Voltex power saving scam

mike7

Distinguished Member
Anyone who uses the internet cannot fail to come across a pop-up advert for a device from a firm called VOLTEX who are marketing a device which they claim will spectacularly reduce your electricity bill. This product is a simple plug-in device that you connect to a power socket, a green light will display and you, apparently, can kiss goodbye to high bills. This device, and similar ones under other brand names is a scam, pure and simple. The advertising material is, unintentionally, laughable and is designed to fool the uninitiated into thinking they have stumbled on something very technical and exciting. Advertising claims include reference to Tesla engineering and Austrian scientists. One shows an electricity meter which claims that a £200+ bill can be reduced to something in the region of 10%. Another picture representation displays a selection of electrical components which bear no relation the actual product on offer. One showed a small mains transformer wired to two standard crocodile clips by flimsy wire. Another showed what appears to be a small electric motor attached to a transformer and then to a mains distribution socket. A simpler one shows a standard trip switch fuse module which most people will have in their fuse box. All this is utter nonsense.

For anything around £50 and upwards you will be buying a plastic box, with a potentially unsafe non-standard mains contacts, which contains components costing little more than a few pence. The primary function of the circuitry is to illuminate the green LED light that is supposed to signify that the device is saving you money. There may be a capacitor across the mains input which claims to smooth out the current. It may do this, but is very unlikely to do anything for your power consumption. There are numerous You Tube videos showing a breakdown of these products. All come to the same conclusion that this is a complete scam. They are utterly worthless. No matter how much you try to tell the agency publishing these adverts they persist in appearing. You have been warned. If something sounds too good to be true, then it usually is.

 
Last edited:

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
You're probably preaching to the church here.

I remember some previous boxes that claimed to affect the power factor correction of connected appliances, so that the meter registered less energy usage.

They were probably about as effective...
 

mike7

Distinguished Member
Never the less, people are still buying idiot products like this and the internet is plagued with adverts pushing these deceptions on the less tech savvy public. Perhaps there should be a additional section to the forum where notifications of bogus offers and gadgets can be posted to warn the uninitiated.
 

KillerToaster

Novice Member
Unfortunately this scam is still going strong, my own Grandfather actually fell for this exact product last week and paid £50 for a completely useless device.

The vast majority of people can tell just from the product website that it is obviously a scam, but at a time like this with energy prices going through the roof, a lot of older, perhaps less internet savvy people, are going to fall for it. Just like my Grandfather did.

As much as the Original Post may be "preaching to the church" as somebody has already commented, a lot of people come to websites and forums like this to find out if these products are scams or not, so its up to us to raise the alarm and inform those who aren't in the know.

Just to be clear, Voltex, or "Motex" (the company has changed its name several times) is a complete scam and it will not save you any money on your electricity bill.

If you want cheaper electricity bills, reduce your electricity usage and buy some LED bulbs.
Thank me later.
 

mike7

Distinguished Member
The adverts that pop up for this useless device have taken another turn. The current one implies that you should use a metal nail to be inserted into a live mains socket with a pair of pliers. It's nonsense of course, but it gives the impression to the uninitiated that there is something in doing this to bring down your power bills. Actually you would be at risk of death if you tried this so I suppose you might never have to worry about paying another bill!
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
These adverts are designed to attract stupid people, but perhaps they are now taking this to the next level and aiming at anti-vaxers and 5G conspiracy theorists..
 

The latest video from AVForums

Panasonic LZ2000, LZ1500 & LZ980 Hands-on Launch Event | No QD-OLED for 2022, new 77-inch for LZ2000
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom