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Using Cd Player

Senna 94

Standard Member
Hi all

Is there any benefit to hooking up a cd player to my rx v1900 amp or is the blu-ray player good enough for playing CD music running the amp with kef 3005se thanks
 

scorpion88

Established Member
I would say a dedicated CD Player would sound better. However, worth spinning a few CD's through your BD Player (assuming you already have one) and see if your satisfied with the sound. I dont have a BD but have read that some models are actually quite good with music.

IMO again from what I have read your Yamaha is better than most AV amps for music.

Hope that helps.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Get a Playstation. One of the original ones. Probably one of the best CD players ever made, just a pity they didn't put a digital audio out on them.
 

Senna 94

Standard Member
Thanks for the info

I have a cd player from a unused set up thought i could use that and maybe hook up the old Kef floorstanding speakers i have from 1990 and move the 3005se fronts to turn it into a 7.1 system all being kef should work i guess.
 

russyj

Established Member
Get a Playstation. One of the original ones. Probably one of the best CD players ever made, just a pity they didn't put a digital audio out on them.

Is this serious? What made them so good?

Might look into getting hold of one of these if this is true... and was the onboard DAC not particularily good? Surely with a bit of cracking-open-and-fiddling you could intercept the connection between the digital and DAC and re-route that to an amp?

Cheers, Russ
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Is this serious? What made them so good?

Might look into getting hold of one of these if this is true... and was the onboard DAC not particularily good? Surely with a bit of cracking-open-and-fiddling you could intercept the connection between the digital and DAC and re-route that to an amp?

Cheers, Russ



Sort of, but I don't think I'd really advise you get one ;)

Is there an original Sony PlayStation game console still in use in your home? Or do you have your PS1 buried at the bottom of a closet?

It turns out your video game console may be worth a lot more than you think. You might actually own one of the best sounding, high-fidelity CD players out there.

Audiophiles have been abuzz about PlayStation 1 audio for some time now. There has been a lot of experimenting with these game consoles with some very interesting results.

One of my guides in this journey has been Michael Lavorgna — an audio guru who writes for 6moons.com. Michael has been listening to his PlayStation for a while now and helped me find the best-sounding machines.

Sony’s first PlayStation was released in the United States in September, 1995. It had a custom MIPS R3000 processor and it used CD-ROMs for playing games. Sony sold more than 100 million units. That means there are a lot of used ones out there.

There were a number of different PlayStation models made over the PlayStation 1's five-year life span. Michael told me to look for a

PlayStation with the model number SCPH-1001, which is the unit with separate audio and video RCA output jacks. That particular model allows audiophiles to use their own (expensive) audio cables to get “perfect” sound.

I also tried one of the other PlayStation consoles that didn’t have separate RCA output jacks. Other models had a single output cord with audio and video jacks at the end. I found one in good condition on eBay.

Before I started my listening tests, Michael had a warning for me: "Plug in the units — turn ‘em on — and don’t turn them off." It seems the PlayStations sound best when left on all the time. Michael was right. You shouldn’t even listen for the first three days. Both units need every second of the break-in period.

Overall, both of these PlayStation game consoles make really terrific CD component decks. Compared to a Pioneer DVD/CD/SACD player, the Sonys sounded clearer and cleaner. They also held their own against my top-of-the-line, Class A+ rated Sony SACD machine.

But in the end, the more expensive player was just plain better. As for the PlayStations, I preferred, slightly, the sound of my 009 model to the 1001 — but the differences were few.

I preferred the 1001’s original Sony game controller to the bright red “aftermarket” controller which came with the 009. PlayStation controllers are wired units. They are not as flexible as more modern wireless remote controls units which come with most devices. Plus, since the controllers weren’t designed for home audio use, you’re on your own to figure out what to press to get your music to play.

If you already own a PlayStation you should dust it off and give it a listen. And, if you want to buy one you should be able to find a console good shape for $25 or less on eBay. My 009 cost me all of $20 — including shipping. And, there were a bunch of neat video games thrown in as well.

A second life for first PlayStation - Tech and gadgets- msnbc.com
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Why not? For 40 quid including a wireless controller, surely its worth a punt? :cool:

It's up to you, but they don't particularly sit well with other audio components on a rack because of the pop up lid and you've no display unless you utilise the video out and have it hook up to a TV. If you can live with the foibles, go for it ;)
 

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