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Wall Thickness?

p203557

Active Member
In the planning stages of a dedicated room on the back of my garage. In weighing up how much of the garden I'll be allowed to build on I think the maximum width for the extension will be 10 foot. Given that what would my internal width of the room be? I'm thinking about 1' per wall but I do want very good insulation and some soundproofing so should I allow a bit more?

At this stage its just a guidline so I have something to work with when attempting to plan the layout of the room.
 

woody67

Active Member
300mm will be a typical cavity wall.

If space is a major consideration, then you could design a dense wall which would meet b/regs for thermal insulation and be better for sound than a typical cavity wall.
This could be approximately 200 to 230mm thick for blockwork or possibly less for timber frame, but it depends on how much you want to spend
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
Just curious, but why not just convert the garage?

10 foot minus brickwork will be around the same size as a 'typical' garage won't it?
 

p203557

Active Member
Ste7en said:
Just curious, but why not just convert the garage?

10 foot minus brickwork will be around the same size as a 'typical' garage won't it?

My house is link detatched (ie only my garage joins onto next doors living room) so not an ideal room for music / HC. In the same plans as adding an Av room to the rear of the garage (which will not directly join next door in anyway) part of the garage will become a utility room off the kitchen. Its a bit hard to explain without a diagram but I know what I mean!! When and if I get plans finalised I'll be creating a thread to chart my progress.
 

Ted White

Active Member
Your best overall success will be to incorporate a mass-airspring-mass system. That's nothing exotic.. a standard wall is built this way.

Build a stud wall a few inches from the existing wall. Insulate and install plasterboard on the theatre side.
 

DUVET

Standard Member
i agree with ted white, conctructed a isolated stud wall with resilient bars, acustic wool is good to stop sound, also even better is a 2FT45 quilt and sound proofing mats.

remember to keep the new stud wall approx 5-10mm away from the exisitng wall, stops sound traveling through.

there are some acoustic membranes on the market now that are ment to be very good, maybe tray them.

plaster board over the stud wall with one or two of the above withing the wall, then plaster, paint and you can scream as load as you can and not one person will hear a thing.

hope this helps.

duvet
Engineering Techincian
 

Ted White

Active Member
If it's an isolated wall, it's already decoupled, and resilient bars will offer no additional decoupling. Simple insulation will work. In a wall, you just can't beat humble fiberglass or mineral wool.

Membranes such as Mass Loaded Vinyl are simply another source of mass. Plasterboard is a cheaper source.

High performance doesn't have to be over complicated or expensive.
 

DUVET

Standard Member
Ted White said:
If it's an isolated wall, it's already decoupled, and resilient bars will offer no additional decoupling. Simple insulation will work. In a wall, you just can't beat humble fiberglass or mineral wool.

Membranes such as Mass Loaded Vinyl are simply another source of mass. Plasterboard is a cheaper source.

High performance doesn't have to be over complicated or expensive.


:eek: :eek: :nono: :eek: :eek:
 

DUVET

Standard Member
Ted White said:
... I'm not following you with the faces, Duvet. You disagree? Have data stating otherwise?

sorry ted if i hurt your feelings, i'm really sorry.


good luck with the work.
 

Ted White

Active Member
...I'm still at a loss there, Duvet.

At any rate please keep in mind that such a decoupled system will perform best above it's resonance point. For example, if you build a shallow wall with no insulation and little mass, you may find that wall has a low frequency resonance point around 90 Hz. That wall will isolate sound much better above 90 Hz than below 90 Hz. So if you have a lot of sound below 90 Hz, you should endeavor to build a wall with a lower resonance point.

Make the stud cavity deeper, space the studs farther apart, insulate the cavity, add more mass to either side. These efforts will lower the resonance point, and make the wall more effective in lower frequencies.
 

mattym

Banned
Duvet i think Ted is talking about an already isolated wall...
 

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