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VIDEO: Philips demo Dolby Vision and P5 Picture Processing on their OLED TVs at Dolby HQ

Coulson

Well-known Member
I went to this Philips event*** as an avowed LED HDR fanatic (with my favourite light cannon), but I have to say that OLED is really beginning to grow on me.

The picture quality of the new Philips OLED in SDR mode is what you would expect from OLED but the "Vivid" mode features they have does do the SDR to pseudo HDR conversion extremely well, and I mean extremely well. Again HDR and DV were what you expect but Philips use the 3rd Gen P5 in a novel way again creating a Dolby Vision Bright mode which includes all the advantages of Dolby Vision but with extra processing. We were at Dolby HQ with Dolby engineers so this tech does have their blessing.

What's impressive is that we were comparing the TV to "the" Dolby Pulsar 4000 nit broadcast monitor*. For one particular scene the new processing brought the Philps a little closer to the Pulsar than I think any other TV could reach. For another dark but very colourful scene it actually matched the Pulsar because of the inherent advantages of OLED over (probably) the best LED TV on the planet.

All in all this has been my most enjoyable event so far (even if as usual I didn't win anything).
Thank you AVForums (Cheers Phil). Thank you Philips (Danny was great as usual). Thank you Dolby HQ (I'm now the kid on the tricycle from the Incredibles :)).

*About the Dolby Pulsar, I understand what Vincent is talking about now. I never realised how limited many bright window shots are until I saw the Pulsar. Whereas on film, you get can get a bright window with light streaming through it, on the Pulsar you go an actual window, just like in real life where you can still see all the detail outside that window with natural light coming in. It was completely different. This is where all the tone mapping and processing in the world couldn't match the raw 4000 nit power of the Pulsar.

** Man, what I would give to watch some films in the Dolby Cinema at Dolby HQ. Easily and I suppose, obviously ,the best Dolby Cinema in the country. There's a film that I'm just not interested in seeing, maybe even if it was free. But I would pay to watch it at Dolby HQ.

*** I just watched the video and I actually don't look quite as bad as I normally do. The botox is obviously doing its job.
 
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The General

Standard Member
Philips (TP-Vision) makes bangers of televisions lately. Only their LCD line is behind without any FALD options. And please Philips if you see this ditch the silver bezels on your TV's. It's ugly when the TV screen is off. Use black metal bezels on your 2020 line-up and stop using that ugly shiny plastic bezels.
 

Rizvan

Well-known Member
** Man, what I would give to watch some films in the Dolby Cinema at Dolby HQ. Easily and I suppose, obviously ,the best Dolby Cinema in the country. There's a film that I'm just not interested in seeing, maybe even if it was free. But I would pay to watch it at Dolby HQ.
If you haven't already been, Dolby has 3 Dolby Cinema's in the UK located within Odeon LUXE Cinema's. You can go them at London, Leeds and Manchester.
It's amazingly good :D
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
If you haven't already been, Dolby has 3 Dolby Cinema's in the UK located within Odeon LUXE Cinema's. You can go them at London, Leeds and Manchester.
It's amazingly good :D
and Birmingham (4th to be added to UK). But they can't touch the private screening room at Dolby HQ ;)
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
If you haven't already been, Dolby has 3 Dolby Cinema's in the UK located within Odeon LUXE Cinema's. You can go them at London, Leeds and Manchester.
It's amazingly good :D
London is NOT amazingly good. I went twice just to make sure. It's really average at best. I hear great things about Manchester though. But Dolby HQ is the best for many obvious reasons if you think about it.
 

Rizvan

Well-known Member
and Birmingham (4th to be added to UK). But they can't touch the private screening room at Dolby HQ ;)
I guess that is to be expected...... I have the Samsung HW-N950 and LG C8 65" and enjoying Dolby Vision and Atmos very much..... really impressed by the technology behind it.
I even had some Dolby sign's made and went with the blue LED Dolby Cinema theme ... :eek: lol

 

petekv32

Active Member
Agree about the London Dolby screen, any further than half way back and you need binoculars.
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
Agree about the London Dolby screen, any further than half way back and you need binoculars.
I'm not sure that the LSQ cinema is a good showcase for the Dolby brand.
 

jpr141

Well-known Member
Philips (TP-Vision) makes bangers of televisions lately. Only their LCD line is behind without any FALD options. And please Philips if you see this ditch the silver bezels on your TV's. It's ugly when the TV screen is off. Use black metal bezels on your 2020 line-up and stop using that ugly shiny plastic bezels.
Silver bezels? You mean OLEDs as well? Can't notice them in pics 'n vids.
 

888SNG

Standard Member
Yes Philips have the best image processing with Sony second.I went to the previous AV forum sponsored Philip's shoot out.Voted for it.

But since....

I think if you have seen good 4K on your TV your next investment must be an 8K set.I wouldn't buy another 4K.Little point to do so now unless it is your first like that Hisense cut price Oled.
I was very sceptical with 8K at first but when I realised how soft a 65 inch TV image looked at 7 feet,compared with a 55inch TV ;I still have had to sit 12 feet now to maintain the similar perceived sharpness of a 55 inch set.Moving the sofa back and forth was a ritialistic pain.That was when the penny dropped! More K like - 8K really matters.

With 8K at around 65 ppi or so I can sit at 6 ft and seeing the scene with no softness.Even my 11 year old niece could see that with no TV knowledge.Now you could be flippant and say a Samsung S10 mobile with 150ppi screen would be technically better then but it is a tad small for a cinematic experience.

At Harrods TV section with that new Samsung demo tiger jungle roaming scene we saw - for a split moment - 1 sec, my brain registered that as real.In cinematic experience parlance I was aroused as movies suppose to do to audiences.
HDR formats,colourists can add to that edge of the seat drama much so and with some scenes that added sharpness from 8K can takes you over the edge.Not always though.

(Update)I accept the post production house colourists would prefer to work on a 2k stock and upscale to 4k for the final cut and would not EVER consider an 8k source to work on but that say more about the cost benefits and output;it would double or triple the time and cost to work on 8K.

That is it for me with 8K.:)
My next TV set when prices come down to 4K prices now.Just as Oled has now plummeted the Hisense way.
I think It is the price and not the 8K format people have issues with just as when Oled TV came 6 years ago at that 4,000 quid price then.
 
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bongo123

Active Member
Yes Philips have the best image processing with Sony second.I went to the previous AV forum sponsored Philip's shoot out.Voted for it.

But since....

I think if you have seen good 4K on your TV your next investment must be an 8K set.I wouldn't buy another 4K.Little point to do so.
I was very sceptical with 8K at first but when I realised how soft a 65 inch TV image looked at 7 feet I had to sit 12 feet to maintain the perceived sharpness.Moving the sofa back and forth was a pain.That was when the penny dropped!

With 8K at around 65 ppi or so I can sit at 6 ft and think I am seeing the scene for real.Even my 11 year old niece could see that with no TV knowledge.

At Harrods TV section with that Samsung demo tiger jungle roaming scene we saw - for a split moment - 1 sec, my brain registered that as real.In cinematic experience parlance I was aroused as movies suppose to do to audience.HDR,colourist add to that edge of the seat drama much so and with some scenes that added sharpness takes you over the edge.

That was it for me with 8K.:)My next set.
Good luck with that, by the time you start seeing an actual roll out of 8K streaming/disc's the TV manufacturers will have moved on, theres only so much 8k demo reels and youtube vids one can watch, i had a look at the latest top of the range sammy 8k & 4k side by side and tbh i couldnt spot the difference unless i went up way close, imo 8k whilst i agree is a natural progression of the tech the leap from 4K to 8K simply isnt big enough to warrant a purchase, my next telly is going to be the LgC9 which will do me perfectly throughout the life of the upcoming PS5.
 

richardsim7

Distinguished Member
and Birmingham (4th to be added to UK). But they can't touch the private screening room at Dolby HQ ;)
Out of interest, what Dolby Cinemas have you been to other than that one in Vegas?
 

lgans316

Distinguished Member
Leaving all the marketing and technicalities aside, how are Philips TV division doing in general? Have they been posting profits or making losses?
 

curvature

Active Member
Philips (TP-Vision) makes bangers of televisions lately. Only their LCD line is behind without any FALD options. And please Philips if you see this ditch the silver bezels on your TV's. It's ugly when the TV screen is off. Use black metal bezels on your 2020 line-up and stop using that ugly shiny plastic bezels.
The silver bezel is the one of the reasons I didn't buy a Philips TV this time round. I so wanted the Ambilight feature but the TV's 'off' appearance put me off.
 

2ch Man

Active Member

dollag

Well-known Member
What clips were used for demos?
What was source?

some of philips demo material. samsungs demo material. life of pi. a few other bits in both 4k and 1080p. all generic really
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
What clips were used for demos?
What was source?
An important point to remember for events like this is that the clips will have been chosen to ensure the best outcome for Philips in this demonstration. They are not intended to provide an unbiased view of the display or satisfy everyone's interest in handling SD, HD and 4k, etc.

If a manufacturer ever has an event where their products do not look the best then something has gone seriously wrong in the set ups of the sets or in the choice of source material.

This was clearest to me in the comparison between the OLED and the Samsung QLED. For a start the Samsung was hampered by being in Dynamic mode - I have a Samsung TVs and Dynamic is awful. The first demo examples where the Samsung crushed blacks and blew out whites didn't really tell us anything about what the Samsung could do or how good the Philips was - other than to say that the Philips is better than Samsung in Dynamic mode. Then there were another set of demo clips - fireworks and a really dim movie scene just above black but with some bright highlights - that were chosen because they really are a torture test for LCD sets.

Don't get me wrong - I see nothing wrong with a manufacturer setting up a demo that is biased in their favour. I just feel that people should be more circumspect when talking about the results of the demo.
 

Mr THX

Active Member
An important point to remember for events like this is that the clips will have been chosen to ensure the best outcome for Philips in this demonstration. They are not intended to provide an unbiased view of the display or satisfy everyone's interest in handling SD, HD and 4k, etc.

If a manufacturer ever has an event where their products do not look the best then something has gone seriously wrong in the set ups of the sets or in the choice of source material.

This was clearest to me in the comparison between the OLED and the Samsung QLED. For a start the Samsung was hampered by being in Dynamic mode - I have a Samsung TVs and Dynamic is awful. The first demo examples where the Samsung crushed blacks and blew out whites didn't really tell us anything about what the Samsung could do or how good the Philips was - other than to say that the Philips is better than Samsung in Dynamic mode. Then there were another set of demo clips - fireworks and a really dim movie scene just above black but with some bright highlights - that were chosen because they really are a torture test for LCD sets.

Don't get me wrong - I see nothing wrong with a manufacturer setting up a demo that is biased in their favour. I just feel that people should be more circumspect when talking about the results of the demo.
Sorry I can’t make out from your post did you go to the demo?
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member

stevelup

Distinguished Member
Going back to the Dolby Cinema for a minute, I became fascinated with the projectors there and did lots of digging around.

The technology is very clever indeed.

The colour gamut is as a result of their being six different laser sources. Two different frequencies each of red, green and blue. In the Dolby London installation, all the lasers are in a separate room next door to the projection room, and linked to the projectors with fibre-optic cables. There is a whole rack full of lasers, and they are turned on and off in various combinations depending on the light levels needed at that instantaneous moment in time.

The black levels are due to there being six DMD assemblies in the projector. Three 4K ones and three 2K ones. Each combined laser light source then passes across the two DMDs in series.

So this is, effectively, a freakish kind of full array dimming with 2 million dimming zones per colour. Basically every four pixels has a dimming zone.

And, possibly, the most amazing thing is that Christie are willing to sell a version of this solution for home cinema use. Millionaires only need apply though as it's going to be mid six-figures!

This would make for a great AVForums article. Wonder if someone can get Christie on side?
 

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