Wedding Lens

MartinH32

Well-known Member
While very expensive lens will be able at fully open it will always perform better by simply providing more light. A common FF portrait lens in the 85mm F1.4, now if you at 1.8 then depth of field is only 13cm. Now at f4 you would have 29cm, further the extra stops means the lens is sharper.

The solution is make sure you have enough light or the equipment to add light as necessary (fill light).
Just need to make sure we don't confuse lens sharpness with depth of field. A lens can be pin sharp at f1.4 as @ashenfie has pointed out. It's amount of what is in focus in the picture that will be pin sharp that you need to think about. If you photograph a portait of someones face with an 85mm at f1.4 you can get clean focus on the eye but the eyelashes may be out of focus because the depth of field is so shallow. Shooting wide open isn't always the solution.
 

MartinH32

Well-known Member
We're going off topic whilst also proving why not to try. This is now some very serious kit with a lot of knowledge and experience to use it.
I think it's a case of don't expert pro results with a 3300. Keep your expectations in check. The unknown on all of this is the amount of light you're going to have which is the building block of any photograph or video. Also worth noting a small light source will not produce anything flattering. Like a pop up flash on a camera the results are awful.
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
As with any lens, it's generally assumed around f5.6 to f8 will give the best corner to corner sharpness. My concern with filming wide open ie. f1.8 even with a reasonably wide lens is the depth of field you are going to have. Are you wanting the registrars or the couple in focus? Wide open may not give you enough DoF to acheive that and stepping down a couple of stops then can lead to focus hunting on cheaper lens / sensors. Fine line and needs to be tried out and experimented with.
It is of course a compromise, although of course you've quoted for 50mm on a crop sensor where FOV will be too narrow overall I'd have thought. At 35mm F1.8 DOF is larger, but still not huge. That being said I know a lot of photographers that shoot wide open, especially in dimly lit churches and they turn out fine.
While very expensive lens will be able at fully open it will always perform better by simply providing more light. A common FF portrait lens in the 85mm F1.4, now if you at 1.8 then depth of field is only 13cm. Now at f4 you would have 29cm, further the extra stops means the lens is sharper.

The solution is make sure you have enough light or the equipment to add light as necessary (fill light).
I'm not sure what the first line means as shooting wide open does obviously provide the most light.

I personally don't see the point of spending the money on and f1.4 lens only to stop it down to f4, the whole point of the faster lenses (imo) is to let more light it and/or give you the shallow DOF. Maybe many years ago you might have to stop down to get decent sharpness but with modern lenses they can be 'too sharp' wide open meaning for portraits they show every blemish and pore of the skin meaning extra time in photoshop etc to smooth it.
 

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