Under cupboard kitchen lighting - Shelley?

Thursday

Member
I am about to start a kitchen refurb and plan to replace existing mini fluorescents under the cupboards with led lighting. I'm not sure whether a Shelley RGBW2 would be the right choice for control and would appreciate some advice.

The mini fluorescents are in 3 groups each with their own mains power feed all controlled from 1 wall switch. The groups are a 4m run of cupboards on one side of the room and two 2m runs either side of a hob/extractor. Where the mains feed splits for each I have no idea but assume in the ceiling void.

I like the idea of tunable led strip but I'm a bit lost as to what/which to buy and whether I need just 2 strips with the one on the hob/extractor having a connector to bridge the gap. Or can I have just one strip with large and small connectors to bridge the gaps. Or do I need 3 strips? That would mean 3 power blocks. Does that also mean 3 Shelley RGBW2s? I assume so. I don't need the strips to be individually controllable but operate as one group. I will replace the existing switch with a 3 way retractive switch.

As you can see, I'm a bit lost. Any advice gratefully received. Thanks.
 

Seb Briggs

Distinguished Member
I would use the 4 channels on the RGBW2 module to link to each strip or downlight then they can be controlled separately or together
 
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Thursday

Member
Thanks, I'll talk with the electrician.

Could be that I bite the bullet and get him to replace the existing 2 gang switch (under cupboard and ceiling lights) with a 4 gang - I will have a plasterer in anyway. Then I could have 1 switch for the under cupboards with RGBW2, 1 switch for the over sink downlighters, 1 switch for the over dining table downlighters/pendants and 1 switch for the other ceiling downlighters. I guess maybe a Shelley 1 or Shelley 2.5 combo for those?

It's really helpful to talk this through with you. Thank you.
 
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Seb Briggs

Distinguished Member
That sounds like a good idea and will give you full control individually on the lights. Though the downlighters i'd say dimmer2 module so you can dim them
 
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Thursday

Member
Yes, you're right. I'll need a dimmer 2 for at least the over sink downlighters and I may as well have the other dimmable too.

That's a lot of relays to try and fit behind the switches though. The obvious thing would be to put them, or some of them, in the ceiling void but I'm a bit anxious about doing that as I've heard a few horror stories about the dimmer 2 overheating to 97C + (even though it has a thermal cut-out incorporated which should prevent that).

If I'm having to have wall hacked out maybe I should also have a dedicated relay box with a blanking panel somewhere above the cupboards out of sight?
 
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Thursday

Member
I guess. It's just the idea of something smouldering away in the ceiling void undetected. In a dedicated box sitting on top of the cupboard I feel it is less likely to go unnoticed and a smoke alarm would pick it up.

I'm probably worrying unnecessarily :)
 
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Thursday

Member
Sounds like a plan. I suspect a RGBW2 and three dimmer 2 will get pretty hot and will need decent separation and ventilation. Don't supposed my electrician will be happy though . . .

Now just need to source the right RGBW strip that can deal with the load and connection requirements. And switches too. Thinking I should look at something in a grid system that can fit retractive and momentary in the same grid.

Then I can start worrying about the other rooms ;)
 
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Seb Briggs

Distinguished Member
I always use hiline lighting for my led strips , get 24v 14.4


You then need a driver psu I’d suggest 200w , that doesn’t need to be dimmable


run each of the 3 sections off a different output on the module if just using white
 
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Seb Briggs

Distinguished Member
Wiring
 

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Thursday

Member
Thanks Seb for the advice. I'll take a look at your recommendations.

Wondering why you say to run the 3 sections off a different output on the RGBW2? Will that give better performance? Maybe by removing the need for quite long connectors? It would require additional cable runs to each section compared to one strip (?) and I don't need individual control, so simpler the better.
 
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Thursday

Member
Ah, OK, thanks.

I noticed that the strip you recommended is IP00. I had assumed that as it will be under cupboards with hob and kettle producing steam if not splashes, that I'd need at least IP65? I know that will reduce choice and may also give heat issues meaning I may have to also use something like aluminium tracks to help with dissipation though. What do you think?

Again, thanks for your help with this. Much appreciated and I'd like to give something back. I saw on another thread that you support some charities. If ok with you I'll be making a contribution as appreciation.
 
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Thursday

Member
Great, thanks. Had a quick search but couldn't see the IP65 version. I'll have another look later.

Are there connectors readily available for this or is it a cut and solder job?
 
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Thursday

Member
Hi Seb. That psu is out of stock. I've emailed them and asked when they expect new stock. If more than a week or so I'll go for another equivalent.

Think I'm set to go now. All I'm a little uncertain about is the RGBW2 dimming at switch. I've been through the stuff you posted above but I'm not 100% confident. When I come to it I'll work it out I expect. I'm fairly technically competent. But if you happen to have a link to anything else I can read or maybe a youtube video, that would be great. I don't want to keep pestering you :)
 
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Seb Briggs

Distinguished Member
ive not actually used that method as my RGBW strips arent on a switch but the principle is easy enough

You are unlikely to do anything disastrous so just give it a go.

I will have a look at the actual HTTP/URL commands you need to add to help you though but maybe not today
 
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Thursday

Member
OK, thank you very much. Wiring for the RGBW2 is the same however switched I think (?) so I can always get it installed and sort out the switch dimming functionality in software later.

I thought I'd need a retractive switch same as for a dimmer2 but you said earlier in the thread that it needs to be momentary. Not sure how you would dim with a one button momentary. Is it one push and hold for up and 2 pushes and hold for down?

BTW. Hi-line lighting have replied that they will no longer be selling the EC range of LED drivers so won't be getting new stock in They strongly recommend their "premium" drivers instead which have a higher power factor.
 
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Seb Briggs

Distinguished Member
There is no option for retractive switches for the RGBW2, as in effect is two switches

Yes you are correct how the momentary works,

short key press = on/off

hold down = dims up

press and hold again = dims down


I may have linked the wrong driver as I normally use the Premium myself.
 
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