Wall Mounting

whistlingDogg

Standard Member
Can people post their experiences of wall mounting their plasmas please. I like many others I'm sure live in a house with plasterboard walls that dont take much weight and was wondering how people coped woth that. I was thinking that I would have to cut away at the plasterboard and mount onto the bricks underneath but i've got a feeling these are breeze-blocks.
 

codlord

Active Member
whistlingDogg,

I mounted my 42 Plasma onto a wall which was plasterboard over blocks. I hung myself off the wall mount before mounting the plasma and the plasma is still hanging on the wall after several months with no sign of movement :)

It's not a 5 minute job but it's not too difficult. I had to mount into a mixture of the light insulating blocks and the more solid ones , but did not have any problem mounting wall bolts in either.

See my post in this thread:

http://www.avforums.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=44644

It's a bit difficult to explain some parts so feel free to ask questions if its not clear.
 
S

steelej

Guest
Whistleingdog,

On the plasterboard walls there will be a wooden strap going from floor to ceiling to support the plasterboard. There is usually a strap every 16" or so. What I did(or rather my dad who is a joiner) was to attached 2 peices of wood to the wall screwed into 3 of the wooden straps. One piece of wood for the top screw holes the other for the bottom, the plasma mount then screws directly onto the wood that is supported by the solid wooden straps. As I said my dad is a joiner and he said this is a common method for supporting large weights on a plasterboard wall, and I have to say it is completely solid.

John.
 

whistlingDogg

Standard Member
Originally posted by steelej
Whistleingdog,

There is usually a strap every 16" or so.

John.

Lets just hope that there are 3 straps in the right position!

Thanks
 
Be aware that in a lot of modern houses, the 'straps 'might be metal, not wood.

When i was trying to hang some heavy stuff on my internal walls, I expected to find wooden battons, but when I drilled in, they were 'hard'.

A friend of mine recently cut a huge hole in his internal wall, which showed exactly what was inside.

Instead of wooden battons, there was a series of verctical metal strips.

I am not sure if this is true for external walls too, but its something to be aware off, before you go drilling holes.
 

tman

Well-known Member
Gave up trying to put my plasma on the wall! It's a new house, with plasterboard everywhere. Batons seem about 20-30 inches apart on my walls, and I am *not* fixing a plasma onto plasterboard only!!!

It's on a pedestal stand now, on the unit housing the AV gear. Still looks good, but would have looked better on the wall.
 

whistlingDogg

Standard Member
Originally posted by tman
Gave up trying to put my plasma on the wall! It's a new house, with plasterboard everywhere. Batons seem about 20-30 inches apart on my walls, and I am *not* fixing a plasma onto plasterboard only!!!

It's on a pedestal stand now, on the unit housing the AV gear. Still looks good, but would have looked better on the wall.

I really want mine on the wall (image of me stamping my feet). Didi you think of trying what codlord did (see post near the start of this thread)
 

codlord

Active Member
Not sure it matters how heavy duty the fixings are - if they are in plasterboard you run the risk of either the fixings coming away or an entire panel of plasterboard coming away.

I would not want to mount anything that heavy or expensive onto just plasterboard.
 
I fully understand and don't blame you, but you might be surprised how strong the plaster board is.

Many years ago, when I lived with my parents, they bought a 'new' house.

I ended up fixing those adjustable shelves (the ones with the square/slotted poles which fix to the wall with triangle brackets which slot into it).

I fixed them to the plasterboard using metal 'butterfly' fixings (the ones which you poke through the hole and they 'spring' open.

I mounted 3 brackets to the wall, each secured by 4 or 5 fixings each. On the shelft, I had a 29inch TV, a monitor and a load of other stuff..

It weighed a ton and there was a lot of leaverage going on due to the way that the shelf worked.. But that, nor the plasterboard showed any signs of movement.
 

whistlingDogg

Standard Member
Originally posted by Jon Weaver
I fully understand and don't blame you, but you might be surprised how strong the plaster board is.

Many years ago, when I lived with my parents, they bought a 'new' house.

I ended up fixing those adjustable shelves (the ones with the square/slotted poles which fix to the wall with triangle brackets which slot into it).

I fixed them to the plasterboard using metal 'butterfly' fixings (the ones which you poke through the hole and they 'spring' open.

I mounted 3 brackets to the wall, each secured by 4 or 5 fixings each. On the shelft, I had a 29inch TV, a monitor and a load of other stuff..

It weighed a ton and there was a lot of leaverage going on due to the way that the shelf worked.. But that, nor the plasterboard showed any signs of movement.

i tried fixing one of those IKEA shelves that just appear to com out of the wall (no apparent bracket). I used the heavy duty metal plugs and it just ripped holes out of my plasterboard. If the plasma doesn't stick out too far you could probably get away with fixing it directly to the plasterboard, but the pioneer is nearly 40kg so i wouldn't risk it.
 

JamesTapp

Standard Member
The issue is one of structural integrity. Plasterboard doesn't have any, and you are risking a lot using any fixings direct into the Plasterboard.

My house is 6 years old, I have attached the plasma to an outside wall. The plasterboard is attached to aircrete blocks (breeze blocks), which are really designed for heat retention, not hanging heavy weights. The plasterboard is "dabbed" onto the aircrete with plaster, and so there are no wooden batons.

The solution was to buy a length of 3x1, cut it into three lengths the height of the wall bracket, and then cut the plasterboard out of the wall to fit the wooden pieces exactly. (This bit is messy, but a stanley knife and some care is all that is needed, and check for cables first!)

I attached each of the wooden batons to the aircrete blocks using 6x3" No 12 wood screws into heavy duty wallplugs. Lots of No more nails on the back for extra protection! I then attached the plasma display to the wooden batons using the 3" screws and into the pre drilled holes that I had made in the aircrete for the plasma. This has given me 24 screws into the wall through the wood.

Remember that the weight of the plasma causes a shearing force, ie pulling down, so you really need something that has integrity rather than just relying on plasterboard - do you want your plasma hanging from anything that can be cut with a stanley knife?

Hope this helps.

James
 

whistlingDogg

Standard Member
Originally posted by JamesTapp

My house is 6 years old, I have attached the plasma to an outside wall. The plasterboard is attached to aircrete blocks (breeze blocks), which are really designed for heat retention, not hanging heavy weights. The plasterboard is "dabbed" onto the aircrete with plaster, and so there are no wooden batons.


The wall I need to mount on is the wall between me and my neighbour and so I guess this will be just breeze bocks. It does have a cavity between the plasterboard and the breeze blocks though.

Totally agree, i would not be comfortable mounting anything on plasterboard.

This thread sounds a bit like diyforums now :)
 

JamesTapp

Standard Member
WhistlingDogg

The cavity is about 15mm, and the plaster is dabbed around the edges of the plasterboard just to act as glue. If it is not an internal wall, and was of recent construction, it is almost definity done in this way.

tman probably banged on the wall (like I did) and thought there were wooden batons every 20-30". But my father in law (plasterer) put me right, it is the plaster glue at the edge of each board.

Kind Regards,

James
 

whistlingDogg

Standard Member
Originally posted by JamesTapp
WhistlingDogg

The cavity is about 15mm, and the plaster is dabbed around the edges of the plasterboard just to act as glue. If it is not an internal wall, and was of recent construction, it is almost definity done in this way.

tman probably banged on the wall (like I did) and thought there were wooden batons every 20-30". But my father in law (plasterer) put me right, it is the plaster glue at the edge of each board.

Kind Regards,

James

I see. Yes, that makes sense now. I might get someone in to do it. I can just see me ripping plasterboards off the walls
 

whistlingDogg

Standard Member
Originally posted by JamesTapp
WhistlingDogg

The cavity is about 15mm, and the plaster is dabbed around the edges of the plasterboard just to act as glue. If it is not an internal wall, and was of recent construction, it is almost definity done in this way.

tman probably banged on the wall (like I did) and thought there were wooden batons every 20-30". But my father in law (plasterer) put me right, it is the plaster glue at the edge of each board.

Kind Regards,

James

I see. Yes, that makes sense now. I might get someone in to do it. I can just see me ripping plasterboards off the walls
 

JamesTapp

Standard Member
Hey,

My workwork teacher called me lightening, cause I never struck the same place twice.:blush:

It was actually quite simple.

Marked centre of the wall, and hung the mounting bracket in the right place, then marked where the holes needed to go on the plasterboard wall.

Took the 3x1 and cut to height of bracket, and then put against the wall, drew around it and then used a straight edge and stanley knife to cut out the board. Offered the board to the wall, put the mounting bracket back up and remarked the drilling points on the wooden blocks.

The rest as they say is history, just don't push the wooden blocks all the way in until you have drilled and plugged the holes in the wall. Hmm, why didn't someone tell me that....:D

James
 

whistlingDogg

Standard Member
Originally posted by JamesTapp

Took the 3x1 and cut to height of bracket, and then put against the wall, drew around it and then used a straight edge and stanley knife to cut out the board.
James

The plasterboards are quite thick (15mm?) would a stanley knife get through ok?
 

JamesTapp

Standard Member
I used three blades, one for each of the wooden batons to keep it neat. Once you have scored through the paper it is worryingly easy to saw through using the blade.

Jmaes
 
Whistlingdogg,

What happened with your IKEA shelf it totally understandable, as you were getting a lot of leaverage.

Something pressing down on the shelf, would easily have the strength to 'rip' the fixings out of the wall.

However, a wall braket, would screw into the plasterboard, meaning that whole back plate would be pressed into the wall.

There would be little leaverage involved, as the Plasma would have a downwards force.

I would say that its unlikely that the fixings would come out or the Plasterboard would come off the wall.

But, I do understand your reservations.

The 3x1 options seems like a very good idea.. However, cutting a big hole in the platerboard seems a little extreme.

The worry I have found fixing it to the block work behind the plasterboard is their strengh. They are designed for thermal insulation, and not strengh. The fact that you can just dig them out with a blunt instrument, makes me worried about their sitability for hanging heavy items.

Good luck.
 

JamesTapp

Standard Member
Jon,

You are right about the thermal blocks, they aren't great. Hence the no more nails and 3 inch screws, but I for one didn't want my expensive new purchase on the floor when I got up the following day! The shearing force is handled by the wooden blocks, and cause they sit on the plasterboard they can't move.

Extreme, maybe, solid... definately.

James
 

keyser

Standard Member
Wouldn´t it be nice to have a mount piece for a plasma that filters out the vibration from the wall. Because I think many plasma owners have good sounsystems that shake the walls.. and I doubt that shaking vibration does the plasma pixels any good.
 

Dak

Standard Member
We have just had one mounted at work, and they cut out a rectangle in the plasterboard the same size as the plasma then mounted an extending mount on the wall. Once the plasma was mounted on this mount, it was simply pushed back into the wall so that it is almost flush.

V neat indeed - if you can cut in a straight line....
 
M

mikeq

Guest
Be careful if you try this on an external timber framed wall, many of these have a vapour barrier on the other side of the plasterboard to stop water penetration. The last thing you want is a wet Plasma either through water coming through the bricks or condensation forming due to the heat difference.
 
I just remembered a techinique that a colleague showed me.. It doesn't sound very strong, but you might be surprised.

What you need is some doweling and some "No-nails".

First choose your dowel. In this case, I guess that something around 10-12mm would do.

Now drill an EXACT hole, through the plasterboard and into the blockwork behind.. I guess something about 4-6" would do it. It need to be a tight fit, as the dowel is going to go in this hole.

Now use a vaccum and suck out as much dust as possible.

Then pump the hole full of no-nails.

Finally cover the length of dowel in 'no-nails' and tap it in until flush.

Now you can use normal wood screws into the dowel, although you might have to pre-drill first.

I did this to hang a curtain hook and didn't think that it woudl be very strong, but after the no-nails went off, I could almost hang off of it.

I hope this helps.
 

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