VM - Wi-Fi extender / Access point?

AlexGregs

Novice Member
Hello,

We currently have a Virgin Media Super-Hub, but am looking to extend Wi-Fi coverage to a small building / man-cave in our garden that contains a TV etc. Initial approach is to hard wire (via a Cat 5 cable) from the virgin router in the house across and direct into a Smart TV.

However we would also like to utilize Wi-Fi in there as well, but am after some advice re: what we should be connecting into / out of. A friend has advised that the Cat 5 should go into a switch box and then subsequently into the TV, but I'm not sure what next?

TP links (in the outside building have been suggested), but there are lots of different options and we simply want to provide some type of access point that our phones can connect to for example?

Could anyone suggest the best approach here and specific piece of kit to help connect? I did read somewhere that certain devices aren't compatible with Virgin?

Due to the distance involved I do not want to go via the VM Intelligent Wi-Fi booster path due to the on-going cost each month and I'm not confident this would work, hence the hard wire approach.

Apologies for the long-winded request, but tech isn't my thing and all a bit of a mine-field.

Any help / advice appreciated.

Thanks

Alex
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
Your friend is correct. Armoured cat 6 cable from house to garden building. Connect into a switch. Switch connect to TV. Switch connect to wireless access point to provide WiFi.
 

AlexGregs

Novice Member
Your friend is correct. Armoured cat 6 cable from house to garden building. Connect into a switch. Switch connect to TV. Switch connect to wireless access point to provide WiFi.
Thanks Mushii. Is there a particular brand / model type that I should be looking at for the AP? TP Link 1350 was one that I'd seen, but there is that many?

We aren't talking about a large area, but just want to make sure it works.

Appreciate your help.
 

sep8001

Well-known Member
Using a switch + AP is a better solution, however if you have another spare router you can make that into a switch and use it as a wifi ap as well.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Using a switch + AP is a better solution, however if you have another spare router you can make that into a switch and use it as a wifi ap as well.

Further to that - there's an FAQ called "Using Two Routers Together" pinned in this forum that describes how to go a about "crippling" a SOHO "router" and turning it into a switch-AP combination. Some newer "routers" have a "one click" option in their UI that does it for you.

There's nothing "wrong" with using a separate switch and AP, but "crippling" a SOHO router (or buying one with an "AP mode") is a neat way to create a switch-AP combi in a single device (which of course saves you a mains socket.) Especially if you have an old router lying around you can re-deploy for nothing.

When sizing the number of physical switch ports, don't forget to include the uplink in the count - I've seen people forget it.

Generally in data networks, it's a good idea to get as much as possible onto wired ethernet as it leaves more "air time" available for the remaining Wi-Fi devices thereby improving the speed of their usage experience. Wired ethernet is also much faster and more reliable that Wi-Fi. Things that don't move - like a TV - are ideal candidates.

Wi-Fi transmit power is limited by law and most kit is, and always has been, using the permitted max. - by design it's not very loud. So don't stress too much about the Tx power of this device versus that - there are differences, but they are not as great as you might think. Mostly you are looking for the feature set such as a protocols supported (a/b/g/n/ac/ax) number of antenna chains (which effects speeds for n/ac/ax) and any other "features" you might be interested in (such as the aforementioned "one click AP mode" which simplifies setup.) Of course, you can ask here.

BTW - if you haven't run your cable yet, you might want to consider running two. It's extremely unlikely UTP will fail in service, but if it does and you have an alternate in situ, you can get back up and running again fairly quickly. If not, you are off the air until you rip and replace. Of course, it adds to the materials cost, but cable is cheap compared to the cost (hassle) of installing it. AVF Mantra is to "always run two."

There are presently some professional infrastructure installers frequenting this forum, so I'm sure they would be happy to advise on (for example) the merits of direct buried cable versus running in ducts, what to buy for outdoor use, how to dress the building entry and so on. Just ask if you need help.
 
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oneman

Well-known Member
TP link will be absolutely fine.
I've suggested on OP's other post the TPLink Archer c5 is currently £40 on amazon. Its not amazing and I probably won't have it as my main router but its ideal for OP in this instance and has a AP mode for easy setup. It will give them 3 x 1gb Ethernet and 2.4GHz and 5 GHz hotspot. I would probably set it up as separate SSID to the house WiFi but to be honest I suspect there isn't going to be much over laptop with house WiFi.
 

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