Universal's Kornblau Wants Format War to Continue

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peterweg

Banned
There's no longer any question as to who's keeping the hi-def format war alive, or why.
It's Universal Studios and the top home entertainment exec, by his own admission.

I had been hearing over the last few days that various Blu-ray Disc manufacturers have been offering Universal plenty of incentives to join the parade but that Universal was walking away from the table every time without any reasonable objection.
Now we know why.

Universal president Craig Kornblau told me this week that the studio actually wants the format war to continue.
He also said Universal is getting financial incentives to create exclusive HD DVD features such as the Xbox Live component for the upcoming "Heroes" release.
"I'm not going to tell you that we don't cut financial deals with people every day," he says.

But he has rationale for all of the above.
Kornblau says Universal does the same as every other studio in cutting deals to utilize another company's technologies and services.

But Kornblau says Universal's position is not driven by deals but by a long-term and consumer-focused strategy that is supported by Universal parent NBC and corporate owner GE. Universal never initially wanted a war, he says, which is why the studio made a decision years ago to back only one format.

Of course, that's the same position taken by Disney as well as Fox; the only difference being they individually chose the opposing format for a number of their own reasons, not the least of which is that each independently told me from the beginning that they believe that Blu-ray will ultimately offer the most consumer satisfaction and that the technology represents a full step forward in technology -- not a half-step -- to ensure the longest-term value for consumers. And, most importantly to Fox from the outset and now others as well, an extra layer of protection against piracy.

However, now that the market has evolved as it has, Kornblau says the hi-def format war has been "the very best thing that ever happened for consumers, retailers, and, frankly, studios" -- everyone except consumer electronics manufacturers -- because it has driven prices down further and far more quickly than would have been the case if there had been only one format in the market. (CE manufacturers are no small exception since they were among the primary groups driving the introduction of hi-def discs in order to restore the profit into their business that long ago evaporated with $49 DVD players from China. The format war has already forced some manufacturers to start subsidizing their hi-def players.)
Without the format war, Kornblau believes that even after more than a year in the market, the lowest-priced players would still be priced out of reach of most consumers at more than $1,000 and they would only drop to $800 or $900 over the next year or two.

Of course, that's impossible to know for sure and it's a bit of a faulty premise if you consider that PlayStation 3's, which play Blu-ray Discs and are by far the top-selling hi-def disc player of either format, were introduced last November at $600. As for the cause and rate of price declines in players, 10 years ago the cost of DVD players dropped about 20% in the first year and another 30% in the second year without any format war, according to "CE Historical" at the Consumer Electronics Assoc. web site www.ce.org.

With Universal the only holdout in sticking with HD DVD exclusively, Kornblau reluctantly concedes that HD DVD's position is just fragile enough that if Universal decided to release in Blu-ray now, it would have a serious, if not life-threatening impact on the future of HD DVD. So in addition to weighing how his decision will impact the studio, he now must also factor in the potential demise of the HD DVD format entirely if Universal would opt to release its movies in Blu-ray.

For now, that's not something Kornblau is willing to risk. He says Universal chose HD DVD initially because it offered the least expensive hardware and software manufacturing costs and immediate across-the-board interactivity and connectivity in all HD DVD players. "To this date, nothing's changed," he suggests.

Kornblau believes interactive and connected features are essential for the success of any hi-def disc platform, especially as more and more consumers realize that they can buy a DVD player for $129 that upconverts their DVDs to near-hi-def quality.

"DVD would not have grown to a $16 billion market if all we did was put movies on a disc," he said. Enhanced features are even more critical for the success of hi-def discs, which do not offer as many revolutionary distinctions from DVD as did DVD over VHS.

In fact, Kornblau says the lack of comparable interactivity and connectivity in Blu-ray as compared with HD DVD at this point is why Universal refuses to go the same route as Warner and Paramount in releasing in both formats but being forced to offer less interactive and connected features on the Blu-ray versions, such as Warner's new "300."

Hmmm, with the notable exception of the "U-Control" interactive feature that Universal introduced on several titles last year, the studio hasn't exactly been blazing many trails of innovation with content that couldn't be delivered on Blu-ray Discs and even DVDs in many cases. Warner has been leading that charge with web-enabled features introduced on "Blood Diamond" and continuing through last week's "300." After about a year-and-a-half in the market, Universal's first web-enabled feature will come courtesy of Microsoft on the Aug. 28 release of "Heroes."

And, not for nothing, but early results of "300," at a record 250,000 copies sold in the first week, show that at least 65% of those sales went to Blu-ray. Some expected the numbers to skew even further in favor of Blu-ray given it's appeal to the PlayStation 3 demographic. PW: Evidently there is no difference between the two format demographic as the ratio matches all other sales figures.

Meanwhile Blu-ray promises even more dynamic connectivity features with its new "BD Live" component in Blu-ray players and titles coming as early as this fall, as well as further enhancements to its "BD-J" interactive technology.

Kornblau, who was kind enough to speak with me very frankly in the midst of a hectic time, also conceded that Universal could not have picked a worse time to be carrying the torch for HD DVD in terms of strong releases to help support its position and the platform.
Although Kornblau referred to his studio's weak movies over the past 9 months, Universal's release slate has been pretty dismal for the last several years. The studio had only two theatrical films in the top 30 at the domestic box-office in 2005 and it's lone top 20 title last year was 18th-ranked "The Break-Up," with $119 million, according to Boxofficemojo.com. After suffering through the first six months of this year with its biggest hits being the sleeper romantic comedy "Knocked Up" and the financial disaster "Evan Almighty," Universal is finally enjoying a solid franchise hit with last weekend's "The Bourne Ultimatum" opening with $69 million.
Kornblau sees all that as setting up a big fourth-quarter for his studio on the home entertainment and hi-def fronts, starting with "Heroes," followed by four $100 million-plus titles, "Knocked Up," "Evan Almighty," "I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry" ($92 million after 3 weeks), and "Bourne Ultimatum."

But that's pretty much the highlight for the rest of the year as far as programs available exclusively on HD DVD.
Almost everything else will be on Blu-ray, either exclusively or along with HD DVD, including everything from Steven Spielberg's first hi-def disc release, "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," exclusively on Blu-ray, to most of the top-grossing movies of the year, such as "Spider-Man 3," "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End" (both only on Blu-ray) "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" (not announced as yet); "300," "Ratatouille," "Wild Hogs," and "Blades of Glory" (the latter three only on Blu-ray). And as soon as Fox rejoins the BD party with its MGM distribution in tow -- which everyone hopes will be soon -- that studio could release its trio of summer hits exclusively on Blu-ray, "The Simpsons Movie," "Live Free or Die Hard," and "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer."

Even if, for the sake of argument, you go along with Universal's belief that the format war is driving prices down more quickly, Kornblau admits that there is only a limited window of time for which this situation can be interpreted as beneficial for consumers, retailers, and studios. He says that window will start to close when players drop to a price of $200 and consumers start making their choice, which is what will guide Universal's ultimate course.

So that's the story. Universal did not want the format war and Kornblau believes the studio did not initiate the war, but he and the studio are now intentionally and strategically keeping the format war alive for what they believe is for the good of the consumer, retailers and studios while awaiting a clear consumer preference for Blu-ray or HD DVD once prices drop to $200. Universal chose HD DVD because costs were lower and it had about a year's head-start on some interactive features and web connectivity.

Okay, Kornblau has always been straight with me so I have no reason to believe he doesn't truly believe most, if not all of that.

But if consumers are already showing a 2-1 Blu-ray preference for every movie released in both formats months before Blu-ray introduces its more sophisticated web-connected and interactive features and even while HD DVD is riding a low-price advantage of about $150 - $200, it's difficult to envision consumers becoming less interested in Blu-ray when all those features debut amid a flurry of the year's biggest movies exclusively on Blu-ray.

When that point comes, on behalf of those of us who don't believe that prolonging the format war is a good thing, I hope that Kornblau and Universal are quick to respond to the will of consumers and end this war.

In the meantime, I guess those customers who are already choosing Blu-ray will have to live without hi-def versions of "Knocked Up," "Evan Almighty" and "I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry" for awhile.

http://www.hollywoodinhidef.com/blog_detail.php?id=107
 

Sonic67

Banned
Seems like more spin from Blu-Ray. If things had gone as they should HD DVD would have released first, had a monopoly, got the sales and won. Blu-ray rushed an unfinished product to market as a spoiler and have now had to change things half way through to what they should have had in the first place.

Bearing in mind you are quoting from a blu-ray site what did you expect them to say anyway? Neither can you take what is said as accurate or neutral. An independent site I might have a little faith in.

I could pick the whole post to holes on every point. Yep quote Universals less than stellar releases as an example of output. Of course if that was representative of Universals studios why is this a problem for BR? Of course there had to be a mention of the wonderful BR releases as a way of reminding people what BR offers and of course get the Spielberg release in. Don't mention of course that Universal have many of his others which BR fans will be missing out on.

Yep BR will have better features in time. Shouldn't they have been there at the start and save consumers buying twice? Will future BR disks carry the old traditional extra features, new ones, both, have two different disk releases what? How is that good for the consumer? More confusion?

Yep well done to the PS3. Long term most people want a stand alone not a console and HD DVD standalones are getting to the very cheap stage. So long term the PS3 effect will be less of a factor. If it goes to long term, which is why BR need to kill this now. Long term dual formats players will be offering a solution. Again not good for a single format like Blu-ray currently in the lead.

One thing that has been obvious from the last few days. Universal is not going anywhere. Despite mounting pressure from Blu-rays advocates they are HD DVD and will be for a long time to come. They want to wait and see what effect HD DVD laptops will have! How long will that be?

So here it is. Buy blu-ray and be satisfied with BR's output. Buy HD DVD get a cheap product same PQ and sound but miss out on Spiderman, POTC etc. Go dual format and have it all because no one's budging and this is going to be a long haul. Anyone see anything different? Sah?
 

peterweg

Banned
Of course its a Blu-ray biased site.

However,I thinks its better to focus on what Universal are saying - the format war is good for consumers and will continue.
Blu-ray's opinion is that when additional format can be supported and prices on Blu-ray are at $200, HD-DVD will have lost its 'advantage' (I'd argue the relevance of additional content).
 

Sonic67

Banned
I think you will find it takes two sides to have a war. All studios could release on both formats and let the consumer decide. Can you see any Blu-ray studios doing that?

Does region coding help the consumer or the studio?

Does changing your system part way through help the consumer who may have already shelled out a lot of money for a player barely a year old. Two new models are being released now that cost £700 - £1000 and will be outmoded in a couple of months. Good for the consumer?

The article is written as big bad Universal. I'm suprised they don't organise an on line petition or print his address so he can't be barracked in the street.

When exactly do you think a blu-ray player will be $200? Also do you think it would happen if there wasn't a rival format? Toshiba are about to release 3rd gen players of which the top flight one will be less than $500. If there was no format war would we see cheap BR players?
 

Pecker

Distinguished Member
In the meantime, I guess those customers who are already choosing Blu-ray will have to live without hi-def versions of "Knocked Up," "Evan Almighty" and "I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry" for awhile...

...and 'Bourne...'

...and Universal's monsters for next year...

...and any film Warner want to held back for IME.

Steve W
 

Jeff

Distinguished Member
Aside from the obvious Blu-Ray fanboy spin, I completely agree with Universals stance. The format war is good for the studios and consumers and bad for CE companies. It's very ironic that Blu-Ray as a format was designed to protect CE company interests which is why initially the studios sided with HD-DVD and CE's sided with Blu Ray.
 

Jeff

Distinguished Member
...and 'Bourne...'

...and Universal's monsters for next year...

...and any film Warner want to held back for IME.

Steve W


I'm very happy to have Hot Huzz on HD-DVD, I'd much rather watch that than any of the Blu Ray blockbusters planned this year.
 

BadAss

Banned
This guys logic is a joke IMO.

Kornblau believes that even after more than a year in the market, the lowest-priced players would still be priced out of reach of most consumers at more than $1,000 and they would only drop to $800 or $900 over the next year or two.

If Toshiba went with Blu-ray from the off what would have stopped them driving prices down the same way as they've done for HD-DVD? Absolutely nothing.

Every other CE company would be chasing Toshibas drive the only difference is Kornblau wouldn't have any excuse not to release titles.

No wonder Steven Speilberg does't wan anything to do with Universal.

Kornblau is talking about HD as if it's a whole new market. It isn't. One sale for HD is a minus sale for DVD. There is no point driving down sales of harware, as software sales on the whole will remain the same. It's the same person who buys the HD version who would have bought the DVD!

I can't believe these type of people are in such high ranked jobs with wacky buisness sense.

The only way HD will make any studio more money than DVD is if the profit margins on HD software are bigger than those on DVD. With such small sales numbers that ain't going to happen, EVER!

The only other way to make more money on HD is if less people make pirate copies. Universal chose AACS only, it's already been cracked once! Fox and Disney know BD+ is the way to go for a new format.

So Universal want to support a format that drives Toshibas profits into the ground, creates no extra real sales over DVD, has a smaller profit margin over DVD, makes consumer fork out hundreds more on second player and has less copy protection than the opposing format. And after all that HD-DVD gets out sold 2:1 week in week out.

I thought Universal were in the business to make money by creating decent movies, not creat a format war to spite the companies they'll use in the future to play their movies on.

You don't **** in the pool your about to swim in.
 

Pecker

Distinguished Member
I note the 'journalist' believes 'Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer' will be big.

Reason enough to support HD DVD.

I don't mind this format war being won by film fans. I don't mind it being won by tech-heads. I don't mind it being won by the general public.

But does anyone here really want our future high def format to be chosen because PS3 owners will be rushing out to buy this rubbish?

If 'FF:ROTSS' sells more on high def than 'Hot Fuzz', and this sways the format war, every early-adopting film fan will rightly cringe.

Steve W
 

Sonic67

Banned
"Format war good for the consumer?"

Seems to me that if there was no format war how much would a next gen player be now? £700? £1000?

With a format war and heavy competition, going dual format is now under £600 and falling?

I doubt Toshiba would be bringing out 3rd gen players 6 months after second gen.

Just the inconvenience for many of having two players right? Is that what he's getting at? If so it seems to work. Blurayinhighdef want to paint it as "he says the format war is good for the consumer and he's prolonging it. Blame him."
 

Rasczak

Distinguished Member
Of course its a Blu-ray biased site.
It's a BluRay sponsered site - Fox, Disney and Sony are paying for it - it is as much as advert as those you see in magazines or on TV.
 

simonoaks

Active Member
As someone who has neither format and therefore completely neutral, I think the Universal statement was fair and made sense.

I don't know what purpose was trying to be served by a BD site putting it up, as I think it puts a good case forward for HD DVD.

Universal, are saying they backed a format as it was, in their opinion, the best technology and best for the consumer. They are now confirming they are still backing it as nothing has changed.

And there is never any harm in competition in the market; and none of it will matter once cheap decent dual players come out.
 

BadAss

Banned
If Universal were so consumer friendly why don't they put the price of their HD titles on par with DVD?
 

Jeff

Distinguished Member
Thats why it's good for studios too. :D More money to spend on discs.

At least they aren't charging Fox and Sony prices.
 

BadAss

Banned
I hope potential HD-DVD buyers read this pragraph before making a purchase.

With Universal the only holdout in sticking with HD DVD exclusively, Kornblau reluctantly concedes that HD DVD's position is just fragile enough that if Universal decided to release in Blu-ray now, it would have a serious, if not life-threatening impact on the future of HD DVD. So in addition to weighing how his decision will impact the studio, he now must also factor in the potential demise of the HD DVD format entirely if Universal would opt to release its movies in Blu-ray.
 

Sonic67

Banned
No wonder Steven Speilberg does't wan anything to do with Universal.
Any chance of a link or quote? He seems to have done plenty of films with Universal. I’ve not seen anything from Spielberg yet to say he has insisted on going Blu-ray either. The nearest I’ve seen was something hinting along those lines and that came from his ‘Sony’ studio.
Kornblau is talking about HD as if it's a whole new market. It isn't. One sale for HD is a minus sale for DVD.
Not true. Most people have bought a lot of VHS videos. Many bought Laser disk, then came DVD then came HD. Film studios are selling some of their product over and over again sometimes to same the people.

I have three copies of ‘Apocalypse Now’ on VHS, Video CD and DVD. I may even get it again in HD. Four sales from one product and that doesn’t count the studios revenue made at the box office or Satellite, cable, TV etc. For the studio it’s the gift that keeps on giving. Even if people don’t buy a disk on HD this time what about in the future when the next format comes along?

Studios want everyone to buy into HD not because they have love us but because they can sell us the same films once again.
There is no point driving down sales of harware, as software sales on the whole will remain the same. It's the same person who buys the HD version who would have bought the DVD!
You sell people a printer you make money from the printer cartridges. Do you think people will buy a player for $200 and watch no films on it? Also HD disks are priced higher than DVD.

Take Spiderman 1 and 2. How much is that on blu-ray? Tesco is selling a four disk Spiderman set, both films for £5. I saw it in the store on Monday night. How much would it cost to buy both Spiderman films on blu-ray? From HMV £25 each? So that’s £50? So what would Sony rather you bought? Which will give them the biggest profits? Add in that a Spiderman fan will buy DVD and blu-ray and both on launch too.

So how do you get people buying the disks for the 500% mark up? Make sure they get a subsidised game console sold at less than cost perhaps?

I can't believe these type of people are in such high ranked jobs with wacky buisness sense.

The only way HD will make any studio more money than DVD is if the profit margins on HD software are bigger than those on DVD. With such small sales numbers that ain't going to happen, EVER!
(sigh) Do you think sales will stay small or grow when we all have these players?

The only other way to make more money on HD is if less people make pirate copies. Universal chose AACS only, it's already been cracked once! Fox and Disney know BD+ is the way to go for a new format.

Do you believe that blu-ray is uncrackable? I work in signals and codes. You can crack anything with a 'brute force' method. If there is 6 billion possible encodes for a signal, fine, stick a big powerful computer on it and let it look at every one. All. Six. billion. Anything that makes any kind of sense alert the operator and let him check it out.

It's difficult for a slow computer as it could take thousands of years. However, computers get more powerful all the time. Aside from that I studied computers with the OU. People write systems in the same way a guy might build a castle wall for security. Someone out there takes a good look at the castle wall and then comes up with a hot air balloon. Nothing is ever 100% secure the best you can hope for is to inconvenience the casual pirate. Not only that once one person has cracked it it’s on the Net.
So Universal want to support a format that drives Toshibas profits into the ground, creates no extra real sales over DVD, has a smaller profit margin over DVD, makes consumer fork out hundreds more on second player and has less copy protection than the opposing format. And after all that HD-DVD gets out sold 2:1 week in week out.
Well the PS3 must make things really awkward for BR developers. How do you sell a £1000 player when there’s a £400 one on the market? Who came up with that one? Sales of both formats have consistently increased. Sales have been 2:1 for months. If blu-ray sales are increasing HD DVD sales must be too. It would be different if HD DVD sales were dropping. Surely they should be in free fall?
I thought Universal were in the business to make money by creating decent movies, not creat a format war to spite the companies they'll use in the future to play their movies on.

You don't **** in the pool your about to swim in.
Universal still create movies and they still release them on DVD. By buying into HD you are fully aware that there is a format war on and you are deliberately choosing a side. Don’t complain once you’re in it. When I was being shelled in Iraq I never thought, "I wish someone had told me there was a war on – I’d never have got involved."
 

Pecker

Distinguished Member
I hope potential HD-DVD buyers read this pragraph before making a purchase.

As you're a BD fan, it shouldn't surprise anyone that you'd like potential HD DVD buyers to read a biased point written for a BD-promoting website.

I thought Universal were in the business to make money by creating decent movies, not creat a format war

I think you'll find the article says:

Universal did not want the format war and Kornblau believes the studio did not initiate the war

Steve W
 

Sonic67

Banned
I hope potential HD-DVD buyers read this pragraph before making a purchase.

I think we all know that would be a major thing. So given all that we have learned over the last few days do you think Universal will be going format neutral because the more these nuggets that the BR fans find the less likely it turns out Universal are going to switch. Right?

Anyway if it happens for a few hundred quid I've watched some excellent films and been very happy. Can't complain on that. Tonight it's 'Brotherhood Of The Wolf'.

Oh Badass where have you been? I've missed you so much. :hiya:
 

BadAss

Banned
Any chance of a link or quote? He seems to have done plenty of films with Universal. I've not seen anything from Spielberg yet to say he has insisted on going Blu-ray either. The nearest I've seen was something hinting along those lines and that came from his ‘Sony' studio.

Close encounters comes to Blu-ray soon. Whats coming to HD-DVD?

Not true. Most people have bought a lot of VHS videos. Many bought Laser disk, then came DVD then came HD. Film studios are selling some of their product over and over again sometimes to same the people.
I have three copies of ‘Apocalypse Now' on VHS, Video CD and DVD. I may even get it again in HD.

Studios want everyone to buy into HD not because they have love us but because they can sell us the same films once again.

But we've already seen sales of back catalog titles are dwaft by day and date releases.

You sell people a printer you make money from the printer cartridges. Do you think people will buy a player for $200 and watch no films on it? Also HD disks are priced higher than DVD.

Actualy alot of people just go out and buy a better quality printer for little more than a new cartrige. I know I do. But I depend on how often you use it.

Take Spiderman 1 and 2. How much is that on blu-ray? Tesco is selling a four disk Spiderman set, both films for £5. I saw it in the store on Monday night. How much would it cost to buy both Spiderman films on blu-ray? From HMV £25 each? So that's £50? So what would Sony rather you bought? Which will give them the biggest profits? Add in that a Spiderman fan will buy DVD and blu-ray and both on launch too.

Exactly better to make $1 on 1 million units than $2 on 50,000.

If people are price conscious enough not to spend over $200 on a HD player are they suddenly going to splash out $50 on Spiderman when they already own it on DVD? I doubt it.

So how do you get people buying the disks for the 500% mark up? Make sure they get a subsidised game console sold at less than cost perhaps?

People either see then benifit on their HDTV or they don't. PQ and AQ is all they should worry about.

(sigh) Do you think sales will stay small or grow when we all have these players?

I don't know.

Do you believe that blu-ray is uncrackable?

I hope so or goodbye Fox and Disney.

Well the PS3 must make things really awkward for BR developers. How do you sell a £1000 player when there's a £400 one on the market? Who came up with that one?

Some one better get round to Meridian quick and tell them Toshibas going for broke. :rotfl:
 

Pecker

Distinguished Member
Goodbye Fox & Disney?

Well, that depends on your point of view.

Have Fox & Disney chosen BD because they'd rather have the extra encryption, or because they point-blank refuse to do without it?

If it's the latter, then you're right.

If it's the former, you're wrong.

Ultimately, money talks.

If, for the sake opf argument, HD DVD took off and BD died, or BD+ became crackable, they'd have to weigh up security issues vs all the other studios making a packet from high def and them making zero.

How would you guess they'd go then?

Steve W
 

Sonic67

Banned
I hope so or goodbye Fox and Disney.

Don't they still release on DVD? I'd say the biggest reason why initially you won't see many HD films pirated is more down to the large file sizes involved.
 

BadAss

Banned
Goodbye Fox & Disney?

Well, that depends on your point of view.

Have Fox & Disney chosen BD because they'd rather have the extra encryption, or because they point-blank refuse to do without it?

If it's the latter, then you're right.

If it's the former, you're wrong.

Ultimately, money talks.

If, for the sake opf argument, HD DVD took off and BD died, or BD+ became crackable, they'd have to weigh up security issues vs all the other studios making a packet from high def and them making zero.

How would you guess they'd go then?

Steve W

I believe Fox would pull out of HD completely. Disney might follow Fox.

The end result is DVD wins. Blu-ray and HD-DVD remain niche products along with PSP until a new format comes along.

I doubt Fox would churn out all its titles to have them ripped and put on the internet out of good will.
 

Sonic67

Banned
Do you think I'd plumb for a HD-DVD player and a load of disc after reading that paragraph? Would anyone?

http://www.avforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=5118741&postcount=29

I don't know,

Originally Posted by Sonic67
Just one question. If in six months time Universal have NOT switched, neither do they give any indication they will and HD DVD players are below £200 would you get one?

Interesting what you say as since the war started there has only been one title on BD I fancied having.


Originally Posted by BadAss
"I've said on the rare occasion that if we get past CES 2008 and still no word or rumour on Universal then I might start to come around to the idea, but I 100% believe what's happening in the UK, Japan, China, Australia, Germany, France, Italy and all the other BD led territories, will force Universal to go neutral at some point."
 

Pecker

Distinguished Member
The longer time goes on the less value you get from your HD-DVD purchase. Some poeple here have had HD-DVD for a year now and have had alot of enjoyment, good for them. But heading into Christmas when sales of both formats is going to rise I realy feel for the people that are buying into a format that Kornblau admits might die if Universal decide to support Blu-ray.

HD DVD players are currently as cheap as £200 (actually spotted for less than 150).

There comes a price where, even if there are no HD DVD exclusives, it's worth buying a HD DVD player.

It's approaching Christmas 2008, and you have a HD Ready TV, and let's say you can get a HD DVD player for £49 from Tesco. Let's say BD players are still £300.

Why wouldn't you buy a HD DVD player as your next DVD player?

Why wouldn't you buy the odd film in high def?

What if some mainstream DVDs came out on DVD/HD DVD combo?

Just a thought.

Steve W
 

BadAss

Banned
http://www.avforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=5118741&postcount=29

I don't know,

Originally Posted by Sonic67
Just one question. If in six months time Universal have NOT switched, neither do they give any indication they will and HD DVD players are below £200 would you get one?

Interesting what you say as since the war started there has only been one title on BD I fancied having.


Originally Posted by BadAss
"I've said on the rare occasion that if we get past CES 2008 and still no word or rumour on Universal then I might start to come around to the idea, but I 100% believe what's happening in the UK, Japan, China, Australia, Germany, France, Italy and all the other BD led territories, will force Universal to go neutral at some point."

And?
 
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