US HDTV: Down Res

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by kev_melon, Jan 8, 2003.

  1. kev_melon

    kev_melon
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    Hi folks,
    Don't know if I've put this thread in the right forum so please forgive me if I have!

    As well as surfing AV Forums I also like to take a look on what's happening over at the AV Science Forum. It seems that we here in the UK still have a lot to be thankful for when it comes to digital tv.

    This thread concerns the down-rezzing of HDTV in the US.

    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?postid=1620871#post1620871

    If and when HDTV does reach us in the UK do you think the same will happen here?
     
  2. They

    They
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    That's a big IF, but I suppose we will get HDTV here at some point but then considering the mess they are making of SDTV in digital form I don't hold out much hope of HDTV in the UK being particularly impressive.

    If copyright holders wish to protect thier property and don't wish unprotected hidef versions broadcast then that is thier call, it's just that all this should have been sorted out before punters in the US bought all those HDTVs without HDCP systems. I would imagine that if we get HDTV in the UK then it will have to have a HDCP system so down-rezzing won't be a problem (maybe!)
     
  3. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
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    We will probably make other mistakes instead if/when we get HDTV.
    HDCP (High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection) is already an issue for me personally work wise as I work for a (USA) IC company that happens to make FlatPanel Display ICs (basically Video Analog-to-Digital Converters with added digital circuitry) which incorporate HDCP hooks ; there are quite a few UK companies doing such designs with our (& competitors) chips. They have to get a licence from http://www.digital-cp.com/ (ultimately this is Intel's intellectual property).
    The USA ATSC system could have built on the EU/DVB 's OFDM modulation system but instead went for their own ATSC system mainly down to NIH (Not Invented Here) syndrome. It seems that their system isn't as robust as ours
    :D

    There are ongoing arguments concerning the cost of implementation into broadcasting infrastructure as well as the fact that (same as UK) there are not enough IDTVs and those that exist are all high-end/costly. This is the usual chicken or egg problem ; without plenty of HD material broadcast, the USA public won't be driven to purchase the TVs whilst the TV makers won't produce in volume (moving down the cost curve) until they know there is a market. So the arguments contimue as to how to reach critical mass with government & FCC involved.

    That said I have seen USA HDTV on a number of occasions in the last couple of years and it is stunning (on the right setup).

    Chris Muriel, Manchester.
     
  4. kev_melon

    kev_melon
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    Well, hopefully when/if HDTV does reach Blighty that if it does have HDCP that we aren't subjected to down-rezzing.

    I started this thread as I felt it was something that needed to be addressed should HDTV in any form reach these shores.

    Thanks guys, for replying!
     

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