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What does HDTV-ready actually mean?

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by JackFlash, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. JackFlash

    JackFlash
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    It seems that the world and his dog are all claiming that their latest LCD TVs are HDTV-ready but does anyone actually know whether these claims are worth the paper they are written on? Does HDTV-ready mean:

    (a) Capable of displaying HDTV images?

    (b) Capable of receiving HDTV signals through the aerial?

    (c) Capable of decrypting HDCP-encrypted signals (i.e. the ones Sky will be broadcasting next year)?

    (d) All of the above?

    And another thing. If a manufacturer claims that a product is HDCP-compliant is there any way of testing it? I recently bought the Acer AL2671W on the understanding (from someone on this forum) that it wouldn't be HDCP-compliant. However on speaking to someone at Acer they guaranteed to me that the DVI-D terminal was indeed HDCP-compliant. They even sent me a product spec. sheet which states this. However I have read a review which doubts whether this is true and, given the price (£639) I'm not convinced. It plays HDTV clips brilliantly (downloaded from Microsoft) but what about the Sky stuff next year?

    Does anyone know how I can get hold of some HDCP-encrypted content?

    Cheers

    Jack
     
  2. Rob20

    Rob20
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    The requirements for a tv to be able to display the 'HD Ready logo' is:

    - 720 lines minimum native.
    - 720p 50/60hz.
    - 1080i 50/60hz.
    - HDCP compliant dvi or hdmi.

    Think those are the main ones. Still, I'd would stil be wary of tvs claiming to be high def ready until I'd seen proof.
     
  3. jimsan

    jimsan
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    Absolutely fantastic, awkward questions, Jack.

    To me onlt TV's that can display HDCP encryped signals should get to be called HDTV ready.

    More and more TV's are claiming this and many of their spec sheets are also claiming them to be HDCP ready. The new V7LTV26C is now available for £579 and its spec sheet claims fantastic connectivity including a HDCP enabled DVI socket!! £579!!

    This is fantastic! If it's true. So to your point...how can this be confirmed?

    I don't know..is the answer....

    Jimmy
     
  4. GrahamC

    GrahamC
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    And these were only set recently so who knows.
     
  5. ianh64

    ianh64
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    Hi Jack

    There are a number of HD-TV ready stickers. Only one is recognised by an official European broadcasting body (EBU) and as I have not seen one I can't tell you what it looks like. The others, like the ones on the Sony sets were probably dreamed up by the marketing people and certainly well before we got offical word what HD TV broadcasts will look like in Europe.

    So basically, unless it is the one from the EBU (European Broadcasting Union), take it with a pinch of salt.

    However, it only states what signals the display is to receive and in what format. It is not about decrypting Sky HD broadcasts or taking a signal in through an earial. This is all STB terrarory. It does hoever cover the resolutions, 720p50, 1080i25 and HDCP compliance (not the same as decrypting Sky HD as it will be broadcast encrypted in a different format to the encryption that the STB adds to the DVI/HDMI feed to the display)

    As for testing HDCP compliance, you need to feed a digitial source into the display that you know is copy protected from a DVD player (or other suitable source) that used HDCP. Some DVD players will not used HDCP for non CP sources. That is pretty much the only way of knowing. It also meants that you know the display will accept the resolutions that you want it to, ie 720p and 1080i at 50Hz. If a display is not HDCP compliant, you basically get a blank screen when playing back from an HDCP encoded feed. This may be only during the main film so you must beable to watch the movie that you intend to view.

    -Ian
     
  6. loz

    loz
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    Where did you find it for £579? inc VAT?

    I note the spec says 25ms response time though which isnt very good for watching TV, especially sports/action.
    Though they might be conservative with their specs.
     
  7. PDM

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    I believe the following link shows you the new revamped HDTV Ready logo (as of late Jan 2005) : http://www.1080.org.uk/

    the older logo was : http://www.1080.org.uk/hdtv_label.shtml
     
  8. ianh64

    ianh64
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    Thanks for that.

    So the logo can be self certificated for displays that meet the following:

    1. Display, display engine
    The minimum native resolution of the display (e.g. LCD, PDP) or display engine (e.g. DLP) is 720 physical lines in wide aspect ratio.

    2. Video Interfaces
    The display device accepts HD input via:
    o Analogue YPbPr1, and
    o DVI or HDMI

    HD capable inputs accept the following HD video formats:
    o 1280x720 @ 50 and 60Hz progressive (“720p”), and
    o 1920x1080 @ 50 and 60Hz interlaced (“1080i”)

    The DVI or HDMI input supports content protection (HDCP)



    So does that rule out the Philips 9986 that won't simultaneously accept Analogue YPbPr1 and DVI or HDMI ?
     
  9. jimg

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    :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :D :D :D
     
  10. Alan D

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    A friend of mine has just ordered a Sony plasma that actually has a "high definition ready" sticker on it in the shop - but it's an ALis panel with no digital inputs! (and unlikely to be upgradable) I did try to tell him.
     
  11. jimsan

    jimsan
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    Of course the 9986 will take Component and DVI at the same time. Just need a wee adapter....No big deal Jimg.

    Jimmy
     
  12. jimsan

    jimsan
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    Sorry not to answer this quicker.Got a Fax through at work from a company selling these VideoSeven 26 inchers for £579 Including VAT and a free coulour inkjet printer. I have contacted then and they seem genuine. I've left the printout at work, but I'll post their websit and contact numbers tomorrow morning.

    Jimmy
     
  13. JackFlash

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    All seems clear as mud then...
     

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