What do the sound modes on the DENON X4700H actually do?

Ignitis

Member
I have been using a DENON X4700H for a few months now but am still a little confused on what some of the sound modes actually do to the sound. I understand in general that you should use the same sound mode as the input source in order to decode Dolby or DTS audio such as Atmos or DTS:X but there are a few things I still don't understand?

1. What is the difference between "DTS: Neural X" and "DTS: Virtual X"?

2. If I am playing a source with a "DTS:HD Master audio" track but choose "DTS:HD + DSur", I believe the added "DSur" is for up-mixing. Does the lack of the "Master Audio" in the name mean I am not playing back the full quality any more?

3. I have 5.1 speakers. If I play back a "DD+" track from Netflix that is also 5.1, the speakers set to "DD+ + DSur" automatically. As I have the same amount of speakers as the track being played, will there be any difference between selecting "DD+ + DSur" or changing it to just "DD+". E.g. does the "+DSur" added to the end of the sound setting change the sound in any way because of the up-mixing processing if my speaker layout already matches the amount of input channels to the receiver? Is this the same for "DTS:HD + Neural X" and "DTS:HD + Virtual X"?

Basically, if I leave a 5.1 track that is DTS:HD Master Audio playing back on my 5.1 system using the default "DTS:HD + Neural X". Am I still getting the as intended audio back or is it being processed or the quality diminished in any way?
 
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Dolus

Active Member
I have been using a DENON X4700H for a few months now but am still a little confused on what some of the sound modes actually do to the sound. I understand in general that you should use the same sound mode as the input source in order to decode Dolby or DTS audio such as Atmos or DTS:X but there are a few things I still don't understand?

1. What is the difference between "DTS: Neural X" and "DTS: Virtual X"?
DTS: Neural:X is DTS's version of an upmixer. The main purpose of upmixers is to take advantage of all your speakers by creating extra channels. If you have a 5.1 setup and play a 2 channel source the upmixer will expand it to 5.1.

DTS Virtual:X is a way of getting three-dimensional surround sound without extra speakers.



2. If I am playing a source with a "DTS:HD Master audio" track but choose "DTS:HD + DSur", I believe the added "DSur" is for up-mixing. Does the lack of the "Master Audio" in the name mean I am not playing back the full quality any more?
You are not losing anything but if you are playing DTS:Master audio track it is likely to be 5.1 or better so would not need the DOLBY SURROUND upmixer. In fact it might not be available to choose in this instance. With DTS tracks I use the DTS Neural:X upmixer.

3. I have 5.1 speakers. If I play back a "DD+" track from Netflix that is also 5.1, the speakers set to "DD+ + DSur" automatically. As I have the same amount of speakers as the track being played, will there be any difference between selecting "DD+ + DSur" or changing it to just "DD+". E.g. does the "+DSur" added to the end of the sound setting change the sound in any way because of the up-mixing processing if my speaker layout already matches the amount of input channels to the receiver? Is this the same for "DTS:HD + Neural X" and "DTS:HD + Virtual X"?
A lot of streamed material is DD+Dolby DSur and is something to do with the way it handles Atmos metadata. If your system is non Atmos then I should not think changing it would make any difference You could use DTS Virtual:X to create pseudo height channels.
Basically, if I leave a 5.1 track that is DTS:HD Master Audio playing back on my 5.1 system using the default "DTS:HD + Neural X". Am I still getting the as intended audio back or is it being processed or the quality diminished in any way?
See the above answers.
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
DTS: Neural:X is DTS's version of an upmixer. The main purpose of upmixers is to take advantage of all your speakers by creating extra channels. If you have a 5.1 setup and play a 2 channel source the upmixer will expand it to 5.1.

DTS Virtual:X is a way of getting three-dimensional surround sound without extra speakers.

A lot of streamed material is DD+Dolby DSur and is something to do with the way it handles Atmos metadata. If your system is non Atmos then I should not think changing it would make any difference You could use DTS Virtual:X to create pseudo height channels.

See the above answers.


DTS VIRTUAL:X will only work in conjunction with DTS:X soundtracks or if using Neural:X upmixing. It cannot be utilised by Atmos or in association with Dolby Surround upmixing.


Most streaming services encode their audio using Dolby Digital Plus (DD+). This is a format akin to Dolby Digital, but with the potential to have 7.1 and a higher bitrate. It has a DD core that makes it relatively backward comparable with older setups devoid of a DD+ codec. It can also be used to deliver Atmos metadata included within the same audio package. DSur is Dolby Surround and this is an upmixing mode applied to the audio by the AV receiver as opposed to being a format. It has basically replaced Dolby Pro Logic onboard most ATmos enabled AV receivers and processors:

Dolby Surround Upmixer
When you invest in a Dolby Atmos home theater, you expect to get full use of all the components, even when the content you are playing is not mixed in Dolby Atmos. This includes taking advantage of overhead and Dolby Atmos enabled speakers to further enhance the playback experience.

Included in the Dolby Atmos technology bundle is a new advanced upmixer designed to be compatible with traditional channel-based as well as Dolby Atmos speaker systems. The Dolby surround upmixer expands the audio of channel-based content, including native stereo, 5.1, and 7.1 content, for playback through a Dolby Atmos system-regardless of speaker number or placement-while simultaneously honoring and maintaining the artist’s intent for the mix.

The Dolby surround upmixer analyzes and processes multiple perceptually spaced frequency bands, accurately steering each individually. The result is a surround playback experience characterized by precisely located audio elements and a more spacious ambience.

In a Dolby Atmos system, the channel-based mix is fully honored. Dolby Atmos enabled speakers and overhead speakers are employed to lend a sense of atmospherics or room effect to the listening experience. This new technology will process and upmix channel- based content to as many as 17 speaker locations at listener level and to 10 Dolby Atmos enabled or overhead speakers. Note: To maintain an accurate frontal audio image, the upmixer will not send upmixed audio to the left wide and right wide speakers or any speakers that are located between the left, center, and right speakers. Audio is not upmixed to the center surround speaker.

A center spread on/off control enables you to spread the center image across a wider front soundstage. This optional feature is ideally suited for playback of two-channel music content or playback of channel-based content in a home theater design that employs a wider screen configuration than typical installations.
 

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