Virgin Media using my home network

Discussion in 'Cable TV & Virgin Media TV' started by Whosaninja, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. Whosaninja

    Whosaninja
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    Hi.
    Hopefully someone can help with some cable questions regarding sending Virgin media round the house. I have never used Virgin previously

    I have just moved to a refurbished house which has 2 cat6 and 2 coax cables running to each room from the loft. None of the rooms are connected to each other but I will get that sorted later.

    I was planning on getting Sky (feed into the loft and send the signal to each room) and BT Infinity but I think we will have a problem with the Sky signal due a tree and church spire. If this is the case I am probably going to get Virgin Media (for TV and Phone) so that only one person digs up my drive.

    - First noob question, does the internet and TV use the same cable, ie from the hub can I connect the internet to the cat6 and TV to the coax or does both signals travel down the same line?
    - If the TV goes via Coax will I be able to feed the TV through the house in the same manner as Sky (assuming a decoder in each room), once I link the cables in the loft?

    Apologies if this has been answered elsewhere
    Cheers
    Whosaninja
     
  2. dante01

    dante01
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    The cable feed that comes into the house from the street carries both cable TV and internet, but the cable is split inside the house and you don't connect the STBs to the Superhub. The SuperHub simply deals with the internet and your Home LAN and isn't responsible for cable TV distribution.

    Virgin Media cable is a digitallly encrypted signal and you need a cable STB to decrypt it. After the signal is decrypted then it is output to a TV via the STB. If you want to distribute the TV output of one STB throughout you home then you need to first decide whether you want HD or RF distribuition? You cannot distribute HD TV via RF and coax directly.

    If you want an STB in each room then talk to Virgin and they will lay the required cabling when they install the STBs. If using more than one STB then the signal strength may need adjusting. This is something you cannot do and requires the intervention of Virgin Media. The signal to each STB is split from the main feed that enters your home and will require digital quality RG6 coax from the main feed to each room that has an additional Virgin STB. A Virgin Media installer may refuse to use cabling you've installed, especially if running to every room and if you've only asked for one or two STBs. The ends of unused coax terminations really need to be capped in order to avoid them picking up interference. Your planned coax distribuition could actually degrade the signal associated with the STB or STBs being used in other rooms if you use that distribuition throughout the house and you STBs are connected up to it. You also cannot use the same coax distribuition to distribute other RF signals in conjunction with the cable TV signals..
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2014
  3. Whosaninja

    Whosaninja
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    Thanks dante01
    I was ideally looking for HD in each room, but possibly I'm getting ahead of myself. Will the cable have writing on it identifying it as RG6 coax or otherwise?

    What I have mainly taken away is to speak to Virgin first and let them know what I want to do
     
  4. dante01

    dante01
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    It may have writing on it, but there's nothing to say it has to. You buy it as being digital coax. The term "RG-6" itself refers to a wide variety of cable designs, which differ from one another in shielding characteristics, center conductor composition, dielectric type and jacket type. The term RG-6 is now generally used to refer to coaxial cables with an 18 AWG center conductor and 75 ohm impedance.

    Virgin Media use RG6 Alluminium Tri Shielded cable in black or white. Tri shielded cable is hard to come by and Virgin have their's specifically made for them. The equivalent, which exceeds Virgin's spec is the copper tri sheilded Webro HD100

    HD100 Class A+ TV & Satellite Coax Cable | Webro - Webro
     
  5. Whosaninja

    Whosaninja
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    I'll check out the coax tonight to see if I can indentify what cable it is. Supposedly the previous owner was going to get Virgin installed so you would have to hope the cabling was adequate, but so far all we have had is issues
     
  6. Whosaninja

    Whosaninja
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    The Coax cables are Webro WF100. According to that website it is ideal for Sky, but no mention of Cable/Virgin...
     
  7. dante01

    dante01
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    Its basically the same cabling. Both sat and cable TV require low loss digital coax.
     

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