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USB wall charger that works with everything?

kLy

Standard Member
Hi all!

I've come up against a wall here. Increasingly more and more stuff charges only via USB but I really don't want to have to use my computer each time I want to charge something.

What I'd like to charge:
- Sony reader PRS 350
- PSP 1000
- PS3 controller
- XBox 360 controller

I've tried my iPhone+iPad wall charger as well as a generic OEM AC to USB charger bought at a local electronics store and none of them work :(

Can anyone point me to some information on any of this? Apparently some devices require some pins to be connected in the USB? Whatever the case all these things work when plugged into a computer but wall chargers seem to be problematic.

I'm having a look on uk eBay (eg.*Universal Power Travel USB Charger Adapter Plug AC Wide on eBay (end time 12-Dec-10 15:36:21 GMT))
as well as a local Norwegian online store:*Belkin Single USB AC Charger - Strømadap F8Z563CWBLK - Amentio Datakjeden

However I have no idea which ones would work and I can't just keep buying different ones by trial and error, especially since all the ones I have tried already fail to charge my devices.

Can anyone offer some info on how this USB charging works and what to look out for?

Thanks!:)
 

AndroidHD

Banned
I have a number of USB Plugs, all charge my controllers. Actually one USB Plug charges my PS3 Tower Charger too.

Any Plug with the USB socket on it, will charge your peripherals.

:)
 

AndroidHD

Banned
Unfortunately that hasn't been my experience as you can see from OP :( Maybe I've just been unlucky?

I just tested my PS3 controllers, HTC DHD, and my iPad on my old iPod wall charger and one i got from the 99p store. All charge no problems.

At the end of the day it's a plug. Have you tried using a different socket :(:)
 

kLy

Standard Member
Yup the socket works (the light goes on on the adaptor) and I know the cables definitely work, I've used them countless times to charge the devices from a computer.

I've tried:
- The OEM adaptor I mentioned
- US iPhone AC adaptor (original)
- EU iPhone AC adaptor (original)
- US iPad AC adaptor (original)

At the end of the day it's a plug.

But that's exactly it, I don't think it is just a plug. I know for a fact the iPhone needs certain pins to be connected in the USB rather than just power being supplied to the power pin.

I know that other people have had the same problems charging the Sony Reader as well (see the comments at http://thinkwrap.wordpress.com/2007/06/04/strange-charging-behaviour-of-sony-reader/).

BUT everything charges fine when you plug it into a computer.

If you have a look at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usb#Power
there does seem to be some more complex logic involved in the USB power request and perhaps some devices rely on this.

I could of course shell out more and get the expensive Sony Reader specific charger for instance but of course I have no guarantee it will work with the other devices.
 
Last edited:

AndroidHD

Banned
Yup the socket works (the light goes on on the adaptor) and I know the cables definitely work, I've used them countless times to charge the devices from a computer.

I've tried:
- The OEM adaptor I mentioned
- US iPhone AC adaptor (original)
- EU iPhone AC adaptor (original)
- US iPad AC adaptor (original)



But that's exactly it, I don't think it is just a plug. I know for a fact the iPhone needs certain pins to be connected in the USB rather than just power being supplied to the power pin.

I know that other people have had the same problems charging the Sony Reader as well (see the comments at Strange charging behaviour of Sony Reader « Miro's World).

BUT everything charges fine when you plug it into a computer.

If you have a look at: Universal Serial Bus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
there does seem to be some more complex logic involved in the USB power request and perhaps some devices rely on this.

I could of course shell out more and get the expensive Sony Reader specific charger for instance but of course I have no guarantee it will work with the other devices.

Having read the links you posted..

One possible explanation is that the problem is more in indication, not in charging. The software running the Reader (Linux) may get confused about what is the actual state of the battery – because even if the charge shows one half, it does not seem like the battery was indeed half empty.

Above is a software related issue, not a charger problem.

And having had a quick look on CNET your Sony reader PRS 350 USB charging only works from PCs.

The Wiki link IMHO is just a run down of USB 1.0 and 2.0

If everything you charge works fine from your computer, i'm inclined to go towards software related charging problems as the new drivers will be installed before you charge. On a plug you don't get the drivers (Obvioulsy)

I'm interested to read other replies.

I am amazed and stunned that you can't charge your PS3 and XBOX controllers from any of your Plugs. I have tried all mine i can find and no problems.
 

kLy

Standard Member
And having had a quick look on CNET your Sony reader PRS 350 USB charging only works from PCs... If everything you charge works fine from your computer, i'm inclined to go towards software related charging problems as the new drivers will be installed before you charge. On a plug you don't get the drivers (Obvioulsy)

Nope, never installed a single driver on my Mac for the Reader. I'm extremely anal about crappy 3rd party kexts on my Mac. I've actually tried plugging the PRS-350 into my Apple TV, my Airport Extreme and my XBox 360 (call me crazy :)). Charges happily in each case so it's definitely not dependent on some specific driver on the PC.

The relevant interesting parts in that Wikipedia link to me is:
A unit load is defined as 100 mA in USB 2.0, and was raised to 150 mA in USB 3.0. A maximum of 5 unit loads (500 mA) can be drawn from a port in USB 2.0, which was raised to 6 (900 mA) in USB 3.0. Low-power devices draw at most 1 unit load, with minimum operating voltage of 4.4 V in USB 2.0, and 4 V in USB 3.0. High-power devices draw the maximum number of unit loads supported by the standard. All devices default as low-power but the device's software may request high-power as long as the power is available on the providing bus.
...
A Dedicated Charging Port can supply a maximum of 1.8 A of current at 5.25 V. A portable device can draw up to 1.8 A from a Dedicated Charging Port. The Dedicated Charging Port shorts the D+ and D- pins with a resistance of at most 200 Ω. The short disables data transfer, but allows devices to detect the Dedicated Charging Port and allows very simple, high current chargers to be manufactured

As you can see above there is some kind of negotiation going on as the device figures out how much power it's allowed to draw from the host, plus there are some chargers that short particular pins (this is perhaps what the Apple ones are doing?)

Thanks :)
 

kLy

Standard Member
AndroidHD, have you tried charging your controllers using the original Apple AC adaptors for your iPod/iPhone? Would be good to know since it's a single solid point of reference, whereas there's no way you or I would have exactly the same generic adaptors so it'll be comparing apples to oranges.
 

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