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Uhd HDMI cable

langers2011

Active Member
I'm just looking for some clarification.

I am sending a uhd signal from my Xbox to marantz receiver, then to my projector, which is on a 12m HDMI 2.0a cable.

Now everything I'm reading is saying that I simply cannot receive a 4k signal at 60hz. Why? Has this information changed? As I'm getting a 4k hdr signal perfectly at 24hz, 50hz and 60hz.
 

langers2011

Active Member
I'm more looking at the question "is there something I'm missing with the cable I have" rather than discrediting the long cables don't work statement.
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
HDMI Version Numbers are not relevant to cable types or specs.

Any 12m Copper Cable will be ‘Standard Speed’ (if officially Certified) or not Certified - Certification is a very expensive undertaking so many cable designs never go near a Test Centre.

There is no hard limit on what any cable will carry - unless the cable includes an Active chip set which will have pre determined capabilities.

Your 12m Cable may be capable of carrying 2160p at 60/50/24 at all bit rates - it is just that that is not usually ‘the norm’ and most cables/systems would be unreliable or not produce any image at 12m.

Joe
 

langers2011

Active Member
HDMI Version Numbers are not relevant to cable types or specs.

Any 12m Copper Cable will be ‘Standard Speed’ (if officially Certified) or not Certified - Certification is a very expensive undertaking so many cable designs never go near a Test Centre.

There is no hard limit on what any cable will carry - unless the cable includes an Active chip set which will have pre determined capabilities.

Your 12m Cable may be capable of carrying 2160p at 60/50/24 at all bit rates - it is just that that is not usually ‘the norm’ and most cables/systems would be unreliable or not produce any image at 12m.

Joe

Thanks very much for clearing that up. I was beginning to believe there was something I was thoroughly misunderstanding .

The cable was and is advertised as high speed and capable of handling 18gbps. But I guess that is a marketing ploy?
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
No passive HDMI cable has passed the official 'High Speed' certification programme at anything over 8m - what tends to happen is folk have a shorter length Certified and then apply that claim to all lengths assembled using the same key components (Cable stock and Connectors).

Good that the cable is working in your system - the whole device chain plays a part in a working or not working system not just the cable.

Joe
 

langers2011

Active Member
No passive HDMI cable has passed the official 'High Speed' certification programme at anything over 8m - what tends to happen is folk have a shorter length Certified and then apply that claim to all lengths assembled using the same key components (Cable stock and Connectors).

Good that the cable is working in your system - the whole device chain plays a part in a working or not working system not just the cable.

Joe

Thanks again for the clarity.

I wonder if the signal would work directly from the Xbox or if the marrantz sending the signal is the key!

Really appreciate the explanation!
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Signal chain - you can certainly experience different results depending on which devices are in the signal path, changing the bit depth, enabling HDR etc can also cause a signal to fall over.

Joe
 

langers2011

Active Member
Low and behold I may have answered my question.

I've yet to try more. But blade runner 2049 looked immaculate. However watching Batman begins uhd now and I am noticing a lot of grain? I'm not sure if this is how it's shot, or if this is an issue. It's like mild static.
Could or would that be a symptom of cabling? I assumed it either would, or would not work, with it being digital .
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
If the signal was being disrupted by the cable you either see No signal, an Intermittant signal or White/Coloured speckles across the image.

If you are seeing grain that is more likely to be how the Movie is presented.

Joe
 

langers2011

Active Member
If the signal was being disrupted by the cable you either see No signal, an Intermittant signal or White/Coloured speckles across the image.

If you are seeing grain that is more likely to be how the Movie is presented.

Joe
It's difficult to explain. It's is like grain. But it isn't static In motion, it's as if the pixels are "dancing" .
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Try changing the Output format of the Source and or if possible connect the Source via a short (less than 8m) cable as a test.

Joe
 

langers2011

Active Member
Try changing the Output format of the Source and or if possible connect the Source via a short (less than 8m) cable as a test.

Joe
Ive tried various output formats etc. But it has made no difference.
It may very well be as the film is intended .But perhaps it aggravates me far more than it is meant to. The backgrounds appeared grainy, yet the higher brightness areas of foreheads etc, seemed to be shimmering.
I'll test a few more things. I'vegot an optical turning up on prime that I can test first, or send back if no better.
I've read some people saying this is an attorbute of dlp, but I never experienced it with my.old optoma gt750.
 

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