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Wall mounting plasmas in new houses

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by Merritt, Feb 5, 2003.

  1. Merritt

    Merritt
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    :hiya:

    Apologies if this has already been done but I am a 'newbie' so can I be excused please :blush:

    I am about to buy the new 42" Panny and would like to wall mount it.... Problem is that I have one of these houses that has entire plasterboard type walls. i.e. plasterboard, .75" air gap, breeze block, 1" air gap, then bricks on the outside... Is it still possible to wall mount the screen?

    Im assuming the safest way would be to put very long bolts through the entire wall and fix fromt the outside of the house?

    Has anyone else done similar?

    Thx

    Steve
     
  2. zAndy1

    zAndy1
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    Interested in the answer to this also as I'd like to wall mount mine too and it's a brand new house. It should be possible but I sure as hell wouldn't like to do it myself!

    Andy
     
  3. themmings

    themmings
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    I'm gonna be doing this to my plasma too (well - as soon as I get my final confirmed order upto Mr Fernand that is - hang in their Joe).

    My plan was to get HD coach bolts - (as a many as the Unicol bracket will handle) and drill them through the plasterboard well into the breeze blocks - although, I wasn't planning on going right on through to the other side (external wall)!

    I think the Unicol bracket can handle 6 - 8 bolts, I'm kinda' hoping this is gonna be enough.

    Net net - the plasma won't be hung on it until I've tried hanging off it :eek:

    Timbo:)
     
  4. Merritt

    Merritt
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    Timbo,

    If you were planning to use coach bolts, how were you only going to go into the breeze block i.e. how are you going to get nuts on the end of the bolt?! (unless you know of some clever device for inserting into breeze blocks from a distance?)

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  5. codlord

    codlord
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    I have done this and it's still hanging there with no problems.

    This has been covered before (do some searches on "plasterboard" etc). but this is what I did:

    I had the usual plasterboard 'glued' onto the blockwork, so there was plasterboard, then a gap, then the blocks.
    This is what you can do:
    1) Drill a big hole (about 20mm diam) in the plasterboard for each bolt so you can get to the blocks.
    2) Drill a hole in the block for the wall bolt (the ones which leave a threaded rod sticking out of the wall).
    3) Fix the wall bolt into the block and tighten.
    4) Cut a small length of metal tubing to go over the thread of the bolt that is now sticking out of the wall - this is so the bracket can be tightened against the bolts and not the plasterboard.
    5) Mount your wall bracket over the threaded rods and attach washers and nuts.
    6) Cut off any excess thread from the wall bolts.
    I used 3 bolts along the top and three along the bottom, and while I was at it I cut a channel in the plasterboard for all the wires and a wall-mounted centre speaker. It's not a 5 minute job but the end result is fantastic and well worth it.
     
  6. tman

    tman
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    Uh, I'd take a step back and check things out first. I wanted to do exactly the same thing in our (new) house. I had it all planned, with the Unicol wall bracket (which is pretty heavy itself).

    I marked out all the wall positions, and started drilling. First hole, straight through the plasterboard like butter (no support there). Drill carried on, and on. Where were the breeze blocks! It turns out there aren't any!!! Most new houses, I know now, use thermalite bricks. Good for insulation, useless for support. They turn to dust when the drill hits them. So, a spot of repair work later, and a call to the supplier to replace the wall bracket with a desktop stand.

    There are, effectively, no supporting walls in my house. Even external ones. All the weight goes down through the (very hard) bricks into the concrete foundations. Even if you could find a bolt to go all the way through to the bricks, you'd still have a lot of unsupported weight at the front. I had nightmares of the plasma litterally tearing the wall down!!!

    Even the studs are so far apart, you can't use them either!

    So the moral is, check your walls VERY carefully, especially so if you are in a new house.
     
  7. themmings

    themmings
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    Perhaps coach bolts is the wrong term. :eek:

    Maybe long HD screw type bolt things, that would be long and strong enough to dig deep into the breeze block and support the plasma.

    Perhaps some one else can chip in here. Drilling through the internal wall right through to the outside wall seems a bit excessive to me - but what do I know, I can't even spell DYI:blush:
     
  8. clam

    clam
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    I'm with Codlord on this one. I used his method after reading one of his earlier posts, and it worked a treat. I did have some expert help with the "sleeve" of "metal tube" over the Rawlbolt, my father is a centre-lathe turner so he made up some stainless spacers for me.
    I went for 8 fixings in the end as I wanted to be REALLY sure, as it turned out you could probably lift the house on the bracket now !:D
    It does however depend on you having good concrete blocks in your wall. like Tman says, if they're Thermalites then I would think twice. I think in general that the Thermailte blocks are white and smooth, so a quick investigation hole in the wall should make it clear.
     
  9. harrisuk

    harrisuk
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    Worth doing a search for posts on this topic. I have seen mounting on stud walls mentioned before. Mine is mounted above the fire place secured using 8 long bolts.

    Old house though so bolted to substantial brickwork.
    42" screens although not as heavy as big CRT screens are still
    30 - 40 KG so make sure it is properly mounted.

    Definate two man job.
     
  10. Merritt

    Merritt
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    Thanks for the replies guys - I guess I need to go and find out if I have breeze or thermalite blocks in my walls!

    Steve
     
  11. codlord

    codlord
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    Another thing to note is that sometimes "hollow" blocks are used - I found some solid and some hollow ones in my wall - although I still managed to fix a wall bolt into the 1 hollow one (but I would not have wanted to mount the screen if they were all hollow).

    As well as a visual inspection prior to starting it may be worth drilling a small hole for each bolt before you start so you can see if the blocks are hollow or not.
     
  12. boltoa

    boltoa
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    I used the "dowel" method as detailed on one of the other thread on this subject. 14mm dowel and 14mm masonary drill required. I cut 8x10cm lengths of dowel, and drilled 8 14mm holes to just over 10cm (inc plasterboard) into the wall (breeze block). Stick quite a bit of "no more nails" into the hole, then hammer the dowel in until it is flush with the plasterboard. You can use the no more nails as filler if there are gaps around the holes as well. Then used 90mm pan-head wood screws with washers and mount the wall mount. After allowing 24hrs for the glue to cure, I chin-uped my own 110kg weight off the wall mount :) with absolutely no movement. I deemed this good enough for a 35kg plasma. Now had it up 2 months with no probs. And I don't expect any.

    Just one more alternative method, but I reckon this was easier than all the metal spacer stuff. All materials from B&Q.

    Andrew
     
  13. Merritt

    Merritt
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    Andrew - that sounds like it may work irrespective of breeze blocks or thermalite & I like the sound of it.... Did you buy the 14mm dowel & if so where from ?

    Steve
     
  14. greyt

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    I have installed a Panasonic 42" onto a plasterboard wall glued to thermalite. I used the Unicol tilting wall bracket.

    Being sad, I have photos of the various parts of the installation and have the details of the bolts and special fixant used.

    If anyone is interested I can post the photos and details to my web site at the weekend.

    Basically Rawlplug make a bolt for thermalite and a special "gel". The gel is put in the drill hole in the thermalite, this is partially absorbed by the thermalite and sets very quicky to strengthen the hole and encases the bolt. The gel is horrible stuff but does the job. You have to work quicly to get the bolt in before the gel sets.

    I Cut the plasterboard away, fixed 10mm mdf to the thermalite using the bolts. Then mounted the bracket using bolts going through the mdf into the thermalite. Maybe overkill but it isn't going to fall in a hurry!

    Only place I could find the kit was the builders merchants Travis Perkins.

    Graham
     
  15. Merritt

    Merritt
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    Graham :smashin: I'd love those instructions / details please... Don't forget to post your URL ;)

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  16. TheBigApple

    TheBigApple
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    I fit CCTV equipment for a living and have to install monitors on wall brakets which are a damn site heavier than any plasma i've seen.

    There really is a simple way to mount heavy equipment even on walls with thermalite block behind the plaster. Similar to Greyt's method but without using that gel, which is a pain in the arse.

    1.Mark up holes.
    2.Drill holes with a 7mm drill about 100mm deep.
    3.Get some Gripfill or no more nails and push the nozzle as far into each hole as possible and squirt away.
    4.Put a brown rawlplug into each hole.
    5.Wind a big screw ( about 85mm long ) about two turns into each rawlplug.
    6.Using a precision tapping stick, tap each rawlplug into the hole until about 50mm of screw is left sticking out of the hole.This will have pushed the rawlplug into the thermalite block along with the Gripfill.
    7.Leave to set ( Gripfill will set strong enough to hold in about 4 hours )
    8.You can now unscrew the screws leaving the rawlplugs set in the wall and then fix the bracket on the wall with the screws and a washer on each screw.

    If you then need to take the bracket down e.g. if you sell the house or want to move the plasma, all you need to do is fill the holes rather than replaster the wall.

    Hope this helps

    Monkeyboy73
     
  17. StooMonster

    StooMonster
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    Frame fixers

    Even though I have an old house, and 50" plasma is hung above the fireplace attached with 160mm bolts and polyester-resin (not going anywhere), there are parts of my house that have been extended. In these parts there are plaster board on battons with a gap and then brick, I use nylon frame fixers (with grip-fill) to attach heavy items to these walls; they have heavy ribbing to ensure a tight hold even in weak materials such as aerated blocks.

    Perhaps you could also use the battons in the wall as support.

    Check ScrewFix for your options http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?ts=89094&cId=5

    StooMonster
     
  18. yasa22

    yasa22
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    Seems like everyone is having fun with New house.

    I mounted mine as follows.

    Drilled all the way through to the outside wall.
    Bought 3 6mm threaded rods, using the securing bolts supplied by Philips, Spale (can't spell) bolts. I inserted them the wrong way round into the holes on the outside.

    Inserted and cut the rods to approx correct size, then tightened from the inside using two nuts locked on the end of the rod going through the mounting whole on the bracket.

    The Spale bolts open and lock onto the brick as they tighten. I could hang of each and there was no moment. So I considered this safe enough to hang the Philips plasma on.

    Finally I cut the extra length of threaded rod and cemented over the wholes on the outside of the Wall.

    I have also mounted a 14" TV and a video onto a plasterboard wall just using the heavy duty plugs that open out as they are tightened and that is still hanging some 5 years on.
     
  19. bluebear

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  20. mikeq

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    If securing through to an outside wall (through a cavity) be careful as moisture can travel along anything which bridges the cavity and find it's way into the house (plasma:eek:) . Should be okay with threaded stuff as the moisture should run around the thread and fall off the bottom of the bolt/rod.
     
  21. kevshed

    kevshed
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    Hi all,

    I mounted my panasonsic 42" to a stud wall ... had no issues so far (1 year on).

    Find the studs in the wall, i was lucky that i had a center stud, bang in the middle of wall. 12" centres on the studs, meant i had to put additional fixing holes in the panasonic bracket. In the end, i used 8(i think), plasterboard fixings into the wall itself, followed by another 8 fittings into the studs (had to make holes in the bracket).. i think its easy to get over worried, all the weight is sheer on a plasma, so there is little leverage to help pull it down.

    Kev
     
  22. boltoa

    boltoa
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    Merritt, got all materials including dowel from B&Q. They're usually with the wood trim type stuff (dados and edging). Total cost was under a tenner and I think it took less than an hour, plus curing time for the glue. Pretty easy.

    Oh, forgot to mention I drilled small (2mm IIRC) pilot holes in the dowel for the screws as they were pretty big, but that might not be totally necessary.

    Andrew
     
  23. Phil_Yeoman

    Phil_Yeoman
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    It really is not a good idea to bolt trough to the outside wall. Although plasmas are relativly heavy you dont have to go crazy with securing them the wall.

    Remember they are static and because they are thin they produce very little pulling force on the fixing (force produced by having center of gravity a distance away from the support point). Suprisingly the plaster board itself would quite happily support the weight although following the laws of physics when supporting £4000 of equipment wouldn't give you a peacfull nights sleep.

    The best solution I have found is to use injection fixing and treaded studs. The fixing actually streanthens the block so you dont have to worry about cracking etc. I then wind on a nut to act as a back spacer and finally put the bracket onto the studs using nilon nuts. You can buy all the stuff from screwfixdirect.com

    How strong is this stuff, well it is used to hold up the roofs in mines :smashin:

    Phil
     
  24. bluebear

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    mikeq/Phil_Yeoman,

    You are correct about moisture crossing the cavity, I was also warned about this by my building friend.

    but mikeq has a good point about the threaded bar stopping the moisture running around the thread to the plasterboard, that I had not thought about before.

    I did also seal it at both ends, but one thing I forgot to do is to PAINT it !!

    The dry-lined walls in a new house are Not very good at holding heavy weights, the insulating breeze blocks are like powder, you would be lucky to mount a xmax card on them!

    I know the threaded bar to the outside wall is over kill, but it gives me a good nights sleep after watching a night of viewing on my brilliant Panny D4.

    If you have a studded wall, then you don't have a problem, just fix the mount to the wooden batons.

    Running the cables in the wall is another story, but well worth the trouble...

    Have Fun,

    Bluebear.
    :smashin:
     
  25. big.hal

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    I've got mine fitted to the plasterboards using heavy duty rawlplug expanding plasterboard bolts. Its been on the wall now for 7 months and still there!!.
     
  26. harrisuk

    harrisuk
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    It is at times like these you appreciate the build quality and construction of Victorian built houses.

    Mounting one of these on a brick chimney breast is and easy easy thing in comparison to what has been discussed in this tread.

    very scary........
     
  27. StooMonster

    StooMonster
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    I'd keep my fingers crossed if I were you ... one of my friend's neighbours attatched a 50Kg CRT to plasterboard with heavy duty rawlplug expanding plasterboard bolts, they came home one day and not only was tv on floor but plasterboard was snapped in half (and the boards next to it); pulled down half their living room wall in their new build house.

    Also, my local hi-fi dealer told me about a customer of theirs who hung their plasma as you descibe; they had a similar experience but with shattered plasma on the floor. :eek:

    StooMonster
     
  28. greyt

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    Steve,

    I have put a few pictures at http://greyt.inetcam.com/TV/index.htm

    The site will be slow since it is over satellite broadband :-(

    The main picture of interest is the Rawlplug bolt that is designed for Thermalite.

    Graham
     
  29. Phil_Yeoman

    Phil_Yeoman
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    greyt

    This bolt is an expanding bolt. These are nor good for thermalite as they tend to shatter the block. It would be better to use treaded rod as this causes not reasure on the blocks structure other than that needed to suport the load.

    Phil
     
  30. greyt

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    Phil,

    You are right that a normal expanding bolt is no good for Thermalite.

    Rawlplug claim these bolts are specially designed for thermalite. If you look at the design of them you will see that they expand only by a few mm. I think this is more to seat the bolt in the hole than really grip tight which a normal expanding bolt would do.
     

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