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vinyl into my laptop

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by DustySox, Jul 5, 2005.

  1. DustySox

    DustySox
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    Hi

    I have lots of vinyl (from my Dj'ing days...who wasn't!!). i still have my decks/mixer etc. I want to record vinyl into my laptop, and i havn't a clue how to do this. I have a headphone socket output which enables me to play itunes etc through mixer.There is a mic socket on laptop (although I doubt it's stereo) and various usb ports.

    the laptop is a Compaq M2130EA

    Any help would be greatly apprecited

    ATB

    Darren
     
  2. DustySox

    DustySox
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  3. nwgarratt

    nwgarratt
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    No, you need a preamp.

    As the sound levels from a record player are low, they need to raised. This is done by using a pre-amp. The player connects to the preamp and then the output of the preamp goes to the PC with a suitable cable (usually a two phono to 3.5mm jack). That connects to the line in on the PC.

    There are battery operated preamps that would work without too much messing about.

    Is there a preamp in the mixer?
     
  4. rhinoman

    rhinoman
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  5. nwgarratt

    nwgarratt
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    That looks like a good link.

    If you have a amp with a phono input. That can be used to amp the sound and then use it's tape out to the computer.
     
  6. jon stallard

    jon stallard
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    I did this for a mate a year or so ago, the biggest problem with transferring from vinyl to MP3 is you have to get gaps between the tracks so you need software that will do this (otherwise you end up with one MP3 file for each side of an album).

    I did it with a USB Soundblaster Audigy I think it was that came with not only the right software but could take two phono connections from the deck (this one had the equalising pre amp built in - if going from deck to mixer desk, the mixer will almost certainly contain the right pre amps) into a USB port and thus onto your hard drive.

    I think however that things have probably moved on since and I think the micrsoft media digital extra malarkey thing (plus! I think it's called) has software for copying off of vinyl anyway.

    But.... mind the gaps.

    Jon.
     
  7. Maff et1

    Maff et1
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    Been doing this myself on a desktop PC.

    Record player -> preamp -> amp -> pc line in (via amp tape loop)
    Then pc (line out) -> amp tape loop.

    This allows you to switch the tape loop monitor in and out to hear any destortion.

    You can get software to split tracks by listening for the gaps or you can do it by hand. Record into one big wave file. Then split it into a wav for each track and clean them up.

    If you record at stereo 16 bit 44.1khz then the resulting wav files can be used to make an audio cd.
     
  8. nwgarratt

    nwgarratt
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    The easiest way to do the gaps is to record each side as one big track. Then use software such as Sound Forge to edit the track and split it up into the separate tracks. Any software that shows the wave form should be ok. I think Cool Edit can also be used.
     

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