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Using an industrial PC to drive a Plasma

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs' started by ehinz, Dec 2, 2004.

  1. ehinz

    ehinz
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    I would like to check if anyone had tried connecting a normal industrial grade PC to the VGA ports on a Plasma?

    With some brand/ make of the PC, I am unable to get it to allow my PDP to display at a resolution of 852 x 480 while with other brands/ makes, I cannot get an entire screen resolution of 842 x 480.

    These PCs have been loaded with Windows 2000 and just like in normal PC monitor, I was experimenting in sending the VGA output from the CPU to the Plasma screen.

    Any advice on this issue for those who had such experiences or experiments before? =)
     
  2. Stuart Wright

    Stuart Wright
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    What is 'an industrial grade PC'?
    And what is a PDP?
     
  3. stevelup

    stevelup
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    Hi

    Industrial PC's are generally in metal boxes much smaller than normal PC's. They tend not to have any external drives and are used for embedded applications.

    PDP is Plasma Display Panel!

    To answer the original posters question, not all VGA chipsets can do 16:9 resolutions such as 852x480. This is especially true of the embedded chipsets. Have you tried using powerstrip? That can often create working 16:9 resolutions on chipsets which don't claim native support for those resolutions.

    Steve
     
  4. jasonl

    jasonl
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    just to add

    Powerstrip also has limitations, i believe not all video cards are supported by PS

    while most AGP and PCI/e cards are supported by PS, might not be the case with VGA chipsets (esp the older ones)

    hth
     
  5. ehinz

    ehinz
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    Will I be able to get a 1:1 direct mapping of pixels if I were to hook up the Plasma to a normal PC via its VGA port instead?

    Anyone had encountered such experiences whereby in one instance of the PC you may get a "windscreen" effect on the plasma while on the other instance (using another make/ model of PC) you may have obtained jagged screen on the display when MS Windows starts booting up?

    Please advise. :)
     
  6. Koing

    Koing
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    There is no such thing as an 'industrial grade pc'.

    MOST pc's will be in a 'metal box' as such. The size is not relevant. It just means the motherboard on the pc is 'smaller'. MOST PC's do not have any external drives also. Most are internal unless it is a hot swapable IDE or SCSI drive. You could have external HD in firewire or usb2 enclosures BUT you can buy them for ANY pc regardless.

    The embedded application is not really true.

    Most PC's do 'everything'. If he is thinking of the ones for others tasks they are most likely 'workstations' or 'severs'.

    What graphics card and drivers have you got running on your pc's?

    On my PC and graphics card (Nvidia) and drivers I have access to 848x480. HOW did you get to 842x480?!

    Koing
     
  7. ehinz

    ehinz
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    The emphasis is not on whether if the PC is an industrial-grade or not.

    Say supposed we run on a normal PC today, are all motherboards' VGA chipsets able to do 16:9 resolutions such as 852x480 as was also noted by Steve? Some motherboards come with VGA chipsets that claim can do 16:9 resolutions.

    However, I noted that even for some motherboards that come even with de-interlacer, MPEG-2 hardware decoder, I noted the CPU resources were extremely high when running a MPEG-2 video file on the Plasma Display Panel, given that the background is not running any applications.

    On some motherboards, I noted the frequency was not auto-scanned hence the need to self-configure the scans on the PC.

    Any such experiences to share? =)
     
  8. stevelup

    stevelup
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    Koing,

    I don't agree with what you say.

    Most people would define an industrial PC to be a small form factor PC designed to be embedded in - or on - another piece of equipment.

    The original poster is clearly looking for an extremely small form factor machine which can be bolted to a plasma bracket or suchlike. I think his definition of "Industrial PC" is completely valid as was my expansion for the second poster.

    I believe you are being deliberately obtuse for no apparent reason?

    Steve
     
  9. stevelup

    stevelup
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    ehinz,

    What exactly are you trying to achieve.

    Do you need a specific form factor for the machine?

    The VIA EPIA boards are more than capable of decoding MPEG2 video + Audio without using excessive CPU load. You can get fanless ones and ones which will run off a single 12V power supply.

    I recommend you take a look at www.linitx.com - they specialise in small form factor.

    If you don't need a small form factor machine, just use anything with an nVidia or ATI video chipset as they are both definitely capable of the resolutions you require.

    Steve
     
  10. Koing

    Koing
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    A shuttle pc or any smaller sized pc in a box etc is not an 'industrial pc'.

    The original poster wanted experiences or experiments done so. I gave what I found out with my setup.

    The original poster has use or used serveral pc's to connect to a plasma screen and has gotten varying results.

    From your example it would just be a HTPC in a small form factor like a shuttle or one of those Hi Fi standard cases that you can buy from many manufactures.

    I'm being accurate with terminology here.

    Koing
     
  11. stevelup

    stevelup
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    I never said anything at all about Shuttle PC's.

    I am referring to extremely small form factor machines. About the size of a book. You wouldn't bolt a shuttle PC to a plasma bracket would you?

    What is your definition of an industrial PC then? You say your terminology is correct, but don't actually state what you consider an industrial PC to be...

    This whole argument is irrelevant anyway...

    We both agree that most - but not all - chipsets can offer WVGA resolution. Sometimes with hacks, sometimes without.

    That is all the original poster asked. The whole thread about what does - or does not - constitute an industrial PC arose from Stuart asking what an "Industral PC" was.
     
  12. Koing

    Koing
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    I know you didn't say anything about Shuttle PC's. But they are a small form factor pc also and you have others ones. These imo do not constitute an 'industrial pc'.

    I said that I am being accurate with terminology here and a small form factor pc does not consitute an 'industrial pc'. One that has an embedded application does not make it an industrial pc also.

    An industrial pc would be one that would be better built as most things in industry are better built and have better back up features like if the psu died you could swap it out easily or it would have 2 in. But in all honesty an industrial pc doesn't really exisit now a days. You can build any pc with whatever you want.

    It isn't like you have a 'commericial' cooker and a 'industrial cooker' which is much more 'robust', quicker and easier to use. With PC's you can pretty much do anything you want with it with parts etc.

    I just think an industrial pc doesn't exisit unless you class a rack mount server one. That would probably be the closest thing to an industrial pc. But again it is still only a pc.

    Yes the whole arguement is not relevant. We are just talking semantics.

    Koing
     
  13. nealgs

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    we use industrial pcs here at work - they consist of the usual case but made from much thicker material and generally weight a lot more than normal. They then consist of a backplane (http://www.icpamerica.com/ip_7s.php) which contains various ISA/PCI/Processor board slots.

    Into the processor slots you plug a single card computer (i.e. a PCI type card containing processor/memory/NIC/Gfx/Serial/USB slots etc (http://www.icpamerica.com/JUKI_EDEN.php)

    Graphics in these are Nvidia/ATi/Savage based chipsets

    Into the PCI slots you plug in any PCI related card (as for ISA slots also). Most have multiple Processor slots for 2 or more Single card computers boards.

    They are used in automation processes mostly, but my last place also used them as just normal PCs.

    gary
     

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