What a joke '1GB fibre' central London

TB303

Active Member
I've had it with them,
We've been with Virgin fibre for 4(?) years mostly with a 350mb connection and it just worked, then was upgraded to 1GB and the internet keeps cutting out, I have my own proper router so it's not a Wifi issue.

The connection keeps disconnecting, many times the service status says issue in the area, many times it doesn't, when it works the speed is often around 400mb. This is ridiculous, both me and my wife work from home and it's just pathetic. I wish we had another fibre alternative, we'd switch in a heart beat.

Why did the service quality go do? One hint is them being owned by a private equity group, which means their priorities are to load it with debt, cut costs and screw the customers.

Buyer beware.

PS
I've now got a dedicated 4G router (and a sim to go with it at £37 per month) as a 'backup' for these clowns service, what a time to be alive.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
I have found that as I have subsequently upgraded with VM that I have had various issues over the years. I have been with them since they introduced 512Kbps service :)

I would probably have jumped to another provider over the years and at sometimes did run an ADSL\VSDL line too. The problem I have is that where I am I only get ~40Mbps on VDSL which today is not enough.

The challenge when you upgrade is it shows any imperfections in your supply cable that might have just been able to cope at the lower speeds or not been as noticeable but at the new higher speed is immediately obvious.

I found that their Customer service staff skill levels vary ridiculously and that the majority are reading their scripts with little understanding of the higher-end services. You must have a problem with your WiFi sir ... :facepalm:

Having said that if the service is working correctly and your cabling and particularly power levels are working correctly the service is generally pretty good (apart from upload speeds).

In my latest upgrade to Gig 1 I had issues over the previous 550Mb service I had, which seemed to be fine. This manifested itself in upload packet loss up to around 20% which meant gaming and video conferencing particularly were affected, ranging from dropped calls to severe lag.

Turns out my power levels were off (again) and way over what they should be for upstream only. After eventually getting CS to send a technician the first one thought he had sorted my problem before he arrived. Turned out he was testing the next customer on his list and not mine. He didn't manage to find the fault and wanted somebody else to have a look.

The next technician was more knowledgeable and managed to diagnose that the power levels were way off. Unfortunately, if you compensate for the upstream power levels this moves out the down ones and as a result, fixing the upstreamed then caused downstream issues. He tried another couple of tests but was scratching his head as these came back fine. Since I am literally across the road from the box I said could it be the cable and running a new cable literally across the road to test proved their cable was an issue.

Next day I had a new cable pulled and then was put across my brick drive way which was relaid correctly. After putting in a new filter to get all the power levels in the right order all was good. The errors that I was seeing on upstream traffic where gone and so far since then its been ok.

I get 1.15Gbps (52Mbps up :( ) to my desktop on Speedtest and Steam downloads and other ones that can keep up max out at about 140MBs which is rather nice and nippy :)

Do you have Broadband Quality Monitor running as I find that quite good. Plus post your power level and stats on here and we check to see if there is a problem with your connection.
 
Last edited:

psychopomp1

Member
This is ridiculous, both me and my wife work from home and it's just pathetic.
In that case why not get a proper business connection (eg VM Business) so that you have an appropriate SLA? Service works, great...if not, you get compensated and/or a quick fix. Win win.
 

ih8mondays

Active Member
What dns servers do you use? VMs own or something else?

im on BT rather than VM, but found sometimes the internet just “disappeared”. Maybe something similar?

I couldn’t update the dns on the hub, but did do so on my main laptop and ever since haven’t noticed a problem. I set the primary DNS to the IP of the router but put opendns and google dns as secondary, tertiary, etc, onwards.
 

TB303

Active Member
Thanks mate that's a good idea,
The question is do I trust them to fix it in time... but built in 4G backup is not a bad idea...
 

TB303

Active Member
I have found that as I have subsequently upgraded with VM that I have had various issues over the years. I have been with them since they introduced 512Kbps service :)

I would probably have jumped to another provider over the years and at sometimes did run an ADSL\VSDL line too. The problem I have is that where I am I only get ~40Mbps on VDSL which today is not enough.

The challenge when you upgrade is it shows any imperfections in your supply cable that might have just been able to cope at the lower speeds or not been as noticeable but at the new higher speed is immediately obvious.

I found that their Customer service staff skill levels vary ridiculously and that the majority are reading their scripts with little understanding of the higher-end services. You must have a problem with your WiFi sir ... :facepalm:

Having said that if the service is working correctly and your cabling and particularly power levels are working correctly the service is generally pretty good (apart from upload speeds).

In my latest upgrade to Gig 1 I had issues over the previous 550Mb service I had, which seemed to be fine. This manifested itself in upload packet loss up to around 20% which meant gaming and video conferencing particularly were affected, ranging from dropped calls to severe lag.

Turns out my power levels were off (again) and way over what they should be for upstream only. After eventually getting CS to send a technician the first one thought he had sorted my problem before he arrived. Turned out he was testing the next customer on his list and not mine. He didn't manage to find the fault and wanted somebody else to have a look.

The next technician was more knowledgeable and managed to diagnose that the power levels were way off. Unfortunately, if you compensate for the upstream power levels this moves out the down ones and as a result, fixing the upstreamed then caused downstream issues. He tried another couple of tests but was scratching his head as these came back fine. Since I am literally across the road from the box I said could it be the cable and running a new cable literally across the road to test proved their cable was an issue.

Next day I had a new cable pulled and then was put across my brick drive way which was relaid correctly. After putting in a new filter to get all the power levels in the right order all was good. The errors that I was seeing on upstream traffic where gone and so far since then its been ok.

I get 1.15Gbps (52Mbps up :( ) to my desktop on Speedtest and Steam downloads and other ones that can keep up max out at about 140MBs which is rather nice and nippy :)

Do you have Broadband Quality Monitor running as I find that quite good. Plus post your power level and stats on here and we check to see if there is a problem with your connection.
Thanks mate, where can I find my power levels?
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Thanks mate, where can I find my power levels?

If you log into your VM SH4 and assuming its in modem only mode it should be


Take a screenshot or copy the values from the status, downstream and upstream tabs. Note anything interesting on the other two. Please note there is sometimes a bug whereby the SH4 thinks it is offline and you need a reboot of the SH4 to fix it....

Also, you mention WiFi provided by the other router but even then you probably won't get the full speed connection over it. I typically get up to 600Mbps on a good day but my wired will hit 1.15Gbps over Ethernet.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Also if you don't have your router in modem only mode you can try this too

 

outoftheknow

Moderator
I’m confused. Does the UK have have 10Gb connections available? The thread title and OP suggests you do.
 

outoftheknow

Moderator
No there is a typo with the big B.

Virgin's Gig One service syncs at 1.2Gbps.
Thanks - and your upload is so low because….. ? Surely that isn’t standard for the 1GB down plan?

Also (I am intrigued purely because of the different ways each country is
this stuff) - what is modem only mode in relation to an FTTP connection?

To me (here at least) fibre to the home/premises (no copper) ends at an NTD which is where yoh plug in an Ethernet cable. From there you simply need a router with a WAN socket to share the connection. You can plug a laptop straight in and start a connection as required by the way the connection is delivered by your ISP. A modem to me is a device that translates the technology in use to then share with a router. A modem is strictly speaking an NTD - in fact here some technologies are delivered using a network provider NTD and for some like HFC (cable) the Arris cable modem is referred to as the NTD. Fixed wireless and fibre end at an NTD with multiple ports so you can run two or more providers at once.
 

oneman

Well-known Member
Thanks - and your upload is so low because….. ? Surely that isn’t standard for the 1GB down plan?

Also (I am intrigued purely because of the different ways each country is
this stuff) - what is modem only mode in relation to an FTTP connection?

To me (here at least) fibre to the home/premises (no copper) ends at an NTD which is where yoh plug in an Ethernet cable. From there you simply need a router with a WAN socket to share the connection. You can plug a laptop straight in and start a connection as required by the way the connection is delivered by your ISP. A modem to me is a device that translates the technology in use to then share with a router. A modem is strictly speaking an NTD - in fact here some technologies are delivered using a network provider NTD and for some like HFC (cable) the Arris cable modem is referred to as the NTD. Fixed wireless and fibre end at an NTD with multiple ports so you can run two or more providers at once.
Very few companies offer synchronies connections, Openreach is 1000/110 and VM is 1200/40 I think.

And the VM have a hybrid Fibre/coax network with the hop from street cabinet to your house being coax through they are slowly swapping to FTTP with fibre to coax conversion happening on your property before getting to the modem still running DOCSIS.

The device they supply is a combined coax modem & router but can operate in modem mode if you wish to use your own router.

If you are have FTTP through somebody like BT using Openreach network then yes its a two device solution with separate NTD and router though some other suppliers of FTTP offer a single device NTD/Router I think.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Thanks - and your upload is so low because….. ? Surely that isn’t standard for the 1GB down plan?

Yes unfortunately that is Virgin Media's offering, the technology is capable of much more in fact it can do symmetric at those speeds. However, most of the UK home broadband connections are asymmetric with Virgin typically having particularly bad ratios of uploads\downloads. So yes for their 1.2 Gbps service is it is a miserly 55Mbps (ish) upload.

Also (I am intrigued purely because of the different ways each country is
this stuff) - what is modem only mode in relation to an FTTP connection?

Ah, that makes sense. Most properties don't really have FTTP and broadband advertised as fibre in the UK is more than likely not FTTP...

So a bit of history might help

Two main broadband networks in the UK are British Telecom which due to competition ended up as Openreach and is based on the original copper pair to the house for the vast majority of people. Originally connectivity was based on regular analog modems before ADSL was introduced with speeds up to 24Mbps (eventually). Fibre to the Cabinet (FTTC) bought fibre out to new cabinets in the street and was started around 10 years or so ago. This replaced all but the last bit of copper to the house and so speeds could go up to 76Mbps. The connection speed of ADSL and FTTC varied according to the distance (length of line) from the local telephone exchange or street cabinet respectively.

The second network was the coax network that was installed for cable TV during the 90's. It's gone through some amalgamation and name changes but is known as Virgin Media (currently). They have coax cable from the street cabinet to the house but fibre for other parts of the network. It introduced a 512kbps service around the year 2000. It has slowly increased in speed to now offering a 1.2Gbps service, where the last leg (coax) has remained unchanged.

FTTP is now being offered, particularly for new housing estates but even then Virgin's new variant is Radio Frequency over glass which is converted to DOCSIS in the house.

Most broadband in the UK is (wrongly) called fibre broadband, which causes confusion as the Advertising Standards Authority was persuaded that so long as there was a bit of fibre somewhere in the "last leg" then it could be marketed as such. :(

Modem Only mode makes the "router" act only to convert the incoming signal to Ethernet so is a bit like your NTD. However it can be for all types of connections, the reason is the ISP provided routers are usually not the best for performance, configuration, WiFi etc

To me (here at least) fibre to the home/premises (no copper) ends at an NTD which is where yoh plug in an Ethernet cable. From there you simply need a router with a WAN socket to share the connection. You can plug a laptop straight in and start a connection as required by the way the connection is delivered by your ISP. A modem to me is a device that translates the technology in use to then share with a router. A modem is strictly speaking an NTD - in fact here some technologies are delivered using a network provider NTD and for some like HFC (cable) the Arris cable modem is referred to as the NTD. Fixed wireless and fibre end at an NTD with multiple ports so you can run two or more providers at once.

Yep modem just converts one signal to another, typically in the UK this is a signal box.
 

outoftheknow

Moderator
Thanks @ChuckMountain. I left the UK in 2006 so I was there for the evolution up to that point but have been more confused with “fibre” there than I have been with the way broadband has been delivered here :)

fir the record we have a government entity that has built 121 points of interconnect around the country and fibre runs from there towards premises. Original plan was FTTP/H for “all” except the small percentage in the country. Government changed and decided they would save money by using a multiple technology mix to deliver the premises. The government entity decided who got what where and most got FTTC which here we call FTTN (node not cabinet). However we have FTTP, plus a multitude of technologies that use copper for the last “mile”. FTTN, FTTC (curb sometimes called FTTdp as in distribution point or even fibre to the pavement which is the most accurate description), HFC (cable), FW (fixed wireless) and satellite. To be fair the idea was all except FW and satellite would deliver at least 25mbps down but of course they made decisions about the number of nodes (cabinets) to finish quicker and many are too far away to get 25mbps. Still they could announce they were finished the rollout in just 10 years - and immediately announce the now required phase 2 to change a lot of the final mile with next level technology.

so yeh the way these things go down in countries like ours where decisions are made by either government or the biggest player/monopoly l, create a myriad of confusion:)

Benign dictatorships seem to do it best - fibre to every building and plans starting at 1Gbps symmetrical. Wouldn’t want to line in most of them but it is the pricine that it can be done without the endless daft decisions by those with vetted interests and/or political ideals……

Apologies OP - back on topic :)
 

TB303

Active Member
What a bunch of ******s are they, I booked a technician to come look at the connection, was given a 3 hour slot today, spent it at home. Did anyone show up? No. Did they bother letting me know? Why would they.

For a moment there I was seriously considering a business account with those clowns - avoid like the plague!
 

oneman

Well-known Member
What a bunch of ******s are they, I booked a technician to come look at the connection, was given a 3 hour slot today, spent it at home. Did anyone show up? No. Did they bother letting me know? Why would they.

For a moment there I was seriously considering a business account with those clowns - avoid like the plague!
You can normally call if you have an engineer booked to check what time they will be coming
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
I recently signed up to Community Fibre (London only).
The highest they offer is 3Gbps (I have a modest 400Mbps). They have a fibre cable to a socket on my wall, another fibre cable from wall to the modem, then Ethernet to the router.
They offer 3000/3000.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
I recently signed up to Community Fibre (London only).
The highest they offer is 3Gbps (I have a modest 400Mbps). They have a fibre cable to a socket on my wall, another fibre cable from wall to the modem, then Ethernet to the router.
They offer 3000/3000.

What was the price for the 3000 out of interest?
 

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