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TX100 Movie1 & Movie2

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by moco, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. moco

    moco
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    The Hitachi TX100 manual is quite deficient, explaining what each menu item does but not the meaning of each action.
    Does anyone know what the Movie1 & Movie2 aspect ratios are good for?
    Are these known terms, or Hitachi names?
     
  2. KraGorn

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    They're not generic terms, but I would guess that they select between maybe 4:3 and 19:6 aspect ratio .. hopefully another Hitachi owner can shed some light.

    OTOH, empirical results often tell you :) .. what happens to the projected image when you select them?
     
  3. moco

    moco
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    No, there are actually 5 aspect ratios to choose from: 3:4, 16:9, Wide, Movie1, Movie2.
    The 1st two are clear - they are 1 to 1 (no distortion or cropping) of the respective input signal. (or linear distortion of the opposite input).
    "Wide" takes a 3:4 input and displays 16:9 without distortion on the middle part of the image, and large horizontal stretching on the outer sides.
    Seeing with my own eyes the effects does not help me understand when it is useful to choose the last two.
     
  4. moco

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    Attached are the diagrams from the TX100 manual that provide the only hint.
    It is clear from the diagrams what is happening.
    What is not clear to me, is in what cases which ratio is useful.
    E.g. "Wide" is useful when you want to see a TV 3:4 image on the full 16:9 available pj image, because normally the important part of an image is in the middle and that part is not stretched.
     

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  5. KraGorn

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    Ah, okay, I think I see perhaps what these do.

    When you play a movie in 2.35:1 ratio you get black bars top and bottom due to the aspect ratio of the image not being the same as that of the display .. a widescreen display is 16:9 aka. 1.78:1.

    These two setting seem to 'zoom' the image to eliminate the black borders .. of course in doing that they chop off the left and right edges of the image.

    It's a sort of 'pan and scan' operation which is used to render a wide-screen image on to a 4:3 standard TV display for example.
     
  6. moco

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    I also thought so, but it doesn't come out right.
    When you stretch a 2.35 or 1.85 film to fill the height of a 1.78 image, you have to crop of some of the sides.
    The diagram for Movie1 shows the opposite - cropping of of the top and bottom.
    Also note that the middle circle become an ellipse elongated in the vertical direction. This fits your idea, but it is elongated too much.
    Maybe there are source films that come with bottom and top black bars in the source? Maybe in TV broadcasts of some films.

    Movie2 is even more bewildering because it is not symmetric, only the top overflows.
     
  7. KraGorn

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    True, I hadn't looked carefully enough.

    In that case I'm bemused, they don't seem to sever a useful purpose that I can see then.
     
  8. maj74

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    HI,

    It looks to me as if KraGoprn is right. These modes seem to zoom a 2.35:1 picture to fit the height of a 16:9 screen.

    Remember that with a 2.35:1 picture, the top and bottom of the picture will be black bars, which is exactly the bit you do want to get rid off! The unfortunate side effect is that as already noted, you lose some of the sides.

    Now the Movie 2 settings initially looks silly, but I suspect it is designed to do the same job as movie 1, but that it retains the lower part of the picture for when it has subtitles on it.
     
  9. maj74

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    KraGorn.... sorry, can't even type properly this evening!!!
     
  10. moco

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    Makes sense to me now. In my last post I was assuming wrongly that the stretch will be without distortion (same rate vert. and horiz.) and it is vert. only.
    In any case these modes are not for me. I despise distortion of any kind.
    The TX100 black level is dark enough, and the image can be lens shifted so the top is at the lower edge of my static mask.
     
  11. sapgem

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    Other uses include:

    Movie 2 is good for 4:3 sport, particularly football, nothing much happens in the top fifth or so.

    Wide and Movie 1 are good for certain DVDs that have been encoded in an oldie world way. Off the top of my head, Wide is needed for English Patient which is 4:3 but with a 2.35:1 image stretched vertically and Movie 1 is good for Dune which is 4:3 but with a non-stretched 2.35:1 image. I assume many other DVDs were encoded in these bizarre ways in the bad old days.
     
  12. KraGorn

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    Good thinking that man, highly probable I'd say. :smashin:
     
  13. moco

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    All the above ideas are right, but it is actually meant for 3:4 input. Notice that for 3:4 input there is no distortion in Movie1 and Movie2 - the circle remains a circle.
    Many times films are broadcast on TV in letterbox mode and not Pan & Scan (and rightfully so). Movie1 spreads the part of the image with the actual picture on the TX100 native 16x9 panel, losing at the top and bottom the part of the broadcast image that is black (I do not know whether it is exact for 16:9, 1.85 or 2.35, but it is always at least approximately a good idea).
    Movie2 keeps the bottom, as maj47 said, when you have subtitles on the bottom black bar. No stretching in both cases.
    I was concentrating all the time on widescreen input, and this really makes sense for 3:4 input, namely, letterboxed films on TV.
     
  14. moco

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    By sheer coincidence, one day after my last post I got to enjoy the Movie1 setting.
    The American (Zone 1) DVD of "Day of the Jackal" is in 4:3 format, but the image consists of a letterboxed widescreen image.
    Movie1 set it just right :)
     

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