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What Does the Delay Setting do?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by Sunday Ironfoot, Feb 26, 2003.

  1. Sunday Ironfoot

    Sunday Ironfoot
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    I have an option to adjust the 'Delay' setting on my Surround Sound System (see signiture), but what exactly does this do? I'm guessing at this point that it's something you adjust if your rear speakers are further away than your front one's or something like that. Is it worth adjusting this setting, and what are the effects of adding extra delay on DD5.1/DTS recordings or the surround sound stage in general?

    At the moment I have my four main speakers at equal distances from the listening position (ie. I'm sitting right in the centre), with my centre speaker on top of my TV. Thanks for any help!
     
  2. HotblackDesiato

    HotblackDesiato
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    There are handy graphs on the dolby.com site that will guide you towards the delay, if required, you need to employ.

    spence
     
  3. Squirrel God

    Squirrel God
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    There is speaker delay and also delays which can be set between the time a sound is heard at the front and at the rears.

    The former is what you might want to adjust to compensate for speaker placement. Although you're sitting dead in the middle, if you were to measure a straight line from each speaker to your ear (or the centre of your seat), would the distance be the same? (The answer would definitely be no if your centre speaker is parallel with the front L&R pair). If no, then delays help compensate for this.

    I can only set the centre speaker delay on my receiver, but I can't say that I notice any difference...

    The latter type of delay is all part of DSP and results in different types of effects.
     
  4. Sunday Ironfoot

    Sunday Ironfoot
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    Thanks for the advice, according to Dolby.com I only need to set a 1 ms delay for my centre speaker, might as well not bother. At least I know now, cheers :smashin:
     
  5. Squirrel God

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    That's what mine's set at. Can't say it makes any difference. Each 1 sec delay equals about a 30cm 'move back' of the speaker if I remember rightly.
     
  6. nunew33

    nunew33
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    Delays on my amp made a discernable difference.

    I sit between the rears which are both 5ft away from my head.

    I am 14 feet away from the fronts 13 from the centre.

    I think that translates to approx 3ms delay between rears and fronts (is it 1ms per 3ft?).

    Setting the delays made the transition of sound from front to rear and vice versa much more natural. ie sounds between front and rears could be located rather than either being from front or rear.

    In a couple of films it was enough to get the hair up on the back of the neck, when it didnt before.
     
  7. Squirrel God

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    My Yamaha manual says 1 ms = 30cms, which is about 1ft isnt it?

    I'm quite close to my speakers so I guess that's why I ca'nt notice any difference.
     
  8. nunew33

    nunew33
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    Yes your right speed of sound is about 330 m/s so it is 1ms per ft.
     

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