Using THX tune-up app to calibrate OLED

Discussion in 'LG TVs Forum' started by ppearson1975, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. ppearson1975

    ppearson1975
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    Having bought an oled55b7v last week, I'm now trying to get it set up correctly. I spent my budget on the TV itself so I'm not going to be paying a professional calibrator to set it up for me unfortunately!

    I found the Android app THX tune-up, which I'm running on my phone and using its chromecast feature to display the test patterns on the TV. It helps tune some fairly basic settings, but I'm mainly interested in ensuring that I'm not losing dark or bright detail, and getting colours such as skin tones as accurate as possible, which is what the app seems to help with.

    I have a couple of questions regarding this. They apply to any similar tuning method and to any TV really, but here seemed as good a place as any to post this.

    1) Since I'm using the chromecast, the changes I make apply to that particular input, and not to, for example, live TV or onboard apps such as YouTube or Netflix. Given this, is there any value in tuning using this method, and then simply applying the exact same settings to these other inputs, or is it really only useful for tuning the chromecast input itself? Say I plug in a different device to the HDMI socket I've just tuned, will the settings be good for that device too?

    2) The "colour" and "tint" tuning rely on using my phone camera with a red filter applied, and then changing the setting until the pattern on screen matches the colour of the red background. Does this process assume that my phone is displaying colours correctly? Thinking about it now, I guess not because if the two colours are out by the same amount they would still match. Can anyone confirm?

    3) The description in the app for the "tint" setting suggests that most TVs have tint roughly correct out of the box, so it may not need to be changed. Also, all recommended settings for this TV that I've seen say tint should be left at 0. However I found that the colours matched most precisely when I set tint to Green 11. Has anyone else found that tint needed adjusting for them?

    Thanks for all your help on this.
     
  2. youngsyp

    youngsyp
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    To be honest, you're wasting your time for reasons that you've mentioned in your post. I.e. the camera isn't accurate and you're only making changes to the Chromecast input.

    You can set the Brightness, Contrast and Sharpness controls by eye, using freely available test patterns. SDR gamma is largely subjective, so set that to preference. I like around 2.4 (coarse setting) as it gives a nice pop to the picture, for example. OLED Light is largely set for the environment you're watching the display in.
    The rest of the basic controls should be set to default and Colour Temperature set to Warm 2 to give the most accurate picture possible, without manipulation of the controls that need a meter to read the changes made. This should all be fine under one of the ISF Expert presets.
    You should also set Colourspace, or whatever it's called, to 'Auto' on the 2017 OLEDs from memory.

    Paul
     
  3. ppearson1975

    ppearson1975
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    Many thanks for your reply. Since each input needs configuring separately, how would I display test patterns within, say, live TV? I'm presuming this isn't possible and I have to live with whatever looks best for such inputs.
     
  4. youngsyp

    youngsyp
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    It is possible but not without getting creative.
    Your best bet is to use a Blu-ray player that you can adjust the output video configuration on. For example, if you play a test pattern disc through the Blu-ray player and have it output 1080p50, assuming the Blu-ray player is 'transparent', what is displayed on your TV we'll be representative of a typical, digital 1080p50 source.
    This is what a Pro calibrator would tend to do but substitute the Blu-ray player for a dedicated test pattern generator.

    Of course you still need to measure the test patterns, displayed, some how.

    Paul
     

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