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Using Freeview HD With Virgin

MartynVRS

Standard Member
I take it's not possible? I'm looking at a Sony TV for my parents that has Freeview HD built in and I'd like to use it since they don't have a Virgin HD box. They can't justify the cost for only a few HD channels and the main ones they watch will be on Freeview HD.
 

sapper696

Active Member
But if you connect to a TV rooftop ariel it will work. I presume they had one, before virgin.
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
If your parents have a suitable external aerial and they live in an area in which Freeview HD can be received they shouldn't have a problem.
If the aerial is fed via a splitter through the VM box they should be able to receive the HD channels.
 

mike7

Distinguished Member
There is really no need to connect the aerial to the Virgin Box. Plug it directly into the aerial socket on the TV. I'm assuming that that TV is connected to the virgin box via a SCART lead.
 

MartynVRS

Standard Member
The box wasn't originally. There was a coax cable going from the box to the TV. I've connected it up now with scart and it's working fine. Problem solved now I just need to know what I need to split the aerial connection. Currently the aerial is being used on my TV upstairs.
 

mike7

Distinguished Member
Make sure the Virgin box is set for RGB as this gives a better picture with most SCART connections.

Simple 'splitters' can be found at B&Q and Maplin for a couple of Pounds or so. Bear in mind that, generally speaking, splitting causes the signal strength to drop by a half. Freeview HD is being transmitted at a low level in some parts of the Country until Switchoff is complete. This will almost certainly give an unreliable reception of HD. You can try this route, but if it fails then you will need an amplifier with two outputs mounted as close as possible to the aerial itself. ie: in the attic. Again these devices are obtainable from the High st shops I've mentioned.
 

Boostrail

Distinguished Member
A good aerial amplifier for a low price is the "Lowry" brand one sold in Morrisons. Its actually an SLX with variable gain and is half the price (£8 last time I was in Morrisons) that it is sold elsewhere.
 

Colin London

Well-known Member
Simple 'splitters' can be found at B&Q and Maplin for a couple of Pounds or so. Bear in mind that, generally speaking, splitting causes the signal strength to drop by a half. Freeview HD is being transmitted at a low level in some parts of the Country until Switchoff is complete. This will almost certainly give an unreliable reception of HD.

Ummm - quite a generalisation there! My aerial installation has a simple passive split up the mast to feed two outlets (one upstairs, one downstairs), and I am using a 'low power' temporary HD transmitter (CP) at 20 miles without a direct line of sight.

I certainly DO NOT have unreliable reception of HD, despite the co-channel from Sandy :rolleyes:
 

lbear

Well-known Member
The aerial input has no function with the Virgin cable box apart from being "passed through" if you use the RF output from the box. Now you have the Virgin box linked using SCART, the aerial input is redundant. The separate cable connection provides the signal for the box to decode.

Just attach the aerial lead directly to the TV. Providing they are in a Freeview HD service area and they have a decent aerial, you should have no problems. Also, you will not need to purchase either a splitter or an amplifier - unless they are served by a low power HD mux prior to DSO. In that case, you may need an amplifier as a temporary measure if the signal is not strong enough.

Use this link Digital UK - Home and fill in their house number and postcode on the checker. Also tick the "aerial installer" box. This expanded output will give you an idea of the point in DSO they are at together with an indication of the signal strengths of the various muxes. You may also see if there are any planned changes of frequency during the latter stages of the process.
 

mike7

Distinguished Member
Ummm - quite a generalisation there! My aerial installation has a simple passive split up the mast to feed two outlets (one upstairs, one downstairs), and I am using a 'low power' temporary HD transmitter (CP) at 20 miles without a direct line of sight.

I certainly DO NOT have unreliable reception of HD, despite the co-channel from Sandy :rolleyes:

Obviously this situation is good for you, but not in many other parts of the country. Bit ridiculous to say that because you have a good signal, so will everyone else ! I'm assuming you don't live next door to MartynVRS.
 

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