Vintage Speaker Advice

alinaqvi

Novice Member
Hi,

I've got a pair of Wharfedale Laser 80 speakers which are well over 35 years old that I bought on eBay about 4 years ago for £20. They're fantastic when they're cranked up with a great solid base but I have a few questions which I can't seem to get any definitive advice on:
1. The cone on one of the bass drivers is very loose. Can I get this be easily fitted by a repair shop? Or should I get a new 200mm bass drive unit?
2. With the advancements in technology over the last 40 years, will a new bass unit sound significantly better if I replace it?
3. Will I need to then replace the other bass driver?
4. If I do need to replace the bass driver, what would you recommend - I want to achieve at least an equal rich bass sound as I have now?
5. I don't know what they should sound like when they were new. Currently, they sound at their best when they're loud. So when they're at a lower volume I feel they're not so good but I obviously don't really know. Someone said to me that the bass drivers are very good quality and should last for another 40 years??. He thought that it might be worth me getting the crossovers rebuilt and that I would be amazed at the difference. Can anyone explain what this is and if it really will make a difference?
Thanks
Ali
 

Paul7777x

Member
Winslow Audio may be able to source and fit new cone surrounds and build replacement x-overs.

And, I’d certainly have the x-overs rebuilt after thirty plus years, they’ll be all over the place by now.

 

alinaqvi

Novice Member
Winslow Audio may be able to source and fit new cone surrounds and build replacement x-overs.

And, I’d certainly have the x-overs rebuilt after thirty plus years, they’ll be all over the place by now.

Thanks for the advice. Out of interest, what are crossovers and what difference do they make to the sound?
 

Paul7777x

Member
Thanks for the advice. Out of interest, what are crossovers and what difference do they make to the sound?

A x-over is a board populated by various electrical components.

It sits in a speaker box and is attached to the speaker terminals.

It’s purpose, simply put, is to separate the signal the speakers receive from the amplifier into two (or more) separate signals.

In a stereo, two driver speaker the x-over will split the signal into two parts, one at above (very nominally) around 3000Hz to be fed to the tweeter.

The other, below the chosen frequency, will be sent to the mid/bass driver.

The x-over has other duties related to timing and phase change too.

An old one, in your case a very old one, will have virtually none of its original values intact.
 

alinaqvi

Novice Member
A x-over is a board populated by various electrical components.

It sits in a speaker box and is attached to the speaker terminals.

It’s purpose, simply put, is to separate the signal the speakers receive from the amplifier into two (or more) separate signals.

In a stereo, two driver speaker the x-over will split the signal into two parts, one at above (very nominally) around 3000Hz to be fed to the tweeter.

The other, below the chosen frequency, will be sent to the mid/bass driver.

The x-over has other duties related to timing and phase change too.

An old one, in your case a very old one, will have virtually none of its original values intact.
Thanks, that's nicely explained. So is it worth me getting them checked and will it make any difference to the sound? I know you can't be definitive but just wanted a view. Also, the dust cap (that's what I meant) is very loose on one of the bass units. Should I do anything about this?
 

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