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UV light from PJ's??

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by HappyLad, Oct 24, 2003.

  1. HappyLad

    HappyLad
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    I Received my Panasonic AE300 back from repair today :)
    There was a problem with the lamp :(

    I Put the PJ back on the mount and fired up to make sure all was well.
    Anyhow, my son had left the pull cord piece from one of his Bayblade toys on the mantelpiece and I noticed it was fluorescing.
    The effect was similar to the type of thing you see under UV lamps.
    Do projector lamps produce UV and if so should I be worried about the effect on my eyes??
    :confused:
     
  2. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    I would think only if you look directly at the lamp. I doubt it's any more dangerous than looking at a ladies white underwear when they fired up the uv lights at the night club. ;)

    Gary.
     
  3. inzaman

    inzaman
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    And it is far less fun :D
     
  4. HappyLad

    HappyLad
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    Seriously though, this is the type of thing I'm concerned about:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2724277.stm

    If the PJ is kicking out a lot of UV then I believe that this will be scattered back from the screen in the same way as visible light is that is viewed as the picture.
     
  5. calscot

    calscot
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    What about using an Fl-D filter? It also gives better blacks and improves the colour balance.

    I'm sure it'll filter out uv.

    I've got one and got so used to it, I wondered if I really needed it. I took it off for a few days but ended up putting it back on as the picture was brighter but appeared more washed out. The color lacked vibrance without the filter too.

    Cheers,
    Cal.
     
  6. Chris Frost

    Chris Frost
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    Projector lamps do generate UV as well as visible light, but there are UV filters in place next to the lamp to reduce the effects to safe levels. The light leaving the lens is safe.

    Regards
     
  7. buns

    buns
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    what are the lamps? Like sodium/mercury (i know they arent those 2, was just giving example!)????

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  8. Chris Frost

    Chris Frost
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    Buns, you're actually pretty close when you said Mercury. Most of the industry is now using the UHP lamp technology invented by Philips.

    UHP is a Philips trade marked term. It stands for Ultra High Pressure (sometimes called Ultra High Performance). These use an arc in a pure mercury vapor under high pressure - typically 200x atmospheric pressure. The arc gap is much smaller that metal halide lamps. It's about 1.0 mm across, creating a much smaller light source. This results in much greater lighting efficiency; a 100 watt UHP lamp in a projector can deliver more light to the screen than a 250 watt metal halide lamp.

    When driven correctly UHP lamps have another significant advantage; the lamp maintains almost all of its initial brightness up until the day it fails.

    Regards
     
  9. buns

    buns
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    oh i assumed it wouldnt be mercury cos i know of a few UV lines present with it! But as you say, UV filters are fairly effective so it shouldnt be much to worry about

    If anyone is interested, check out nist.gov for the relative line intensities.

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  10. HappyLad

    HappyLad
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    The Panasonic uses a 120W UHM lamp (metal halide?).
    I guess they didn't want to pay Philips for the UHP technology
    :(
     

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