What cable for 1080p at 20metres?

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by daverob, Feb 6, 2009.

  1. daverob

    daverob
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    I am fed-up- bleary-eyed and absolutely confused with all the manufacturer's info on their specific hdmi cables. All I really want is an honest answer to what I really believe is an honest question - which cable should I use for an 20 metre HDMI cable run? Will I need any amplification to maintain a 1080p quality signal due to the length I need or otherwise?

    The length of cable I need is to run from my Onkyo to a Pioneer 5090. Please can you help to rest a really jumbled-up - fed-up and baffled mind regarding this topic????:lease:

    Thanks Dave
     
  2. Member 319784

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    20m, probably best to use a HDMI over CAT5 solution.

    This will ensure Full HD 1080p 48bit at this length.

    You may be able to get a 20m HDMI cable, which will probably support 1080p/60hz but not the higher bitrate resolutions for deep colour source material.

    We sell a HDMI over Cat5 extender for 69.99 here

    Or we do a 35m HDMI cable which has a repeater built in. here at 99.99

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. daverob

    daverob
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    Hi Jamie S

    Many thanks for such a quick response. Unfortunately I don't fully understand what you mean by "20m - probably best to use a HDMI over cat 5 solution" This doesn't really mean anything to me!! Sorry for being such a newbie to this topic, but still appreciate your prompt reply,

    Cheers Dave
     
  4. MarkTaylor

    MarkTaylor
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    20m is well beyond the length at which anyone can say with certainty that a passive HDMI cable will work.

    It might, or it might not as a lot depends on the exact equipment you are using.

    Jamie is suggesting an HDMI solution that uses a cat5 cable, like those often used for computer networks, to carry the signal as these will work over longer distances.
     
  5. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
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    Hello daverob

    HDMI.org don't mandate a maximum cable length for HDMI cables.

    The latest cable Specs from HDMI.org are Standard speed (CAT1) and High Speed (CAT2).

    Cables certified to meet the CAT2 High Speed spec top out at around 8m - with CAT1 cables topping out at 15m! (The Media Factory)

    To achieve a 20m cable run you have a few options:

    Order and test a non certified 20m cable and see if it works for you - though keep in mind it may still fall over at a later date as we see higher bit rate signals appearing.

    Combine two CAT2/CAT1 cables plus an active signal extender to attain the 20m run. (Media Factory - Connect, Control and Install your Audio Visual equipment!)

    Use an HDMI over Fibre optic cable - can be costly though do work very well. (RT COM USA - Product Catalog)

    Use an HDMI over CAT5 solution - these units have a Send (Tx) and Receive (Rx) powered box that are connected by a single or dual CAT5 cables with HDMI Input on the Tx box and HDMI Output on the Rx box. (The Media Factory)

    Joe

    PS Forgot to mention Active cables - like the CAT1 and CAT2 cables these use copper conductors though this time the cable assembly includes an active repeater (usually at 15m) that is self powered.

    They can work OK though you can run into EDID and HDCP issues and unlike using two cables plus an external Extender you don't have the option to try a different Eepeater that may not have the same EDID or HDCP issues. (http://www.bettercables.com/hdmi-cable.aspx)
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2009

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