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vcd/ svcd

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by jimmyboy, Aug 11, 2003.

  1. jimmyboy

    jimmyboy
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    what is the comparison between the quality of vcd/svcd and avi/divx files?
    The reason I ask is that it is cheaper to buy CDR than dvd-r and I tend to store movies on my PC HDD in avi- I can then transfer to DVD or vcd/svcd to playback on a dvd player or use my tv out from laptop to playback direct avi files (but no rgb output or s vhs). I am tempted to buy an xbox to modify as a dvd/avi/vcd player but wondered about the playback resolution/quality of the different formats.
     
  2. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    The video files formats, such as AVI and DIVX, can offer a wide degree of quality versus disk space settings. Obviously with MPG files for VCD and MPEG2 files for SVCD there are fixed settings to ensure compliance with the standard. You can find the specifications for VCD/SVCD here:
    http://www.disctronics.co.uk/technology/cd-rom/videocd.htm

    Connecting your PC to the TV would mean you would not have to worry about compliance with the file structure (meaning you could use greater or lesser compression as you see fit) but a VCD or SVCD (can your player handle these) is obviously convienant.

    All that said unless you archive stuff in MPEG 2 format (which takes up space) your going to loose quality. You can't for example compress everything using DivX and then later convert back to MPEG 2 without loss of quality. Whether that reduction in quality is acceptable is something only you can judge.

    Maybe you should download an application like TMPG Encoder and experiment with a variety of file formats. See if you think the quality is acceptable. You can find many suitable applications from here:
    http://www.dvdr-digest.com/

    If I may be rather blunt here and give you my opinion - IMHO you best off just bighting the bullet and getting a DVD burner. They aren't that expensive (under £200) and you will get a better end product rather than compressing stuff. A Programme like TMPG encoder can convert virtually any video file to MPEG 2 so will play back in most DVD players. Still if your only use is for things like downloaded movies that you want to watch and junk then maybe the CD-R idea is sound - but do note the quality may be an issue.
     

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