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Upgrading to Projector

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by titanax, Jun 3, 2002.

  1. titanax

    titanax
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    Hi all, I am new to the world of projectors & I am hoping to get some pointers :)

    1. What's the difference between LCD & DLP technologies?

    2. One dealer told me that for HT, SVGA is more than ideal, as XGA & SXGA are more fo multimedia applications. Apparently, I won't notice the difference for HT use. Is that true?

    3. What is the ideal amount of brightness ? (ANSI right?)... ideally, about the same from a normal CRT TV, so that I can watch movies during the day, without having to turn my HT room into a complete dark-room !!

    4. My room measures about 4x2.7m, so what screen size should I get? Anything about the screens I should pay attention to? Any brand suggestions.

    5. Lastly, after getting valued feedback from all you worthy AVphiles....what should I look out for, when I go for a demo?

    Cheers!! :) :)
     
  2. Guest

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    1. What's the difference between LCD & DLP technologies?

    DLP is meant to be the big new PJ tech but quite frankly I've seen many players and found the picture, with the exception of a lack of screendoor effect, to be worse than LCD, at least on most cheap DLP's. LCD I think is a far better bet, i'ts much cheaper and has way better colours, more natural picture, bit worse contrast but all up better, course I'm sure some DLP adovocate will tell you the opposite;)

    2. One dealer told me that for HT, SVGA is more than ideal, as XGA & SXGA are more fo multimedia applications. Apparently, I won't notice the difference for HT use. Is that true?

    Yep, you won't notice it. DVD doesn't utilised the full resolution of even SVGA. The extra price for XGA is a waste of money unless your using it for data projecting. All up it doesn't hurt, but you don't need it.

    3. What is the ideal amount of brightness ? (ANSI right?)... ideally, about the same from a normal CRT TV, so that I can watch movies during the day, without having to turn my HT room into a complete dark-room !!
    I'd say 1000+ is good. Though my Hitachia pumps out 1100 but I almost always run it at 800 econo mode, the difference is very small, so I think brightness is a little overated in terms of home cinema. At the end of the day projectors will only look there best at night, doesn't matter how bright it is, they can't project black. Black levels will depend largely on your ambient light, so I wouldn't recommend using it for daytime viewing much.

    4. My room measures about 4x2.7m, so what screen size should I get? Anything about the screens I should pay attention to? Any brand suggestions.

    Big as possible! Varies from pj to pj but go as big as you can. Short throw lens will help.


    5. Lastly, after getting valued feedback from all you worthy AVphiles....what should I look out for, when I go for a demo?

    Screendoor, black levels, fan noise levels, mostly just use your judgement on what looks best. Make sure to check out the PJ with various sources, ie most stores will wow you with Toy Story or Shrek, but these are CG films that are the best looking PJ films, try out some DVD's you know and you'll get a better feel of how good a job the PJ is doing.

    Whichever projector you choose, you're still going to experience a monumental leap in your home cinema experience!:)
     
  3. Guest

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    Hmmm... dunno about some of MaxPower's advice.. Here's my take on your questions...

    1- LCD works by shining light through 3 LCD panels (red, green blue) and combining the result. In DLP projector light is bounced off a special chip, which has tiltable mirrors and projector through a colour wheel. The components of the picture (red, green and blue) are projected sequencially. As the images are projected in very quick succession our brain/eyes are fooled into seeing a full colour image (most of the time ;) ) As you can see the approach of the 2 methods is very different and each has its own (dis)advantages. In theory both types are very able to produce life-like cinematic pictures, but the end results are very projector dependant.

    2- SVGA is definitely not enough for projecting either PAL or NTSC widescreen images. a 16:9 anamorphic picture has 480 lines in NTSC and 576 in PAL. therefor you need at least a resolution of 480x854 to fit a NTSC picture or 576X1024 for PAL. 480x854 is precisely the size of the AE100's LCD panels (WVGA) and for PAL, 1024x768 (XGA) is the closest match. As far as I know there are no native widescreen PAL LCD's

    3- If you are not prepared to black out your room, you should not be considering front projection. To get a watchable picture in daylight you will have to use a data-grade projector, which almost always leads to a dissapointing cinema picture: high black levels, low contrast, artificial colours. If your only goal is to get a big picture though, go ahead. Keep a small TV to watch the news etc, and save your expensive lamp or tubes.

    4- To get a comfortable home cinema experience, you should position yourself between 1.5 and 2 screenwidths from the screen. Remember to leave some room for your speakers. I guess 2.3m - 2.4m wide would be nice.

    5- As mentioned above DLP and LCD both have their pros and cons.

    LCD
    +cheap, established technology, can produce good results, some PJs have long lamp life.
    -screendoor, dust sensitive (depends on PJ), PJs tend to be noisy (though not all are), vertical banding, low contrast, blacks tend to be grey.

    DLP
    +better contrast, potential for better colours, black blacks. Compact designs (even small). Fan noise can be lower. Less sensitive to dust.
    -rainbow artifacts (severity depens on the viewer), motion artifacs. More expensive than LCD. Lamp life tends to be lower.

    Be sure to see PJs of both types before you buy. Choose a PJ that's optimised for home cinema use. If possible go to a specialist dealer for demos, or even better, make a appointment with a board member. PJ's tend to be expensive so make your choise the right one. Don't rush into buying the first PJ you see. At first they all look awesome! At the moment CRT PJs still offer the best possible image, followed by DLP and lastly LCD. But! It all depends on the projector. The most expensive DLPs come close to CRT, but there are quite a few LCD PJs that better most DLPs. Also the take the image source in consideration. Some PJ work best with ordinary DVD players, others prefer a home theater PC.


    anyway , i wish you good luck in choosing your next toy ;)
     

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