Voice Lavalier Microphone to use with Sony CX700 for Car Review Videos?

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by shmee150, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. shmee150

    shmee150
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    Hi all,

    For a while I've been shooting YouTube videos about cars; event coverage, random clips here and there - all sorts really! I currently use a Sony CX700 with a Rode Videomic Pro that do the job absolutely fantastically for my uses until now.

    In growing my YouTube channel I'm hoping to move more into filming myself talking about cars and have started trying to do this using the VMP but it doesn't really work. I will embarrass myself by saying to see here for an example:

    Ferrari 458 Italia 'Scuderia' Lookalike




    What I'm hoping to find is a wireless lavalier microphone that will do this job perfectly, for the time being I can't see having a need for a lavalier and the main audio at the same time but I'd like to not completely break my bank!

    The choices so far seem to be the Sony WCS-999 for £110 or the Shure PG14/PG185 for £170, but in an ideal world I'd like to spend under £100 for something that will do the job quite well, as at the end of the day this is just for YouTube videos!

    For my circumstances it will be mostly in quiet settings, sometimes with cars driving past. I will most certainly be moving (if that causes noise?) and it will almost always be outside and therefore wind could be an issue?

    Does anybody have any advice or input as to what I should be buying?

    Many thanks for your time,

    Tim
     
  2. doug_1986

    doug_1986
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    Hi there,

    Personally I have never used the ones you have linked so I can't really comment on them - I have only ever used Sennheiser gear when it comes to lavaliere mics / transmitters etc (for one reason or another!).

    The Sennheiser stuff is always great, but costs an awful lot more than £100.

    I've never tried this exactly, but have you considered a good lavaliere mic, plus a small voice recorder with a mic input? So for instance, something like this, plus a recorder like this, with the mic clipped onto you and the recorder in your back pocket or on your belt or something. Coming in at £85, you get the portability of wireless sound, plus 16-Bit PCM .WAV. Obviously look around, I'm not saying that's the only or the best option, but it's an idea.

    As far as synching goes, just roll the camera and audio recorder and clap your hands in vision of the camera, then match the hand clap on video and on the audio. Nice and easy!

    Ah, for wind just get a mic with a little mini wind-muff on it, or clip it inside your shirt. The latter usually works fine for me. Also these miss tend to eliminate quite a bit of background noise, so keep your Videomic on the camera still.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2012
  3. 12harry

    12harry
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    What doug_1986 says is good sense, most Pros use sennheiser because it's robust. Tie-mics are most common as they suffer less from clothing-noise. Don't forget to take spare batteries!
    However, I wonder if there isn't a cheaper/better solution . . . try one of those headsets with mic. - this means it will be close-sound, which is always a good start. The wiring should plug into the camcorder mic-input.
    This removes the agro of syncing and the headphone will make you look like a pro.

    Wind-noise is an issue outside, so a furry dead-cat or similar will help a lot, but standing behind some shelter will work wonders, but that may wreck the best angles.

    I'm just not quite sure why OP wants to use a wireless mic - esp as he needs to be quite near the camera, so he can be sure of being in the shot. OR is there an assistant available...he doesn't say .

    Alternatively do the "to camera" bits in the studio using "green screen techniques", this has the advantage you can repeat the dialogue if it isn't perfect. I think OP should consider this technique before spending ££ots on wireless audio. It is a technique that can work wonders when it's cold outside, wet/windy and you can do "reviews of the Year", etc. from the comfort of yr home studio . . . . . . er, FWIW.
    Most Editing packages allow for chroma-key operation.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012
  4. shmee150

    shmee150
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    I had noticed the Sennheiser gear and the price had scared me away, I'm certainly not looking to spend that much on something - I'll stick to use the Rode Videomic unless there's a very affordable solution otherwise.

    However the other option of using another device is certainly quite possible. I'm not fussed about making the sound the best it can possibly be as these are YouTube uploads anyway and it loses a lot when it gets there. That leads towards the possibility of using any portable voice recorder just with an extension microphone connected and an appropriate mini-deadcat on it. I've never been too keen on the clap-technique because I try and film in a way that needs the minimum editing possible but I can see it working for this purpose so will investigate.


    I certainly wouldn't consider myself pro, I'm not earning significantly from the venture so likewise don't want to invest too heavily in it.

    Most of my ventures mean a complete lack of control over the venue so it won't be easy to hide in shelter, and likewise with a cable connected microphone to the camera, it will be visible in shot as well as quite awkward I think - especially with bad weather or whatnot - think a muddy field.

    I wouldn't be able to fit a greenscreen studio anywhere in my home (not to mention cost) and I'm usually pretty happy to get the words right first time, I don't yet have plans to talk too much so I'm leaning towards the first suggestion of using a separate voice microphone attached to a recorder in my pocket and putting it together afterwards.



    Thanks for the suggestions though, hugely appreciated, my job now will be to look for a recorded and a lavalier microphone, any suggestions?
     
  5. gaddster

    gaddster
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    Hi

    I'm in a similar position, I have gone for a rode lavalier and a zoom H4N recorder. I also bought a rodeo vieomic pro too. I am using the wired solution (bought a rode extension cable). I will probably buy a shure slx1 belt pack as I already have the shure slx4 wireless receiver( I'm in the entertainment industry so already had a radio mic system. Whether this setup will be practical only time will tell BUT so far, this advice on this forum has been absolutely spot on.
     

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