Video Editing - New PC - Which one?

quinnyyy

Standard Member
I’m very much into editing videos I’ve recorded on different devices, however after buying Canon IXUS HS20 my Compaq 500B Microtower is struggling. Even though the footage isn’t exactly amazing quality, Sony Vegas is very much overwhelmed, it keeps crashing out and temporarily freezing.
Current PC info:
Windows 7 64bit
Pentium(R) Dual-Core CPU E5400 @ 2.70GHz, 2700 Mhz
RAM: 4GM (which is the most this PC will take)

I understand memory is my problem and with my PC being at the top of is RAM Allowance I need a new machine and I need some advice.
I’d like to just edit videos around an hour in length with my new Canon and my iPhone 5, however want to buy something that could be a bit future proof should I upgrade my camera.

Could you suggest both ends of the spectrum for me please, the budget option and the if money were no object option. I just cleared my credit card so it definitely time to put it to use!
 

doug_1986

Well-known Member
You really do need to set some kind of budget - a PC can basically cost as much as you want it to.

For my money, I think something like the following would suit;

"Titan 300i Fiato" Intel Core i5 3570k @ 4.40GHz Overclocked Ivybridge Quad Core Gaming PC [TitanFiato]

Assuming you already have a monitor/mouse/keyboard + the Windows 7 license you are currently using, for £742 that's a nice system. I would change the graphics card though to either the GTX660ti or the GTX670, as these are CUDA cards which you may find useful in the future (or if you decide to use any of the later Adobe products).

6gb RAM should be enough here, although RAM is cheap at the min, so fill yer boots if you like.


System Specification
- Case: Bitfenix Merc Alpha Midi Gaming Case (default choice, options available)
- Power Supply: Corsair GS 600w PSU
- CPU: Intel Core i5 3570K 3.40GHz @ 4.40GHz Ivybridge CPU
- Motherboard: Intel Z77 (Socket 1155) DDR3 Motherboard
- Cooler: Corsair H60 Water Cooler CPU Cooler
- RAM: 8GB DDR3 1600MHz Dual Channel Kit
- Primary Hard Drive: 1TB 7200RPM 64MB Cache Hard Drive (SSD/HDD Options Available)
- Secondary Hard Drive: SSD/HDD Options Available
- Graphics Card: GeForce 650Ti Boost 2048MB Graphics card (default choice, options available)
- Sound: Realtek 7.1 Channel Sound (On-Board)
- Optical Drive: OcUK 24x DVD+/-RW SATA Drive (default choice, options available)
- Wireless: Asus USB-N10 Micro USB Network Adapter Wireless-N 150Mbps
 

pilsburypie

Active Member
For video editing a huge amount of RAM is not needed. Neither is a graphics card. In fact many have problems with Vegas and GPU accelerated rendering and just leave it turned off.

What is important for video editing and rendering is CPU power.

The above machine looks good, but if it is too expensive I'd loose the graphics card (unless you game too)
 

doug_1986

Well-known Member
For video editing a huge amount of RAM is not needed. Neither is a graphics card.
Yes & No with this. The later 64-Bit versions of editing packages are making use of large amounts of RAM and powerful GPU's. Eg, CS5.5 onwards Adobe Premiere and After Effects will eat all the RAM you have - no matter how much, and putting a Cuda based Nvidia card in & enabling the Mercury Playback Engine is like flicking a supercharge switch!
 

12harry

Well-known Member
Yes I'm thinking that too, Vegas Pro and Movie-maker are all trying to get faster, as we demand more transitions, keyframing, etc. So having a (suitable) powerful graphics card is plain sense . . . indeed I wonder that OP shouldn't try out Software first, then wory about that Upgrade... at least then he can get the most suitable gear. I'm surprised his PC is crashing/freezing . . or is this during playback, perhaps? - where modest PC's will struggle, since they are having to render on the fly. It's rather odd he's using 64-bit on a MBO that allows only 4G - sounds like he's uprated the OS and not the hardware . . . maybe since XP-days....Oooer!

(((It would help if OP gives us the software title and version, so we don't have to second-guess..)))
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
I had exactly the same question as you. The video editor I wanted had a list of minimum requirements for a PC to run it. I took the list to my Dealer and he built a PC to match and exceed the requirements shown.
 

12harry

Well-known Member
Yep, but watch out that Sony's "Spec" should really read "Minimum spec" - what you need is to double the cores - and now we can benefit from help from the Graphics cards (but the precise models are far from clear, to me).

I spec'd my new PC by the Sony spec . . . and didn't plan to upgrade . . . now I wish I had.
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
I had exactly the same question as you. The video editor I wanted had a list of minimum requirements for a PC to run it. I took the list to my Dealer and he built a PC to match and exceed the requirements shown.
My dealer supplied me with a Zoostorm kitted out with all I needed. Remember Zoostorm supply a box and processor, you can up the spec to what is required from there.
 

PaulaRN

Standard Member
I'm very much into editing videos I've recorded on different devices, however after buying Canon IXUS HS20 my Compaq 500B Microtower is struggling. Even though the footage isn't exactly amazing quality, Sony Vegas is very much overwhelmed, it keeps crashing out and temporarily freezing.
Hi, I'm new to the world of video editing but I think I have a suggestion that might help. Have you ever heard of a Vegas feature called Smart Proxy? If you haven't, then you should check it out. I know this may sound dubious, but from what I've learned a person doesn't need a customized, high-end computer to run Vegas when they use Vegas' Smart Proxy. Give Vegas Smart Proxy a try. There's a lot of info around the Internet about Vegas Smart Proxy and there are some decent YouTube videos that shed light on it. If anyone disagrees with me then please post a response because I don't want to mislead anyone and I'd like to learn, too! :)
 
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Terfyn

Well-known Member
Smart Proxy is a method to produce files that are lower resolution working copies of video files. The process makes editing faster as it uses less computer power or memory but to render a video for DVD still requires all the power and memory as used in normal editing.
You can drive a Ferrari at 30 mph but you can't drive a Fiat 500 at 150 mph!!!!! (Sorry Fiat)
 

PaulaRN

Standard Member
Terfyn, I have a new laptop with the following specs:

Processor: i5-3317U CPU
RAM: 5.90 GB usable
OS: Windows 8

I just started learning how to edit videos. I acquired Vegas Pro through their free 30 day trial. I have a YouTube channel, but I have never uploaded a video. Right now I am learning how to do basic stuff like transitions, masking, key-framing, etc, etc. I have not shot any video and I have not rendered any video. With the specs I have, do you think my laptop will be good enough to edit videos once I start editing and rendering? Or do you think I'll run into the type of trouble that is bound to give me headaches?
 
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Terfyn

Well-known Member
I would hope not, you have enough mempry and a good processor. The trick is to see if your computer is better than the specification of minimum requirements for Vegas. When I updated my computer I took a copy of the minimum spec from the Pinnacle Studio site and asked my Dealer to give me a PC with a spec better than the list. So things like the graphics card and sound card were included.
I do not know Vagas but, as most editors require similar specs, it should be OK!!

If you like Vegas - stick with it but most of the suppliers go for a 30 day free trial. My choice of VideoStudio is also well supported with many tutorials. If you are interested have a look at Tutorials - Free tutorials
 

stormchaser

Novice Member
PaulaRN....................your pc will be fine in the most part for video editing , its only if you ever get after effects etc you will need a bit more ram etc.

it also sounds like you are very interested too as you have have previously mentioned masking etc which most beginners wouldnt know about or use.

look forward to seeing some of your vids on youtube
 

grahamlthompson

Distinguished Member
Smart Proxy is a method to produce files that are lower resolution working copies of video files. The process makes editing faster as it uses less computer power or memory but to render a video for DVD still requires all the power and memory as used in normal editing.
You can drive a Ferrari at 30 mph but you can't drive a Fiat 500 at 150 mph!!!!! (Sorry Fiat)
Missed the point, DVD authoring doesn't need a powerful computer. A tiny Atom powered netbook is powerful enough.

It's High Definition content that creates a problem. An underpowered PC doesn't have the grunt to preview edits like cross fades etc. Creating 720 x 576 proxies from 1920 x 1080 clips allows a very modest PC to preview edits on the fly and speeds up the editing no end. Only at the end when you have a complete movie do you substitute the HD content. The PC isn't required to generate previews in real time so you can simply leave the software to render the content. It will of course take a lot longer than a powerful computer but if you set it to render overnight for instance it doesn't really matter. The end result will be the same.
 

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