• New Patreon Tier and Early Access Content available. If you would like to support AVForums, we now have a new Patreon Tier which gives you access to selected news, reviews and articles before they are available to the public. Read more.

What cable to use for a ATI Radeon 5770?

liamj2003

Standard Member
Hi all, :facepalm: I have setup and constructed this computer myself so have many doubts about this isssue, I am currently using a old style monitor vga lead from my graphic card through a pin converter connector (see pics of connector and gfx card) there is another strip of connectors below where i have nothing plugged in, which have another pin type connection i think some sort of (DVI- dual connection i think its called Im not sure) and two HDMI slots next to it i have also included a picture of the back of the graphic card to show you, (see gfx card pic)

My question is: What would be the best cable to use for this card, both my TVS (one is 1080p and the other 720p) which i use as monitors both have HDMI and PC IN connections, I plan to run the cable behind a wall so I need to get it right and decide which is the best cable to hide; HDMI?, VGA (DVI thingy), or through converter which i currently am using with VGA lead? (I will be splitting the signal between the two TVS its worth mentioning, so the desktop can be displayed on both, currently its split with the VGA lead but i have to keep changing the screen resoloution setting right down to 800x600 to display on both screens) = pain in the bum

Many thanks for ur help on this matter, and thanks for taking the time to read, what cable is best to use is the main question.

Regards Liam
 

Attachments

  • connector.jpg
    connector.jpg
    288 KB · Views: 72
  • my GFX card.jpg
    my GFX card.jpg
    201.3 KB · Views: 78
  • myGFXcard2.jpg
    myGFXcard2.jpg
    163.3 KB · Views: 81

andy1249

Distinguished Member
Neither VGA or DVI do sound , so HDMI is the best connection option.

DVI and HDMI are pin for pin compatible , so a DVI to HDMI lead would work but remember , no sound , so HDMI is still the best connection option.

With both DVI and HDMI you are limited in the length of cable for reliable operation , anything over 8 to 10 meters and there are usually issues , anything less than that and you should be fine.

That leaves the splitting question.
What are you planning on doing ? Are you going to be using both screens at the same time ?
Are you planning on spreading the desktop across both screens or do you want the same content on each screen?

With Both DVI and HDMI there is an electronic handshake that happens continously , the card will ask the TV's what resolution they are and try to set it up accordingly , this presents problems in your case as the TV's are a different native resolution.

Your best way out of this is to set the resolution on the PC to 1280 x 720 which is more commonly known as 720p , both TV's should accept that over HDMI.

You will need a quality HDMI distribution box , a 1 in two out box at least. Note that its a distribution box you want and not a splitter , when it comes to HDMI a splitter can only have one output active at any one time , a distribution box has all outputs active.

The box must have its own power supply , HDMI is not like USB where it can power external devices , the interface was never designed with that in mind , as a result , splitters or distribution boxes that dont have their own PSU tend to be very unstable. This is because they steal power from the HDMI interface , and not all HDMI interfaces can afford to have power stolen from them.
 

SUMMONER

Well-known Member
The video card has 2 DVI-I ports, one of which you are already using via the VGA adapter, 1 DisplayPort connector and 1 HDMI.

Since you are permanently putting the cables into the wall I would suggest running 2 HDMI and 1 Displayport cable.
The DisplayPort cable is purely optional, but may proof useful in the far future.

Since you only have 1 HDMI port on the video card the 2nd HDMI cable will need one of these adapters to plug into it.
 

liamj2003

Standard Member
Neither VGA or DVI do sound , so HDMI is the best connection option.

DVI and HDMI are pin for pin compatible , so a DVI to HDMI lead would work but remember , no sound , so HDMI is still the best connection option.

With both DVI and HDMI you are limited in the length of cable for reliable operation , anything over 8 to 10 meters and there are usually issues , anything less than that and you should be fine.

That leaves the splitting question.
What are you planning on doing ? Are you going to be using both screens at the same time ?
Are you planning on spreading the desktop across both screens or do you want the same content on each screen?

With Both DVI and HDMI there is an electronic handshake that happens continously , the card will ask the TV's what resolution they are and try to set it up accordingly , this presents problems in your case as the TV's are a different native resolution.

Your best way out of this is to set the resolution on the PC to 1280 x 720 which is more commonly known as 720p , both TV's should accept that over HDMI.

You will need a quality HDMI distribution box , a 1 in two out box at least. Note that its a distribution box you want and not a splitter , when it comes to HDMI a splitter can only have one output active at any one time , a distribution box has all outputs active.

The box must have its own power supply , HDMI is not like USB where it can power external devices , the interface was never designed with that in mind , as a result , splitters or distribution boxes that dont have their own PSU tend to be very unstable. This is because they steal power from the HDMI interface , and not all HDMI interfaces can afford to have power stolen from them.

THANKYOU Very much this has explained alot to me, I havent really thought about what i want to display on what screen, I guess the same thing but to be able to have different things in the future suits me aswell, (as I want to get into video editing etc)

The maximum cable length is 10m the other is 6m that goes upstairs to bedroom, So HDMI all the way huh? Should I buy the 1.4v models to be on the safe side (furure proof and all) and Ill look into the distribution box with power input.

Many thanks once again
 

andy1249

Distinguished Member
Should I buy the 1.4v models to be on the safe side (furure proof and all)

Theres no such thing mate , when sellers put numbers on cables like that its a pure con job. They only apply to the electronic chipsets within the hardware , they have nothing to do with cables.

With cables you really have only two types.

High speed or Standard speed. These logos are the results of a bandwidth throughput test carried out on the cable.

For 3D or 2D 1080p @ 60hz you would probably need High speed , but no cable longer than 8 meters has ever passed the high speed test.

Note that these signals are at the very low end of the high speed test , which goes right up to the limit of the interface , so these two signals can and most likely will work with any HDMI cable.

For everything else , standard speed will do , and yes , Blu ray in 2D falls firmly within standard speed limits.

There are also standard and high speed cables with ethernet , but not one manufacturer has implemented that feature in any piece of equipment , you dont need it , and most likely never will , as HDMI has no chance of replacing the more mature and more reliable standard ethernet port ( RJ45 socket).

So , bottom line , in the real world there are two types of HDMI cable , standard speed and high speed , get high speed if you can , anything else printed on the cable or packaging is just marketing guff.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Hisense U7H TV and T+A Solitaire T headphone reviews, AV/HiFi news plus, what is screen uniformity?
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom