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What do you burn?

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
I see the government are going to ban the sale of coal and wet wood for burning domestically in the next couple of years.

So we need to find an alternative to the grade 2 coal we use - what do other people use? When we first moved here, 10 years ago, we used briquettes of some sort, but I found them hard to get going - have they improved?

Wet wood, we buy by the truck load, so the new regulations won’t apply - we dry it before burning anyway, as do most people that buy it like this. I can’t actually understand people burning wet wood, it’s very difficult to burn, and if you do get it going, doesn’t give off a lot of heat - aside from the pollution aspect.
 

nvingo

Well-known Member
Does it mean all domestic 'coal'?
Will there be an 'incentive' for coal-fire users to switch boilers to other fuels? (Actually I take it that electricity will be the 'only' alternative).
Will heritage hobbyists still be able to run their traction engines at rallies, and heritage railways be able to steam their main attractions?
 

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
Does it mean all domestic 'coal'?
Will there be an 'incentive' for coal-fire users to switch boilers to other fuels? (Actually I take it that electricity will be the 'only' alternative).
Will heritage hobbyists still be able to run their traction engines at rallies, and heritage railways be able to steam their main attractions?
Not as draconian as all that. Most polluting household fire fuels to be banned

It just applies to the fuel we burn in the home as far as I can see. There are alternatives to coal, so was just wondering what others are using.

We’ll carry on using wood, both bought in and stuff we fell ourselves; but we still use coal as our main reliable source of fuel to burn in the stoves.

If there’s just one of us in the house, as there often is, we‘ll just camp in the living room with the fire going, rather than turning on the heating for the whole house, which, being oil-fired, is expensive to run.
 

RBZ5416

Distinguished Member
My log burner doesn't get used much these days as it doesn't really fit with my needs. But when it was first installed my ex brought a couple of bags of logs home from the garden centre where she works. It was like trying to set fire to a bucket of water! Plus it was expensive.

The Hotties logs are good but I get by now with what I get from the garden. I had another tree come down in Ciara that's waiting for a couple of dry days so I can take the chainsaw to it. That will be stored to season for next year. I have a moisture meter to ensure that anything that does get burnt is sufficiently dry.
 

nvingo

Well-known Member
I wonder if there's a way to store hydrogen in a combustible, non-polluting 'sponge' so that it slow-releases and burns like wood or coal - a synthetic solid fuel.
 

crashcris

Well-known Member
I wonder if there's a way to store hydrogen in a combustible, non-polluting 'sponge' so that it slow-releases and burns like wood or coal - a synthetic solid fuel.
I can't wait to see you pitch that on Dragon's Den. :)
 

Dony

Distinguished Member
Mostly burn seasoned wood, but occasionally will get turf/peat as I love the smell.
 

Racquel Darrian

Well-known Member
I only burn smokeless fuel.
Currently got my stove burning with Newheat briquettes.
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
Wood. Fell it, split it and stack it myself. We burn 15-20 stere a year.

Not bothered this year though. Got 3 years supply in at the mo.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
From what I gather the sale of coal, other than smokeless briquettes, will be banned. So will the sale of wet wood which is a lot cheaper to purchase than seasoned or kiln dried wood. Fuel poverty in this country is very high and this will push that poverty to another level.

The greenies were on the radio praising the announcement. If those middle class well heeled lot have their way we'll all be sitting in our houses in the freezing cold eating cold lentil soup.
 

John

Moderator
I see the government are going to ban the sale of coal and wet wood for burning domestically in the next couple of years.
Given his record on flip flopping, I wouldn't worry too much just yet
 

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
Given his record on flip flopping, I wouldn't worry too much just yet
I’m not worried particularly, I was just wondering what alternative fuels people are using.

We’ll always have access to firewood, it just requires a bit of effort, felling, cutting to size, splitting, stacking etc.

It’s more of the alternative to coal I’m interested in - I always found briquettes difficult to get going without resorting to a firelighter block - which is almost like admitting you’re not really Bear Grylls - so I try to avoid using them as much as possible; easy to do with wood or coal, as they burn so readily.
 

RBZ5416

Distinguished Member
I always found briquettes difficult to get going without resorting to a firelighter block
I found the Hotties to catch as well as seasoned logs using kindling. Haven't checked but they used to offer a discounted trial pack.

Edit
 

jassco

Distinguished Member
I'm intrigued how they'll police the selling of wet / unseasoned wood. Councils won't have the capacity to oversee it
 

gibbsy

Moderator
I'm intrigued how they'll police the selling of wet / unseasoned wood. Councils won't have the capacity to oversee it
They are going to recruit retired firefighters to walk up and down the streets sniffing the air. I'll have you know I have a very professional nose. :thumbsup:
 

leo79

Well-known Member
We only burn used tyres and engine oil. Leaves a lovely aroma in the house.
 

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