Viewing HD is still a problem for most

SoundBox

Novice Member
Despite my owning a rather archachic computer (upgrade on the near horizon)I am still able to load 720 or 1080 to YouTube in a short time due to a good broadband connection, however one of the driving forces behind me getting some HD gear was to make and upload high quality videos for friends and family to view. Over Christmas I made one 720 film and uploaded it, however upon visiting people and showing them the video on their computer I was disheartened to see that not in one case did the video play smoothly. The 1080 test footage I uploaded was just a stalled image in most cases. In the end I told them to use 480 to at least view what I had filmed.

Some of the computers were recent purchaces (a Toshiba laptop being from 2010) and seeing how bad the footage played was disapointing. I had to keep excusing it and saying that it was not my filming at fault. I don't think that people are upgrading their computers like they used to as they work well enough to view iPlayer and mess about online so why change?

Have you noted that friends and family are not set up to view your HD footage online? Is there any point in even uploading HD I wonder.
 

Chelters

Active Member
Probably more likely down to their bad broadband or youtube not dishing it out fast enough (server load at certain times of day). All "speed tests" I've undertaken show I'm close to the 10Mb download speed I pay for yet many sites/video are still slow to load. I've come to the conclusion there is no need for high speed broadband unless you have several computers connected to the net at the same time. I'd say 2-3Mb speed would be sufficient for a single computer.

Perhaps you should of put the vid on a disc an taken that around with you and see if it was really their PC that was the problem.
 

chrishull3

Well-known Member
Despite my owning a rather archachic computer (upgrade on the near horizon)I am still able to load 720 or 1080 to YouTube in a short time due to a good broadband connection, however one of the driving forces behind me getting some HD gear was to make and upload high quality videos for friends and family to view. Over Christmas I made one 720 film and uploaded it, however upon visiting people and showing them the video on their computer I was disheartened to see that not in one case did the video play smoothly. The 1080 test footage I uploaded was just a stalled image in most cases. In the end I told them to use 480 to at least view what I had filmed.

Some of the computers were recent purchaces (a Toshiba laptop being from 2010) and seeing how bad the footage played was disapointing. I had to keep excusing it and saying that it was not my filming at fault. I don't think that people are upgrading their computers like they used to as they work well enough to view iPlayer and mess about online so why change?

Have you noted that friends and family are not set up to view your HD footage online? Is there any point in even uploading HD I wonder.
well i make an HD file of films i wish to go online they can then be uploaded to you tube or vimeo,your problem seems to be friends and family dont have good broadband ,reasonable Broadband is wanted for viewing films but letting them buffer through first helps if broadband is rather slow,i dont know where pc laptops come in this its broadband speed.
 

SoundBox

Novice Member
Thanks for the thoughts. I did try making a disk but the video format was off in some way and no DVD player would accept it. I think it was recorded into the DVD as some form of data stream or computer code.

I did let it buffer but no good I am afraid. The best I got from 1080 on an IBM PC was one frame every 3 seconds. On the plus side at least YouTube allows HD to be viewed as SD without penalty so all clips were watched.
 

Bob++

Novice Member
I suggest that you record the footage onto an SDHC card (MP4 or AVI work well) and buy a cheap USB adaptor. You can plug that into any computer and, better still, any digital TV.

In my experience PCs dont play HD well at all - neither the PC nor the screen are up to it.
 

SoundBox

Novice Member
I suggest that you record the footage onto an SDHC card (MP4 or AVI work well) and buy a cheap USB adaptor. You can plug that into any computer and, better still, any digital TV.

In my experience PCs dont play HD well at all - neither the PC nor the screen are up to it.
Thanks for that - I did not consider that option. Yes, I found out the hard way that many PC's struggle with HD.
 

MarkE19

Moderator
Another bottleneck with streaming video is using WiFi to connect to the internet. Even with a very good, clean signal wireless G is not fast enough for real HD streaming, and wireless N although technically fast enough may not have a good enough signal to work at a good speed due to how crowded the few wireless channels are in most areas.

I stream full BluRay rips around my home over a wired network without any stuttering, even high bitrates of upto around 50mbps. I simply couldn't do this over a wireless link.

Mark.
 

doug_1986

Well-known Member
Youtube really should be fine... and on a few different computers in a row? Sure it's not that you uploaded a seriously high bitrate video or something? I know youtube re-encodes it, but still.

Should try some other 1080 content on their computers if you get the chance again.
 
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12harry

Well-known Member
Reading the thread I wonder if the original upload was at fault, being a new venture, etc.

However, during Public Holidays is not a good time to check out web content . . . . and faults are likely to suffer delay in fixing and all the extra-users must affect bandwidth.

Did OP note if other YouTube Stuff was also received in poor condition - this might show the playback is faulty, due to extra-users...etc.
However, if other content was OK, that points to OP's material......

Many Editors allow direct upload to YouTube (etc.) provided you have a valid account - that should remove any Quality/frame-rate issues . . . . . . . . . . . . (fat-chance, eh?)

Whilst a poor broadband speed will affect playback (so the Buffering suggestion may solve this), it should not affect UpLoads - it's just they take a little longer . . . . but check YouTube FAQ's if in doubt...
 
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axiomprime

Novice Member
My first couple of YouTube uploads didn't go well so I followed the steps in the trouble-shooting section, re-encoded my footage to a different file type and it was fine.
 

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