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What are 'i' and 'p' in camcorder resolution specification?

cadu

Standard Member
Hi,

What are 'i' and 'p' in camcorder resolution specification?

I am comparing some models and some of them just have 'i' (1920 x 1080i pixels) while others just 'p' (1280 x 720p pixels).

Thanks,
Cadu
 
Hi,

What are 'i' and 'p' in camcorder resolution specification?

I am comparing some models and some of them just have 'i' (1920 x 1080i pixels) while others just 'p' (1280 x 720p pixels).

Thanks,
Cadu

Hi Cadu - simplest explanation is that "i" is interlaced and "p" is progressive. Here is the best explanation that I have seen.

In general, progressive scans provide twice the information at a given resolution and frame rate. In other words, 1080/60p is better than 1080/60i (where 1080 is the number or lines of vertical resolution, and 60 is the frame rate in frames per second).

Hope this is helpful,

Bill
Hybrid Camera Revolution
 

cadu

Standard Member
Thanks Bill. I understood clearly!!!
Other related issue has appeared. I would appreciate further help:
Considering some camcorders just provides "i" footage, could I render a video as "p" based on that "i" raw footage?
I mean, since a video editing software (e.g. Vegas) make available render as "i" or "p", I am confuse if I record as "i" I should render just as "i", or when rendering I could exchange "i" or "p" as my wish (without to cause harm to video quality)...
Best,
Cadu
 

Bob++

Established Member
Generally speaking you can't convert "i" to "p" but you can do it the other way round. (If you make DVD's that is what you get anyway.)

I have a cam that shoots in both modes and rarely use the "p" setting. I have looked at the finished result on my HD TV and can hardly see any difference - it only seems to show when there is fast movement.

I don't think you should get too hung up in the progressive vs interlaced debate - there are more important attributes for a cam - notably the quality of the lense and the size of the sensors.
 

Chelters

Established Member
Thanks Bill. I understood clearly!!!
Other related issue has appeared. I would appreciate further help:
Considering some camcorders just provides "i" footage, could I render a video as "p" based on that "i" raw footage?
I mean, since a video editing software (e.g. Vegas) make available render as "i" or "p", I am confuse if I record as "i" I should render just as "i", or when rendering I could exchange "i" or "p" as my wish (without to cause harm to video quality)...
Best,
Cadu

Cadu, make sure your project properties (press ALT+ENTER) are set correct for the incoming video, also notice on the video tab of that dialog, the "de-interlace method", set to "blend" should be good but try the "Interpolate" in case that gives you better results.
When you come to render the project, use a "p" variant.
Another Bill, lots of us about :)
 

Chelters

Established Member
Chelters,
Could you explain what purpose there would be in rendering an interlaced vid into a progressive format?

Because that is what Cadu asked
"Considering some camcorders just provides "i" footage, could I render a video as "p" based on that "i" raw footage? "

And of course it would be better for computer use and probably LCD TV as they are progressive displays.
 

Bob++

Established Member
Hmmm.. OH I accept that you are much better informed than me and yes that was the question. I do find that people often don't ask the right questions though.

Is it really better? Why? I ask because I make all my video interlaced because progressive doesn't look any better on my HD 3D TV.
 

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