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Warranty advice please..

RJay

Established Member
Hi,
I bought a JBL On Stage 400p ipod dock from my local electric showroom in Aug 2010 for my daughter.
It stopped playing the ipod and after having a quick look it seemed as the docking point had come away from the circuit board.
The store called my up and said it wouldnt be repaired under warranty as it had been broken.My daughter said all she ever done was dock the ipod and un-dock it (with the correct spacer in place).
Where do I stand with this as my argument is it isnt fit for intended use.

Thanks in advance.

Ray
 

Jenn

Distinguished Member
Because it's been over 6 months since you bought it, it is up to you to prove that the item was not fit for purpose (rather than being damaged).
Have you looked online to see if there are other people with the same problem? If there are it could point to a common fault.

Otherwise you could contact JBL directly who may be more inclined to help.
 

RJay

Established Member
Thanks for the reply, I havent looked online but will do now.
I have also emailed JBL to see what they say.

Ray
 

RobM

Distinguished Member
It is not unreasonable to expect an electrical product to withstand 8 months of normal use, including regular plugging in and unplugging. The warranty will be one year as a minimum, which means you're still covered by it and therefore still covered against manufacturing defects and parts failure.

This has a years warranty at least, it is reasonable to expect it to last at least this long and therefore you are well within your rights to talk the product back to the store you bought it from and ask them to arrange for its repair or replacement.

Under the Sale Of Goods Act it is up to the retailer to manage this warranty claim for you. They will, no doubt, develop sloping shoulders and will get out of it if at all possible. Especially if it's the Dixons Group. Don't let them :)
 

RJay

Established Member
Thanks RobM,
It is not the Dixons group, it is our local electricity store.
The problem I have is that I am in Jersey and as far as I know we have no consumer rights.
Maybe have to visit the CAB.
Its very frustrating, and I believe that JBLs customer service is terrible.

Regards
 

Jenn

Distinguished Member
It is not unreasonable to expect an electrical product to withstand 8 months of normal use, including regular plugging in and unplugging. The warranty will be one year as a minimum, which means you're still covered by it and therefore still covered against manufacturing defects and parts failure.

This has a years warranty at least, it is reasonable to expect it to last at least this long and therefore you are well within your rights to talk the product back to the store you bought it from and ask them to arrange for its repair or replacement.

Under the Sale Of Goods Act it is up to the retailer to manage this warranty claim for you. They will, no doubt, develop sloping shoulders and will get out of it if at all possible. Especially if it's the Dixons Group. Don't let them :)

This issue here is that the retailer claims the damage was caused by the user which is not covered by the warranty.

I'm not sure if this applies in Jersey but here (mainland UK), after 6 months it's up to the buyer to prove that the fault was caused by a manufacturing defect or fault so the retailer would be within their right to refuse to take the item under warranty.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
The probelm stills come down to, was the damaged caused by

(i) Inherent design fault

(ii) Manufacturing fault for that particular item

(iii) Misuse


You can generally decide on (i) by Googling to see if the problem is common.

If it comes down to (ii) and (iii) then I'm afraid it is a confrontation. The retailer has the upper hand because he has your money and can demand that you prove that it was faulty. That leaves you with having to provide a recognised engineer's report and possibly start court action. Your initial investment (which would be returned if you won) could be a significant proportion of the item's value.

So the best approach in the first instance is to appeal to the retailer\manufacturer and hope they they show a gesture of goodwill.

If that fails then you need to decide whether it is worth the fight, initial expense, the time and the risk that you might lose.

I guess if it were me, and the retailer\manufacturer weren't prepared to resolve the problem then I would get it repaired and then try my best to let as many people know about the retailer's and JBL's poor service and quality as possible.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

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