Volume Advice needed.

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by Marshy87, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. Marshy87

    Marshy87
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    Hey members,

    I have a pair of MS 902i bookshelf speakers which I use alot for listening to music (connected to a Cambridge A5 amp). The type of music is quite loud, in terms of bass (Drum n Bass, RnB, Hip hop etc) and I personally listen to all my music on quite a loud volume..I guess you could say that I don't think listening to music is worth it unless its loud.

    Anyway, to the point. When I have my music on, the cones on my speakers do vibrate quite alot, sometimes 'extend' quite far out, due to the low bass frequencies used in the types of music I listen to.

    I'm worried that if I listen to my music at this volume (it isn't ear-shattering volume, but quite loud) my speakers might break. I do have a subwoofer on order to take control of the bass, but still..in general..my speakers won't break, will they?
     
  2. BlueWizard

    BlueWizard
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    I think as long as the cone travel is LESS THAN 1 inch, you are probably OK...maybe. Keep in mind that if you drive your speakers so hard that the voice coil leaves the magnet, there is a chance that it will miss falling back on to the magnet slot, in which case, you will hear a very painful and expensive crunching sound.

    But let's take this from a different perspective, what is the rated power of your amp, what is the rated power of your speaker, and MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL, how far are you turning the Volume Control, and where are the Bass/Treble controls set?

    If LOUD to you is 40% to 60% turn of the Volume Control, and your amp isn't hugely overpowered, they it is probably OK. If you are up around 70% turn of your Volume Control, then regardless of your amps power, you are in dangerous territory.

    Again, this depends on the input signal. I generally find A/V sources to be lower than Audio sources. For example, I play my TV though my stereo at half volume, but I play my turntable through the same amp at about a quarter volume for casual listening.

    Now, I could look up the specs on all your equipment, but you can look them up just as easily.

    Also, until you give us some real world perspective on 'loud'', we can't really say if their is a problem.

    Steve/bluewizard
     
  3. Ightenhill

    Ightenhill
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    Steves correct.. We need to kow how much your asking of the amp and how big your room is in order to know what "loud" is. Bear in mind this music can be recorded rather hot anyway.

    PS. If your creating a shouty sound or boxed sound (especially on the vocals) you have gone to loud or the speakers need repositioning or you need a bigger room and speakers.
     
  4. Marshy87

    Marshy87
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    Well I'm at work at the moment so I can't post pics.

    My amps volume control is turned up less than half way, and I usually have my bass control up a bit too (less than halfway to 'full' bass). My amp is 60watts per channel, and my speakers are 100watts. I wouldn't say they exceeded an 'inch' out of the box, but I'm generally just worried that they might break (as alot of people would be when you spend so much money on a pair of speakers). Usually when they 'vibrate' I just think to myself "Thats what they were made for".

    Thanks
     
  5. Cynar

    Cynar
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    At these settings you should be well within safe limits and have no need to worry. If you use the volume control sensibly (i.e. slowly) you'll usually hear the sound become unpleasant and distorted as your amp/speakers reach their limits before any actual damage occurs.
    Your speaker cones are meant to move - if they didn't they wouldn't work!
     
  6. Marshy87

    Marshy87
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    Hah, exactly. Whenever I listen to bass-filled music and my speaker cones go crazy I always get a bit worried, but then again why do you think a rubber ring is placed on the outside of the cone lol.

    Then again, I could just forget about this by keeping the covers on my speakers:D

    Thanks alot
     
  7. BlueWizard

    BlueWizard
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    Given the information in your post, you are well within the normal range and have nothing to worry about.

    First, about the length of travel of the cone, remember you are seeing both forward and backward movement. With no sound the output of your amp is at 0 (zero) volts and your speaker is in what we will call the neutral position.

    When a bass notes arrive at the speaker terminal, the voltage rises in a positive direction, and the speaker moves forward, then falls back to the neutral or zero volt position, as the next half-cycle appears, the voltage goes negative and the speaker moves backwards, and finally as the note subsides, it moves back to the neutral zero volt position. So, my point is, take half the movement you see, and that is the movement in any one direction.

    If the speaker is being stretched forward to its limits, or if it is falling backward to it limits, you will here what I can only describe as a 'brappy' distortion. Yes, I know 'brappy' doesn't help much. Think of shaking a stiff piece of cardboard and the sound it might make, now think of a violent version of that, and you will be close. You will hear the distortion at the extremes of cone travel before you will see damage, at least in most cases.

    Now the final point, there is a 'trick' of sorts to making small speakers sound big. My 12" woofers move a lot of air, so they don't have to move as far to fill the room with sound. Small speaker are usually what are know as 'long throw woofers'. That is, to make up for being small, which also causes the cone to be stiffer, all other things being equal, the speakers have been design to move far and hard to make up for their lack of surface area.

    In short, what I am saying, is that I think your speakers are designed to have this 'long throw' in order to make up for their lack of surface area. The long throw makes these small speakers sound big.

    Anyone care to dispute these statements?

    Steve/BlueWizard
     
  8. Nobber22

    Nobber22
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    I agree with Blue Wizard. Your amp and speakers are a good match and you'll hear distortion in the sound long before you do permanent physical damage to the cones. Just so long as you turn the sound down a bit when you hear the distortion kick in.........:D
     

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