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Using a Bluetooth Headset

Discussion in 'Mobile Phones Forum' started by Paul.Bill, Apr 22, 2004.

  1. Paul.Bill

    Paul.Bill
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    Hi all, I'm thinking of getting a Nokia 6310i and, solely for use in the car, a Jabra BT250. Can anyone help with four very basic questions on the use of bluetooth headsets:

    1) Can you simply turn on the Jabra or is it also necessary to fiddle through the menus on the phone to get it to connect to the headset? I'm intending leaving the Jabra in the car and it would be nice if I could just leave the phone in my pocket and simply turn the Jabra on when getting into the car.

    2) If the phone rings when you've forgot to turn the Jabra on, is it possible to turn it on to answer the call or do you need to use the phone? If it is possible to answer the call without touching the phone, does the Jabra turn on and connect with the phone quickly enough to avoid the call being routed to voicemail?

    3) If the Jabra is left on, does it automatically reconnect after the phone has gone out of range?

    4) I understand that using bluetooth drains the phone battery much more quickly. Does this only apply when you're actually on a call, or when the Jabra is within range or it it all the time bluetooth is activated on the phone? One of the reasons I like the Nokia 6310i is the long standby and talk time and it would be a major disappointment if the bluetooth headset destroyed this advantage.

    Many thanks
     
  2. alfablue

    alfablue
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    Hi I have the Jabra BT 200 - may be similar.

    Once the Jabra is linked to your phone (once only task), then the phone will "see" it when on and in range.

    This is good, but occasionally the phone rings at home, i go to answer and the headset is engaged (cos it's on in my bag, perhaps).

    The other thing is, battery life is fairly short, so leaving in the car doesn't really work, unless there is an incar charger for it. Chances are, if you leave it there, the time you need it, it will be flat.

    I don't think the phone battery life is much of an issue, much more a problem with the headset
     
  3. Paul.Bill

    Paul.Bill
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    Many thanks for that Alfablue.

    When I leave the car for any length of time I'd intend to turn the Jabra off to conserve the battery. However, if I forget to turn it on when I get back to the car and the phone rings, can you simply turn the Jabra on to answer the call? If so, does the Jabra turn on and connect with the phone quickly enough to stop the call being diverted to voicemail?
     
  4. alfablue

    alfablue
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    Hi Paul

    The Jabra 200 turns on with about a 3 second press on the button, after that the phone will connect probably within the second (but this may vary on different phones, I am using a Sony T620). If worried you could extend the rings before your phone diverts.

    I can't speak for the BT250, it may all be different, and certainly as I got my BT200 for £30, I think its limitations are fine for the price, but I have considered spending maybe £100 on a dedicated Sony bluetooth.

    The battery life is such that if I use it on a calls of 20 minutes total in a day, I feel like I want to recharge it, as even whilst off the charge diminishes, and it's a real b*mmer when the thing is dead just when you need it.

    Whilst it solves one problem (me chopping the handsfree wires in the door!), it gives me a new problem, two things to charge up.

    I cant say if other / pricier models are better, or if there would be the same issues.

    I suppose the best answer is to just get an in-car charger. Having thought about it, maybe thats how my money is best spent, as the Jabra isn't at all bad providing its charged.

    I hope this helps
     
  5. Paul.Bill

    Paul.Bill
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    Hi Richard

    Amazon have the Jabra 250 for £49.99 and the quoted talk and standby times are 8 and 250 hours as compared with 3 and 96 hours for the Jabra 200. This might be a suitable solution for you, alternatively car chargers for the Jabra 200 and 250 are available for £10 or £17 with a holder.

    I've just found yet another alternative, in Q3 2004 Jabra are introducing 3 new headsets: http://excoboard.com/exco/thread.php?forumid=18761&threadid=63251 I think I may wait for these to become available.

    One final question, if the phone is actually ringing when the Jabra is switched off, can you switch it on and answer the call on the Jabra?
     
  6. alfablue

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    Hi Paul

    Sorry for the late reply.

    The charger is probably the answer for me (your questions seem to have helped me more than you - thanks!!!)

    One (or maybe more) of the new Jabra sets uses a AAA battery. This would be quite good as one could use 800mah NIMH batteries, and always have a spare duracell in the car.

    I think the new battery life specs (beyond the 200) might make all the difference, though with an in-car charger I think I will be happy, then I never need to bring it indoors and then forget to take it back to the car, and should never be without charge.

    As for your last question, I thought it was "yes", but in reality, one sometimes has to prompt the phone to find the Jabra and calls will be missed. On the other hand, unless the Jabra has been turned off, the phone always finds it when in range.

    The connectivity is likely to be different (and maybe better) with different phones, and I reckon Nokia's are the best and maybe they connect more reliably.

    In practice, whether you have to prompt the phone or not, it is not dissimilar from remembering to plug in one's wired headset before a journey. If you forget its a fumble when the phone rings and calls are lost just the same, so its really just learning and remembering different routines.
     
  7. monkeynuts

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    i have a 6310i and a Bt200 which work fine together, but i have to admit i soon got fed up of having to use a headset in the car due to charging connecting etc and its a pain if you want to listen to the radio as they act as an ear plug and block sound to one ear.

    I have since bought a wired in car kit which was dead easy to fit (3 wires in total crimped into the stereos leads in my case) it is superb in comparison to the headset. it has its own speaker which is loud and clear and doesn't interfer with microphone in anyway. (wired into the radio solutions are even better but cost more)

    I initially thought the wired solution would be the expensive route but i picked up a Nokia car kit (nk91 i think) for the 6310i (and similar phones) for £25 second hand (tho it was unused).

    Hope this is of some use.

    Sam
     
  8. alfablue

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    Sam - where is the microphone sitiated?

    I have always been a little put off by the wired solution because of little space for a holder / not wanting to drill the dash.

    My "holder" is actually a discrete square of velcro which hardly shows, but it is yet to be tested whether this can be treated as a holder in legal terms, if I was ever stopped by the police....

    But I guess with a wired solution the quality and useablity will be significantly better
     
  9. monkeynuts

    monkeynuts
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    Even though I have an old car i didn't want to drill holes in the dash. So i bought a special mounting kit that consists of an thin angled bracket that can be securely slotted between a join in the dash somewhere and then you screw the mounting to this instead. my holder is situated on the right of the steering wheel as it seemed the most logical location for my car.

    They make these specifically for each car and although fiddly to fit, are well worth the few quid that they cost.

    The microphone wire runs behind the plastic strip that hides the support between door and windscreen pillar and just pokes out the top(can be velcroed or stuck to whatever is there.

    The speaker is in an unusual position as its behind the gearstick under the handbrake (not in the way as its not very big but sufficiently loud).

    All the wires feed into a control box which i have simply taped into a big cubby hole that i have under the steering wheel (prob taken up/covered up in newer cars).

    I have managed to hide all the wires and am dead chuffed for 25 quid!

    Bear in mind that if you get a wired in solution i think some places fit for free (tho obviously costing more in first place) and that many systems come with an arial lead which will boost signal significantly and sometimes come in the form of a tax disc holder (hence discrete) etc...
     
  10. alfablue

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    Sam - this sounds really good - thanks!
     
  11. Paul.Bill

    Paul.Bill
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    Having tried a Jabra BT250 and found it too difficult to put in with one hand while driving, I’ve been doing some more research and have found three interesting alternatives:

    Jabra and Motorola have recently announced wireless speaker phones. The Motorola HF800 looks small enough to clip on the sun visor or mirror. Has anyone got one of these yet? The Jabra SP100 is bigger and more expensive, but it looks like the speaker quality would be much better.

    The Hutchinson iTech Bluetooth clip. In a separate topic I asked if anyone had used one of these. Phones4U are selling them for £40. It’s a simple earphone, Bluetooth headset.
     

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