we got an odd if not unenjoyable genre mix of gothic vampire flick, heroic swashbuckler and murder mystery. Our very wooden lead rolls into town, with his hunchbacked companion (who, like the rest of the film is an interesting mix of part Igor, part Van Helsing), picks up Caroline Munro (because who wouldn't?) and is off to the races, coming at the request of an old school friend to help solve a series of odd murders.

Young women are being drained of their vitality leaving them rotten husks and of course, vampires are suspected. But unlike the suave and very out in the open Count and his clan, here we don't know who the vamps are, the attacks being shrouded in darkness until the reveal in the very final reel. The vampires here aren't all the same either - you have to find the specific method of dispatch for each creature: cue an amusing set of death attempts that continually failed, until the right method of death was accidentally stumbled upon.

And it all just about works - Kronos himself is just about the worst character in it, saddled with no backstory or anything to do other than swish his sabre and make out with doe-eyed Munro (to be honest I'd pay just to do that so I can't blame him). Yet the supporting cast, including a hilarious pub cameo from a very drunk Ian Hendry, are all jamboning it up for Britain and that smorgasbord of so many different riffs on the traditional vampire legend has a quaint whiff of charm to it all.

Its a shame we never got another film as it would have been great to see what Kronos would have taken on next. But at least we have this pleasing entry into the gothic horror cannon to make us smile.

I remember watching this as part of one of BBC2's excellent horror seasons, an oldie from the 30's, 40's followed by a newer film, great stuff.

The Dead Centre - 6.5/10 - Low budget horror/thriller involving a disturbed psychiatric patient and a corpse missing from a fatal fire, its grim throughout but holds the interest, worth a look.
 

lucasisking

Distinguished Member
A Beautiful Mind (2001) - Ron Howard
1600122404844.png

Never seen it before and thought it was pretty good, especially when a certain plot point is revealed. Yet, despite the acclaim, I just couldn't get on board with Russell Crowe's performance somehow. Just never settled with me. Liked Paul Bettany in a supporting role. 6.5/10


I'm Thinking of Ending Things (2020) - Charlie Kaufman
1600122778825.png

Watched this without realising there was a connection to the film above. I think this is probably the most interesting film I've seen this year. Starts off making you think it's one thing, before making you realise its about something completely different. Not 100% sure it worked as a satisfying whole however, at least not like Eternal Sunshine or John Malkovich. I get it, but I'm not sure its entirely as gripping. Had issues with the car scenes; far too long, and the clever script can only get you so far when you are trapped inside a vehicle. Fortunately the segments in the house and other pit stops make up for it with some delightfully surreal moments and enjoyably bonkers characters. I'd have preferred a more traditional denouement to the art-house conclusion we got (apparently the book is less opaque), but overall I found it worked as a weirdly off-kilter study of ageing and regret that was actually quite sad. I find myself in the weird place where I've enjoyed thinking about the film even more than watching it. I reckon I'll get more out of it on second watch. 7/10
 

Coz22998

Distinguished Member
21 Bridges (2019, streaming on UK Amazon Prime)

A solid but wholly generic cop thriller where everyone in it is simply too good for the material.

Getting almost all of its characterisation out of the way in the opening two scenes (young boy loses cop father, flash forward to young boy is now a cop being investigated for shooting a few too many criminals - character work DONE), we get a brutally efficient and effective drugs heist that goes spectacularly wrong, resulting in eight dead cops to kick things off. Chadwick Boseman comes in as the officer in charge and after surveillance footage shows the possible perpetrators heading into Manhattan, orders the island effectively sealed off by closing all the bridges, tunnels and other routes on and off it.

What follows is solid stuff indeed - we're talking Den of Thieves solid here, with a distinct NYPD Blue vibe to it: we follow the investigation whereby Boseman starts to wonder if his fellow cops actually want to catch these guys or if they just want to kill them where they stand in an act of self-appointed retribution (uncomfortably topical a few months later); yet we also follow our criminals on the lam trying to get off the island and using the criminal underground network to help them do it. Its all well acted, well crafted (there are some great swooping shots of helicopters over a night time NYC giving the film and the investigation both scope and scale) and well put together.

But as we follow each strand as they come crashing into each other, it all becomes a little too formulaic. It makes a mistake in ditching the most interesting perpetrator far too early, leaving us to follow the walking cliche of a young, but good man making a mistake because of a past tragedy. It never really makes use of its core concept of an island prison - all the action feels penned into a few city blocks, rendering the whole premise of the film somewhat moot. And when Boseman reveals what's really going on, resulting in a frankly ludicrous final shoot out in the lovely leafy suburbs at the film's climax, it comes as absolutely no surprise to anyone other than the characters on screen.

It carries on its theme of brutal efficiency with a number of shootouts that are bloody and very violent, yet everything else around it becomes little more than an extended TV show and one that we've seen hundreds of times before at that. Its entertaining while its on, but everyone - including Sienna Miller, J K Simmons, Taylor Kitsch and Keith David - is simply far too good for this material.

Solid. But averagely so.
 
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RicksonGracie1972

Distinguished Member
A Beautiful Mind (2001) - Ron Howard
View attachment 1365809
Never seen it before and thought it was pretty good, especially when a certain plot point is revealed. Yet, despite the acclaim, I just couldn't get on board with Russell Crowe's performance somehow. Just never settled with me. Liked Paul Bettany in a supporting role. 6.5/10
Surely this is worth a higher score just for how bloody gorgeous Jennifer Connelly looks
 

RicksonGracie1972

Distinguished Member
Four Weddings and a Funeral.

Watched for the 100th time, this film just doesn't get old.
I know Andie MacDowell is not everyone's cup of tea but her aside, this film is perfection.

9.5/10 (would have been a 10 but for AM)
 

Belzok

Active Member
A Beautiful Mind (2001) - Ron Howard
View attachment 1365809
Never seen it before and thought it was pretty good, especially when a certain plot point is revealed. Yet, despite the acclaim, I just couldn't get on board with Russell Crowe's performance somehow. Just never settled with me. Liked Paul Bettany in a supporting role. 6.5/10


I'm Thinking of Ending Things (2020) - Charlie Kaufman
View attachment 1365823
Watched this without realising there was a connection to the film above. I think this is probably the most interesting film I've seen this year. Starts off making you think it's one thing, before making you realise its about something completely different. Not 100% sure it worked as a satisfying whole however, at least not like Eternal Sunshine or John Malkovich. I get it, but I'm not sure its entirely as gripping. Had issues with the car scenes; far too long, and the clever script can only get you so far when you are trapped inside a vehicle. Fortunately the segments in the house and other pit stops make up for it with some delightfully surreal moments and enjoyably bonkers characters. I'd have preferred a more traditional denouement to the art-house conclusion we got (apparently the book is less opaque), but overall I found it worked as a weirdly off-kilter study of ageing and regret that was actually quite sad. I find myself in the weird place where I've enjoyed thinking about the film even more than watching it. I reckon I'll get more out of it on second watch. 7/10
A Beautiful Mind is one of my favourite films, Crowe does an absolutely superb job and Jennifer Connely is lovely.

Ending is outstanding IMO.
 

Coz22998

Distinguished Member
I Am Patrick Swayze (2019, UK iTunes)

I hate that Patrick Swayze is no longer with us.

And I hate even more that it took a watch of this outstanding documentary to make me realise how much he obviously meant to me growing up, judging from the floods of tears I've been in since this bloody thing started.

With unfettered access to those closest to him - his wife, his brother, his career team - and those he's worked with (just about every star he was on film with is interviewed - Demi Moore, Kelly Lynch, Sam Elliott, Rob Lowe, Thomas Howell, Lori Petty, etc), we get very open, honest and sometimes awfully unflinching interviews about 'Buddy', which together with rafts of home videos, take us through his amazing life.

From his hinted at parental abuse by his ballet teacher mother to the indignity he suffered as a trained dancer from Texas in the 1970s, all the way through his key films (and some not so key - that rollerskating one looks immense) to his horrifically sad death, the film has an emotion to it that just comes from the interviewees: every one lining up to tell us how utterly amazing he was as a human being, how perfect he was as an actor and as a man and unlike so many of these puff pieces that pass for 'reality' these days, you get a genuine sense from all of them that he really was. He really was all that and more.

Complex, haunted, difficult yet able to bring so much to so many through his larger than life film roles, this isn't an in-depth career retrospective, more a portrait of a man who really did seem to be just as perfect as everyone says he was, even with his demons. And it had me in absolute bits.

I hate that Patrick Swayze isn't with us any more and I hate even more that I'd forgotten just how good he was. This doc - and Swayze himself - was so good its just made me purchase Ghost. And I hated Ghost when I saw it at the cinema.......but I reckon I just might love it now.

And I hate that.

Outstanding.
 
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encaser

Member
Identity: Mmm, that tastes kinda Peety (2003)
Mmm Peety.JPG

Fired this up after someone mentioned it on here and glad I did. Pretty solid nonsense thriller/horror that keeps you entertained throughout, with a fine bunch of mainly character actor stars from further down the pay grade - which as it turns out, is no bad thing. It's pretty easy to work out where things are going but with enough fun moments and scream kills to keep it fruity. I love the setting of the era too. as it drags you back to younger days and styles of living.
Only one body
lovely Clea Duvall vanished in the supposed bomb blast
unaccounted for but I'll forgive that.

Monsters: Revenge of the Octu-spider-pussy (2010)
octospiderpussy.JPG

Another reco' from above.
Saw this years back too and thought I liked it but not much more. It works as a sedate escape from the beasties kinda romance film, with just Scoot McNairy (his tramp stamp!) and Whitney Able.
There's not much to see but fauna, flora and the odd carcass. Oh, and lingering shots of Able,; who you could imagine enthralled Gareth Edwards, by the amount of shots of her visage. It mostly goes OK but does lose pace and supposes a bit too much that the viewer accepts the sudden love struck romance of the two; that feels off at times and overplays some emotion with McNairy, who drifts from carefree to overly caring the next.
Oh and the alien monsters. Hmm. They look like land octopus with spider legs which, had I not seen Planet Earth with the ones here that venture across land, might've made me wince in embarrassment for Edwards a bit more. I dunno, you have to just go with it as some weird alien sample meets stuff here bastardisation that's not as cool or scary as Alien - but that's not the point.
 

encaser

Member
I Am Patrick Swayze (2019, UK iTunes)

I hate that Patrick Swayze is no longer with us.

And I hate even more that it took a watch of this outstanding documentary to make me realise how much he obviously meant to me growing up, judging from the floods of tears I've been in since this bloody thing started.

With unfettered access to those closest to him - his wife, his brother, his career team - and those he's worked with (just about every star he was on film with is interviewed - Demi Moore, Kelly Lynch, Sam Elliott, Rob Lowe, Thomas Howell, Lori Petty, etc), we get very open, honest and sometimes awfully unflinching interviews about 'Buddy', which together with rafts of home videos, take us through his amazing life.

From his hinted at parental abuse by his ballet teacher mother to the indignity he suffered as a trained dancer from Texas in the 1970s, all the way through his key films (and some not so key - that rollerskating one looks immense) to his horrifically sad death, the film has an emotion to it that just comes from the interviewees: every one lining up to tell us how utterly amazing he was as a human being, how perfect he was as an actor and as a man and unlike so many of these puff pieces that pass for 'reality' these days, you get a genuine sense from all of them that he really was. He really was all that and more.

Complex, haunted, difficult yet able to bring so much to so many through his larger than life film roles, this isn't an in-depth career retrospective, more a portrait of a man who really did seem to be just as perfect as everyone says he was, even with his demons. And it had me in absolute bits.

I hate that Patrick Swayze isn't with us any more and I hate even more that I'd forgotten just how good he was. This doc - and Swayze himself - was so good its just made me purchase Ghost. And I hated Ghost when I saw it at the cinema.......but I reckon I just might love it now.

And I hate that.

Outstanding.
I recall watching the last series he made and thinking, damn he doesn't quit as his terrible and hopeless diagnosis was in by then.
True gent.
 

KyleS1

Distinguished Member
I watched Mortal last night. Had no expectations going in and it started a little slow, but was actually an interesting film with a different take on super powers. Worth a watch if you are at a loss.
 

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