1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

VHS S (Information please)

Discussion in 'Digital TV & Video Players & Recorders' started by middlk, Jul 23, 2003.

Tags:
  1. middlk

    middlk
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2003
    Messages:
    17
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Can anyone help please.
    Can recordings made on a VHS S machine be played on a standard VHS video recorder. Also if ordinary tapes are used on a VHS S machine is the quality still higher ?
    I am thinking of buying a VHS S recorder (panasonic) has anyone got any advice for me.
     
  2. gmt steve

    gmt steve
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    648
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Manchester
    Ratings:
    +6
    No, you can't play SVHS recordings on a VHS machine unless it has Quasi SVHS playback. The quality of VHS recordings on a SVHS deck may be higher, but I doubt that you would notice. In fact I doubt that you would notice much difference on SVHS recordings if all you are taping is Broadcast TV. SVHS only really comes into it's own when recording higher bandwidth sources like DVD, Laserdisc, Digital camcorder. If you have a Digibox with an S-Video output then that offers a slight advantage too. Then again I have three VCRs, all of them SVHS, for the simple reason that at around £150 you can't go wrong really, just don't expect a huge difference with VHS. Oh and remember that SVHS tapes are more expensive and harder to find.
     
  3. bxd

    bxd
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2001
    Messages:
    1,482
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    Southampton
    Ratings:
    +136
    Hi,

    Just to add a little to what's been said :

    No .... you can't play s-vhs on an ordinary vhs machine (unless it has Quasi S-playback) but you can still switch a s-vhs machine to record in regular vhs if you have a need to.

    If the machine has the '-ET format', then you can use it to record s-vhs onto a regular tape. This will save you a bit of cash on tape costs and will give you a better quality recording than regular vhs... however, as far as I've heard, proper s-vhs tapes will be 'better' for quality recordings. (I've got 2 S-vhs machines and a D-vhs machine... none of them happen to have -ET onboard).


    brian.
     
  4. GaryB

    GaryB
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2002
    Messages:
    5,341
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    St Albans
    Ratings:
    +1,264
    Whilst most VHS VCRs won't play S-VHS recordings, a few very recent ones will. Some manufacturers now use the same chipset in all their models as it's cheaper to make large quantities of one chipset design than small quantities of several. They won't record S-VHS as it's not enabled and the heads can't record it anyway.
     
  5. NicolasB

    NicolasB
    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    5,804
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Emily's Shop
    Ratings:
    +520
    I would disagree with that assessment.
     
  6. gmt steve

    gmt steve
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    648
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Manchester
    Ratings:
    +6
    That is of course your prerogative, however since this is a forum
    (A medium of open discussion or voicing of ideas), perhaps you could elaborate?

    I would disagree with that assesment on the grounds that I have used the feature and it creates a much more grainy recording. It may have a better S/N figure or perhaps better frequency response, but subjectively, on a 36" CRT , it makes for a worse recording.
     
  7. NicolasB

    NicolasB
    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    5,804
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Emily's Shop
    Ratings:
    +520
    Well, it depends on a lot of things. But I've always thought that terrestrial analogue at its best is a much-maligned medium. A really good terrestrial analogue signal is not just superior to something like Sky Digital, it can even rival many DVD players (assuming you're talking about interlaced 4:3 material).

    And I find S-VHS to be quite a significant step up in quality from VHS when recording a good quality terrestrial analogue broadcast. The difference is less clear cut for digital satellite or cable.

    Granted I haven't used S-VHS much - I unwisely went straight to D-VHS which is much better again, but now a total white elephant - but I'd say it's superior to VHS on more or less any source, and on terrestrial analogue in particular.
     
  8. uk_jih

    uk_jih
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    175
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +6
    I have three s-VHS videos and I would not use a normal vhs any more. The best bits for me are the recordings from my s-VHS video camera and also the fact that on tv broadcasts it records the teletext as well. It is great to watch a film from 5 years ago and see the news / sport of the day as well.
     
  9. GaryB

    GaryB
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2002
    Messages:
    5,341
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    St Albans
    Ratings:
    +1,264
    The differences between VHS and S-VHS are clearly visible, even on normal broadcasts. Switching between S-VHS and normal VHS whilst making a recording shows the main advantage of S-VHS - the increased luminance bandwidth, which gives a sharper picture. Strangely, when S-VHS was developed, they didn't increase the chroma bandwidth so this is the same as VHS but the luma more than makes up for it. I have many programmes archived in S-VHS LP which is superior to VHS SP.
     
  10. gmt steve

    gmt steve
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    648
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Manchester
    Ratings:
    +6
    I agree completely, DVB and Sky are just tight with their bitrates, if not then DVB could be the equal or the better of analogue. But I think the difference when recording is that Terrestrial is a composite signal and of course DVB is component, so the S-VHS VCR has a better signal to work on from that medium.

    I'm glad that's the case for you, my opinion differs, but that's the sort of thing that middlk wants to hear, different opinions so he can hopefully make his own informed descison. I really do wish there was moe difference, but with the tapes I use, on the equipment I own, I can't honestly say that there is.

    Well the fact that recordings from an S-VHS camera are good quality is because that's what the thing was designed for. As for Teletext, I wasn't aware of this capability, I suspect that it's purely a feature of your particular model of VCR and would work in VHS mode also. Can anyone confirm this?
     
  11. Vic_B

    Vic_B
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I'm pretty sure that teletext recording is a feature of SVHS and so should work on all SVHS vcr's, and not on regular VHS vcr's. I have two different SVHS decks and they both record the teletext signal.

    Regarding analogue/digital picture comparisons, I'm lucky enough to have an excellent analogue reception, which I definitely prefer to digital. Flicking back and forth between an analogue and Freeview channel, the terrestrial analogue picture appears to have more depth, be a touch sharper. The digital picture can sometimes appear a little flat in comparison.

    I definitely notice the difference in quality when recording onto an SVHS tape. GMTV is good testing material. Nice, bright colours and potential for colour bleed on the clock and other osg. A regular VHS recording looks ok, but there is colour bleed on the clock and the overall picture is a tad muddy and dull when compared to the original broadcast. An SVHS recording gives significantly better results however. Colours are bright and punchy, colour bleed has disappeared and the overall picture is sharper. Looks virtually indistinguishable from the original broadcast in fact. Just a shame the tapes are so expensive.

    Best,
    Vic
     
  12. GaryB

    GaryB
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2002
    Messages:
    5,341
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    St Albans
    Ratings:
    +1,264
    It's not part of the specification, it's just a by product of the increased luminance bandwidth and does depend on the individual VCR - age, head condition, alignment, etc. I've seen variations in text recording capability even among individual samples of the same model. I once tweaked a couple of S-VHS VCRs to improve text recording capability for a local deaf support organisation so they could record and play programmes with subtitles.

    You might get the odd bit of text recorded on a standard VHS VCR (mainly the header due to the extra error correction it contains) but it won't be of any real use.
     

Share This Page

Loading...