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What film are you watching tonight/watched last night???

systemsdead

Distinguished Member
The Report (2019) Directed by Scott Z.Burns
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Good performances all round and definitely an interesting set of accounts covering the CIA's post 9/11 torture and waterboarding program and all the backhanded cover-ups that went along with it, but for me these type of heavy political films more often than not just lose my attention no matter how hard I try to keep up, this was no different and I must have zoned out at least 3 times with this but the parts that did manage to grasp and gain my attention where interesting and pretty shocking, I'm sure fans of this type of film will appreciate it's level of detail and history of events a lot more than me. 6/10
 
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MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
Is Hollywood run by snowflakes?
Yesterday I decided to rent X Men Phoenix from Prime and managed to watch about a third if it.
First I could not work out where in the X Men films timeline this fitted
given that the Xmen were all young and Raven was killed so she could not have been in any other of the films when she was shown as being older.
But what I found most annoying was the unnecessary dialogue which filled miet of the film at least the hut I saw. All to often these days films have pointless and inappropriate dialogue, for instance two people being chased with men with guns will take refuge behind a car door, as if that will stop a bullet, and talk about their hopes and dreams etc etc.
This film as so much snowflake dialogue interspersed with a few minutes of action.
Definitely up there as the most boring film if the year.
 
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Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
I can see it now, attacking the enemy and getting shot because they are looking at their phones.
 

Coz22998

Distinguished Member
Anna and the Apocalypse (iTunes)

'Tis the season at last and the first Christmas watch of the season is this utterly delightful little British romzomcomusical.

"Shaun of the Dead meets La La Land" screams the lazy marketing guff, when in reality this is much more Submarine meets Sing Street meets Buffy's Once More With Feeling. That has zombies in it. And lots of grue.

Its a very British film, without that hyper stylised gloss that so many US productions seem to have, and yet the musical numbers (and be warned, this is NOT like La La Land where the musical numbers are scattered few and far between, its all the way through) are that brilliant mix of bombastic Steinman-esque rock opera and High School Musical-esque sing-and-dance-alongs and the two elements blend together wonderfully as the typically British small town is engulfed by the undead at Christmas.

The leads are all appealing (including Paul Kaye as the brilliantly sneering Headmaster of the local school), the music is superb, the gore and grue is that lovely mix of stomach churning and witty. And it even manages to homage a number of hardcore zombie movie tropes that cause undead nerds like me to break out in a knowing smile - an antagonist's demise is straight out of Joe Pilato's demise in Day.

And yet through it all is a real heart, with everyone going through real issues - the loss of a parent, the unrequited love for your best friend, the lack of direction as you reach adulthood - that just give the characters a real pathos so that when the not unexpected deaths of some of our leads hit, they do hit hard.

A just utterly charming British film that brings a huge smile to the face and a lovely warm feeling to your cockles. Be prepared to put it on your annual Christmas movie rotation for the rest of your days.
 

Garrett

Moderator
Is Hollywood run by snowflakes?
Yesterday I decided to rent X Men Phoenix from Prime and managed to watch about a third if it.
First I could not work out where in the X Men films timeline this fitted
given that the Xmen were all young and Raven was killed so she could not have been in any other of the films when she was shown as being older.
But what I found most annoying was the unnecessary dialogue which filled miet of the film at least the hut I saw. All to often these days films have pointless and inappropriate dialogue, for instance two people being chased with men with guns will take refuge behind a car door, as if that will stop a bullet, and talk about their hopes and dreams etc etc.
This film as so much snowflake dialogue interspersed with a few minutes of action.
Definitely up there as the most boring film if the year.
Spoiler spoilered and I remind you and others of spoilers and this thread Before Posting Here Read This :Spoilers What The Are and How To Hide Them, And Good Etiquette
Also to you spoiler
they altered the timeline with Days of Future Past the old X-Men X1, X2,X3 and the bits with Patrick Stewart Prof X etc existed but that timeline ended and a new one was formed when Raven saved the president and that's why now Jean is alive when Logan wakes, although that had to be resolved between Dark Phoenix and then in films that's not going to me made by Fox.
 

systemsdead

Distinguished Member
Screen Shot 2019-12-01 at 19.13.38.png

The 33 (2015) Directed by Patricia Riggen
Based on a true story about the collapse at the mine in San Jose, Chile that left 33 miners isolated underground for 69 days.
Watching the first 10 mins of this and I really didn't think I'd last for the duration especially in the way it ramps up that English delivery to heavy Mexican accents, this carries on for the whole film but once these miners descend into that mine and all hell breaks loose it becomes a pretty gripping series of events and a great tale of survival, definitely not the best in this kind of genre and let down by a hokey midway dream sequence but yeah I still pretty much enjoyed this, good Sunday afternoon viewing.6.5

Widows (2018) Directed by Steve McQueen
Decent enough but honestly expected something a bit more on point and memorable from McQueen, Viola Davis annoyed me the most so nothing new there.6.5
 

top4719

Active Member
The Sisters Brothers - 4/10 - Was looking forward to this, I love the Western genre and its got some great acting talent in the cast, its looks good but as a film its unengaging and sadly dull.
 

QuestShield

Distinguished Member
Ah The Sisters Brothers wasn't bad, could have done with a bit of fuel injection at times but intriguing. Great actors.
 

lucasisking

Distinguished Member
I liked TSB. It had some interesting ideas and didn't follow the western formula norm. But I doubt I'll ever go back for seconds.

Talking of second viewings.

All The Money In The World (2017) - Ridley Scott
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In spite of all the controversy surrounding Kevin Spacey's cancellation from society, I thought this was a serviceable but ultimately unremarkable addition to Sir Ridley's vast filmography. It still is, but on revisit I found myself getting quite into it this time. The story, however embellished it may be, is an interesting study in the value of wealth vs family and Scott does a good job of making it both dramatic and cinematic. Michelle Williams' performance can be a bit variable to be honest; Mark Wahlberg, depending on how you much can tolerate him generally, isn't too bad here in a more restrained role than usual. Best performances for me come from Christopher Plummer as J P Getty (who should always have been first choice before Spacey) and Romain Duris as Cinquanta; a sympathetic kidnapper. All thick Italian accent and stubble, he looks like he belongs in a spaghetti western; but I liked his character who provides the film's compassionate contrast to Getty's callous indifference. 7/10. As a side note, I've seen much of JP's vast art collection in the astoundingly lavish Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Awesome place and, thanks to the terms of the charitable trust, completely free to the public. Recommend if you are ever in the area.

Film now on Netflix
 

Robothamster

Distinguished Member
The Matrix (1999)

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Flicking through the TV channels last night and stumbled upon this showing on Sky1.

20 years old already, where has that time gone? Some of the effects are starting to age a little (the green screen stuff anyway) but all the slo-mo stuff are still uber cool.

This movie blew me away back when it was released, and I've probably watched it half a dozen times and it's still excellent. Shame the sequels were absolute pants.

8.5/10 still.
 

Stockholm

Distinguished Member
The Irishman - Martin Scorsese - 2019

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What it lacks in verve and swagger in comparison to Scorsese's other mafia epics it matches in maturity and contemplation of the price you pay for nurturing one type of relationship over others.

The film packs an emotional punch and deftly combines a little humour with pathos whilst ranging over betrayal, loyalty, and regret, among other poignant human experiences thanks to its narrative structure that allows it to dip in and out of its characters' lives at various points in time.

The relationship that packed the greatest emotional impact for me was definitely the one between Frank and his daughter Peggy. The young actress playing her stole the best shot of the film for me away from acting heavyweights like De Niro and the rest of its box office cast. That look of utter disgust and disdain she draws towards
Russell (Pesci) when he tries to win her affection or approval with not only a luxurious Christmas present but an actual bribe in the form of cash was powerful and brilliantly acted.
I thought her character had the absolutely perfect number of lines to convey her true feelings towards her dad and his friends. Anna Paquin did a good job of maintaining the child actress' depth of feeling and powerful stare.

I loved it and never felt its epic-inspired length tiring or a sign of poorly edited film, and nor did I find the de-ageing CGI obtrusive or distracting, Frank aside at certain points when it looked like he had been munching the Spice from Dune and had paranormally blue eyes. On the contrary, I was captivated by each of the story's three narrative segments and felt that its ending was powerful and poignant.

Some thoughts about the film:

- Frank executing Jimmy was the quintessential mob hit, i.e. you always get clipped by your closest pal or lieutenant, e.g.

- Some funny moments like the fish scene and the argument that ensues; Frank glossing over his charge sheet in court (he concedes to racketeering & loan sharking) only for Scorsese to overlay a litany of other charges, i.e. murder, kidnapping, etc; Frank wearing his Teamster Hat in the nursing home when he's being questioned by the Feds (his last chance at true atonement).

- Frank repeating Jimmy's insistence on leaving the door ajar at the end like little kids who're scared of the dark, or in this case of being entombed and having no means of escape.

- Scorsese drawing our attention to the connection between the CIA and the mafia in relation to JFK's assassination. If the mafia were able to co-opt members of the CIA (E Howard Hunt aka dumbo) to enact regime change to fulfil their agenda then it's hardly a stretch to imagine them doing the same to get payback against the Kennedys for stabbing them in the back.

- The ironic scene in which Jimmy explains the need to promote Fitz over others as he'd be unlikely to stab you in the back to an unconvinced Frank in a hotel room.

- The scene in which Frank has the sudden realisation that he didn't want to sit in front of the backseat strangler Sal and insists on sitting in the back instead was quite funny.

- I'm surprised Jimmy survived so long with how belligerent and disrespectful he was towards the real hidden power in the US at the time, i.e. the mafia. You just didn't step on their toes or dictate terms to them (see JFK as well) without some payback.

- Frank's callousness about execution carried over from duty during WW2. Only needed a look from his superiors to torture and kill enemies. Perfect for people like Russell and the hierarchy of the mafia.

- First word between Hoffa and Frank: 'I hear you paint houses'. Last image Hoffa ever sees (maybe): Jimmy painting that house with Hoffa's blood.
 
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Coz22998

Distinguished Member
Prospect (iTunes)

A gritty, textured space-western that has tonal ambitions that far exceed its scrawny narrative, this has an awful lot to enjoy.

Opening with some stunningly realized spaceship interiors and exteriors, that feel of dirt under the fingernails hits from minute one. Taking a design cue from the likes of Alien (in fact I would even go so far as to say that this could easily exist in that universe given the similarities of both the design and the feel to it), the world our father and daughter leading pair inhabit feels real and lived in. Alongside some truly stunning spaceship work reminiscent of the likes of Sunshine (is it model work? Is it CG? can't tell, but it looks amazing), the VFX work on show in these first few minutes is memorable and really rather brilliant.

That feel is transferred down to the planet as our pair descend to mine a precious mineral/gem on this outer rim world for some very dodgy sounding mercenaries. The screen is blanketed by floating spores (all shot for real apparently, no CG work here) that together with the clever narrative device of the act of 'mining' and some great character work give this familiar looking planet a real sense of actual peril.

And from here, the story begins to follow more closely traditional western tropes - mysterious strangers are come across, acts of danger are required to be traversed, all of which are given extra credence by Pedro Pascal's dialogue which sounds ripped straight of a Leone classic, rather than a space-set sci-fi adventure.

How you feel about the film from here then probably depends on how you feel about those classic westerns - and by classic I don't mean the John Ford ones, I'm talking more about the likes of McCabe and Mrs Miller, Little Big Man, etc. The story is not filled with rollocking setpieces, more gentle character work laying bare the hazardous existence of these explorers and the relationships that can result and be formed out of necessity, yet end up being incredibly important to our key leads.

I loved the sense of reality to it all - you never forget you're on a far-distant planet, yet every character and plot beat seems wholly plausible. And my love of those classic revisionist westerns means I didn't get bored of the slight narrative either, just enjoying the great character work and simple world-building the first time writers/directors brought to this. Its shot wonderfully and a lovely ambient soundtrack just amps up the beautiful danger of the planet itself.

Its not on steaming services at the moment in the UK I don't think, but this is £1.99 on iTunes and well worth less than the price of a crappy corporate coffee.
 

Toasty

Distinguished Member
Matrix Reloaded - On the back of @Robothamster review, I agree the original Matrix was amazing, coincidentally I watched the sequel recently and didn't get past the highway scene, which is a great action sequence, but some cgi scenes look like a PS3 game and the hedonist nature doesn't really work anymore. I will say Agent Smith is great value up to the point I watched, but doubt I'll rewatch the final film any time soon.

Spiderman Far From Home - First watch of this and its ok. I wasn't a big fan of the first and this is more of the same and for me, so many gadgets and other characters influencing him detracts from his own path. That said, he is conveniently unshackled for a while, but this felt more like Doctor Strange meets the Wizard of Oz and knowing a certain character didn't care at all makes you wonder why the audience should. That sounds mightily negative, sorry, I enjoyed the film more than this minor rant suggests and hopefully the end credits hint at a more intriguing outing next time..

Planes, Trains and Automobiles - Now we're talking, one of my favourite 'back in the day' comedies pairing up Steve Martin and John Candy perfectly. It starts off with standard clash of personalities road trip humour, but the film pulls you in when Martin lays into Candy's character way too hard. The memorable funny scenes come one after another from then on and tugs at your heart strings for a perfect ending. I still find certain scenes laugh out loud funny after so many rewatches and I can't even quote my favourite scene, so glad they stuck to a higher parental rating to keep it in!

The Knight before Christmas - Oh my lord, what was this? The problem with Netflix films nowadays is its hard to spot the 'made for tv' movies, after last years excellent Santa Chronicles, I thought I'd start December with one of Netflix's new Christmas offerings. While it looks like a slice of Christmas whimsy bringing a medieval Knight of Norwich, yay, to modern day Ohio, its acted just like every other low budget TV movie ever made. Everything is slow motion, there's pauses between each line of dialog, the plot is inoffensive and obvious, I really don't know why I watched its full run time, but I think I need to watch Bad Santa to wash away the schmaltz, gah..
 
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Malingo

Active Member
Matrix Reloaded - On the back of @Robothamster review, I agree the original Matrix was amazing, coincidentally I watched the sequel recently and didn't get past the highway scene, which is a great action sequence, but some cgi scenes look like a PS3 game and the hedonist nature doesn't really work anymore. I will say Agent Smith is great value up to the point I watched, but doubt I'll rewatch the final film any time soon.

Spiderman Far From Home - First watch of this and its ok. I wasn't a big fan of the first and this is more of the same and for me, so many gadgets and other characters influencing him detracts from his own path. That said, he is conveniently unshackled for a while, but this felt more like Doctor Strange meets the Wizard of Oz and knowing a certain character didn't care at all makes you wonder why the audience should. That sounds mightily negative, sorry, I enjoyed the film more than this minor rant suggests and hopefully the end credits hint at a more intriguing outing next time..

Planes, Trains and Automobiles - Now we're talking, one of my favourite 'back in the day' comedies pairing up Steve Martin and John Candy perfectly. It starts off with standard clash of personalities road trip humour, but the film pulls you in when Martin lays into Candy's character way too hard. The memorable funny scenes come one after another from then on and tugs at your heart strings for a perfect ending. I still find certain scenes laugh out loud funny after so many rewatches and I can't even quote my favourite scene, so glad they stuck to a higher parental rating to keep it in!

The Knight before Christmas - Oh my lord, what was this? The problem with Netflix films nowadays is its hard to spot the 'made for tv' movies, after last years excellent Santa Chronicles, I thought I'd start December with one of Netflix's new Christmas offerings. While it looks like a slice of Christmas whimsy bringing a medieval Knight of Norwich, yay, to modern day Ohio, its acted just like every other low budget TV movie ever made. Everything is slow motion, there's pauses between each line of dialog, the plot is inoffensive and obvious, I really don't know why I watched its full run time, but I think I need to watch Bad Santa to wash away the schmaltz, gah..
Planes, Trains and Automobiles - I rewatched this two years ago and it's just so hilarious and so heartbreaking. It's my favourite Steve Martin movie and my favourite John Candy Movie. I was also ONE HUNDRED PERCENT convinced it was a Christmas movie but it's not! it's Thanksgiving! IDIOT!

The Knight Before Christmas - Cannot wait. This is heading directly for Malingo's Christmas Countdown (shameless plug). I love an awful Hallmark-type Christmas movie.
 

encaser

Distinguished Member
Christine (2016)
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Something of an indie, that tells the true story of Christine Chubbuck, a local TV news reporter who's only real claim to fame turned out to be her attempted suicide live on TV.
It's hard going, not for the ending, but for her character that is difficult to easily like. It's not to say she isn't a worthy person; as she helped out at a school for the disabled with puppet shows offering life lessons to the young, or was a particularly needy soul but is that awkward/nerdy type - that weekly procedural shows love to utilize of late as 'overly bright'. The reality here being that she was plagued by mental illness that never got treated and led to her depression of life in general but more specifically in those taking it for granted in salacious and bloody reporting.
Rebecca Hall does well enough to draw Christine but the whole thing is a bit vapid at times and feels like you're watching a college project or spying on a fairly average person. Sure, she's at heart a deep soul that cries fatally out for honest journalism and tries to push that envelope at work but fails as her station manager needs viewership and not worthiness on air. Her social life is awkward at best and when she sees others connecting, she intrudes and out stays her welcome in telling them you have something special staying that bit too long to hit creepy or, alternately runs from connection.
Michael C. Hall is her falling flat love interest in the shape of station anchor presenter and offers little really in the flagging script beyond the usual hollow personality.
I can't really recommend this overall (unless you have a sentimental love for some music of the time) which is a tragedy in itself, considering this is based on the true story of a person with psychological issues failing but trying to make things better and paying the ultimate inward price to achieve a bigger result. The fact this then, and still now by extent, receives coverage is I feel more obviously due to many in the industry drawing upon it and not so much for Chubbuck herself or her story.
 

Malingo

Active Member
Christine (2016)

Something of an indie, that tells the true story of Christine Chubbuck, a local TV news reporter who's only real claim to fame turned out to be her attempted suicide live on TV.
It's hard going, not for the ending, but for her character that is difficult to easily like. It's not to say she isn't a worthy person; as she helped out at a school for the disabled with puppet shows offering life lessons to the young, or was a particularly needy soul but is that awkward/nerdy type - that weekly procedural shows love to utilize of late as 'overly bright'. The reality here being that she was plagued by mental illness that never got treated and led to her depression of life in general but more specifically in those taking it for granted in salacious and bloody reporting.
Rebecca Hall does well enough to draw Christine but the whole thing is a bit vapid at times and feels like you're watching a college project or spying on a fairly average person. Sure, at heart a deep soul that cries fatally out for honest journalism and tries to push that envelope at work but fails as her station manager needs viewership and not worthiness on air. Her social life is awkward at best and when she sees others connecting, she intrudes and out stays her welcome in telling them you have something special staying that bit too long to hit creepy or, alternately runs from connection.
Michael C. Hall is her falling flat love interest in the shape of station anchor presenter and offers little really in the flagging script beyond the usual hollow personality.
I can't really recommend this overall (unless you have a sentimental love for some music of the time) which is a tragedy in itself, considering this is based on the true story of a person with psychological issues failing but trying to make things better and paying the ultimate inward price to achieve a bigger result. The fact this then, and still now by extent, receives coverage is I feel more obviously due to many in the industry drawing upon it and not so much for Chubbuck herself or her story.
I like the bit where the car fixes itself.
 

Leo31291

Well-known Member
Snow White and the Huntsman
Odd casting choice in Kristen Stewart, and the heavily laden CGI cheapens the film. Halfway through I forgot it was a Snow White film. Charlize Theron is an absolute blast and the whole portrayal of the Queen from her performance to the costume is everything you could want. Interesting watch though seeing a modern take on the tale.

Signs
The foreshadowing is ridiculously heavy with hindsight, tone it down a little M.Night! Mel Gibsons shtick of looking down the lens of the camera in awe gets tiresome but the film does hit home in it's final act. Not as strong as when it came out for me unfortunately.

The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959)
Damn Christopher Lee was a handsome devil! I enjoyed it but there wasn't anything here to make me want to revisit. Peter Cushing and the cast are passable and it will do to pass the time at an easy 87 minutes.

Climax
I heard this was out there but blimey. Hadn't seen Gaspar Noe's previous work. This is something else for sure, if you're looking to break up the monotony of your movie watching then go for this. Kermode put it as an ''hellish orgy of catastrophe'' which sums it up... Some of the best camera work and use of lighting I've seen in a while.
 

raymondo77

Distinguished Member
Hobbs & Shaw: Without doubt the stupidest thing I've seen in the last week (and I've been reading the Knives Out review thread on here). Utterly preposterous, dumb in the extreme, cringe inducing at times, and about two and a half days too long...but I kinda enjoyed it!
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
Jeeeeeeeezus!

Just tried watching Transformers: Last Knight. That has to be one of the worst films I've ever seen. Truly appalling film making. Looked pretty though...!

Genuinely liked the first and tolerated the second (because Megan Fox), but fudge me, Bay reached a new low with that tripe.

1/10
 

lucasisking

Distinguished Member
Queen & Slim (2019) - Melina Matsoukas
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The black Bonnie & Clyde. Hmm. Just seen a preview, and I just know its going to soak up all the praise, be swooned over at the Guardian, and be seen as a poster girl for brave black women directors blah etc. So I need to get this out this rant while its fresh in my mind.

First half is fine, pretty good actually. The tone is uncertain, beginning with a dramatic act of violent injustice (a cartoonily racist cop stop & search, but fine). Melina Matsoukas manages to add some really good and surprisingly organic comedy into the mix, and the audience, me included, were laughing often in spite of the subject matter. I was really enjoying it. Things improve further when we are introduced to Bokeem Woodbine's character, and all is set for a potentially exciting and unpredictable road trip and I had no idea where it might go next.

And here the film falls apart. The humour dries up almost entirely, to be replaced with a forced and unmoving romance, dull encounters and an utterly boring, stunningly indulgent black road trip where Matsoukas ladels on the martyrdom and self-congratulation in such repetitive and heavy doses that I began to tune out. We are meant to believe that the two protagonists are becoming modern day folk heroes to the black community, despite doing absolutely nothing except drive and occasionally hide out. True Romance it ain't. There is a horribly uncomfortable and unnecessarily protracted sex scene, intercut with riot scenes where
a black kid -inspired by the pair- shoots a cop in the face and is subsequently killed off screen
. It's ugly and nauseating on both counts, not in an emotive way, but in a 'I feel like walking out' kind of way.

Daniel Kaluuya is superb in his role as a sympathetic, laid back guy who is a victim of injustice, but almost noone else is remotely likeable. Jodie Turner-Smith is sullen and boring and the two have no chemistry; other black characters are shown as stereotypes, and almost all white people and cops are portrayed as the enemy, with the odd grudging exception. Come the ending, I didn't care even a little bit, and I know I was meant too.

Last year's Green Book may have been simplistic and naive, told by a naive white person. But it at least had a postive message at it's heart. Matsoukas' message is one of division, mistrust, rage and ultimately segregation. How is that a positive message for a generation? I can't recommend it. 5/10 just for the first half, Woodbine and Kaluuya.
 

Malingo

Active Member
I
Queen & Slim (2019) - Melina Matsoukas
View attachment 1227975

The black Bonnie & Clyde. Hmm. Just seen a preview, and I just know its going to soak up all the praise, be swooned over at the Guardian, and be seen as a poster girl for brave black women directors blah etc. So I need to get this out this rant while its fresh in my mind.

First half is fine, pretty good actually. The tone is uncertain, beginning with a dramatic act of violent injustice (a cartoonily racist cop stop & search, but fine). Melina Matsoukas manages to add some really good and surprisingly organic comedy into the mix, and the audience, me included, were laughing often in spite of the subject matter. I was really enjoying it. Things improve further when we are introduced to Bokeem Woodbine's character, and all is set for a potentially exciting and unpredictable road trip and I had no idea where it might go next.

And here the film falls apart. The humour dries up almost entirely, to be replaced with a forced and unmoving romance, dull encounters and an utterly boring, stunningly indulgent black road trip where Matsoukas ladels on the martyrdom and self-congratulation in such repetitive and heavy doses that I began to tune out. We are meant to believe that the two protagonists are becoming modern day folk heroes to the black community, despite doing absolutely nothing except drive and occasionally hide out. True Romance it ain't. There is a horribly uncomfortable and unnecessarily protracted sex scene, intercut with riot scenes where
a black kid -inspired by the pair- shoots a cop in the face and is subsequently killed off screen
. It's ugly and nauseating on both counts, not in an emotive way, but in a 'I feel like walking out' kind of way.

Daniel Kaluuya is superb in his role as a sympathetic, laid back guy who is a victim of injustice, but almost noone else is remotely likeable. Jodie Turner-Smith is sullen and boring and the two have no chemistry; other black characters are shown as stereotypes, and almost all white people and cops are portrayed as the enemy, with the odd grudging exception. Come the ending, I didn't care even a little bit, and I know I was meant too.

Last year's Green Book may have been simplistic and naive, told by a naive white person. But it at least had a postive message at it's heart. Matsoukas' message is one of division, mistrust, rage and ultimately segregation. How is that a positive message for a generation? I can't recommend it. 5/10 just for the first half, Woodbine and Kaluuya.
I would be very surprised at praise being heaped on this given how heavy handed and often quite boring it was.

I wouldn't call the cop in the opening scene cartoonish, however, as much of the dialogue here is taken from genuine recorded traffic stops resulting in the deaths of innocent black citizens, particularly those of Sandra Bland and Trayvon Martin.

The opening prepped me for an angry, powerful piece of black cinema...I was extremely disappointed.

More cohesive thoughts tomorrow... TBC.
 

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