Two Years in the Hyundai Kona Electric EV

PRESSTOG

Well-known Member
Interesting read, I'm waiting on delivery of a 64K Ultimate

You will love it as a car, at first I was disappointed in my 2018 one when I first got it as i felt it was boring. That was coming from bmw i3 which was really out there and a Zoe which was well french'.. The Kona just felt like a normal car and a bit boring. But after a while I realised I was confusing boring for normal, it was just like any other normal car you don’t have range anxiety or a lot of those other issues you got with early EVs. It was just like going back to a decent reliable normal car.

The Ultimate like the PSE it replaces has so many toys it’s great and things like the cooled seats are a godsend in summer, head up display is brilliant and the infotainment is one of the best.

The only thing that is holding it back now for high mileage drivers is the charging speed at 77kw max it’s slower than most of the new stuff. But the long range and high efficiency make up for it
 

ashenfie

Well-known Member
It does seam amazing the this issue with these battery is only coming to light now. Mobile phone company has issues with them catching fire, Boeing had issue with them catching fire, one of top gears Richard Hamonds famous crashes took a week to put out the car due to the batteries etc etc.

I had assumed these issues had been resolved but seams not. For sure LG Chem have an issue and the scope of the issue???

I am think it's better to be sitting on the fence right now.
 

gangzoom

Well-known Member
I hope this isn't a sign of something bad coming for LG!!


@ashenfie The number of fires relative to car totals isn't massive, 10 per 100k+ currently. The biggest issue is these packs can spontaneously combust where as petroleum is actually very stable until exposed to a heat/ignition source.

So although combustion cars catch on fire its usually during operation or at least when electrical systems are on, so someone is around. Thermal runaway however can occur at any time, and the headline GM will be dreading is fatalities in a house with the EV pack been the cause of the fire, hence the drastic action to stop Bolt production and now telling owners to park 50 yards away from other cars!!!

Hyundia are taking a risk with not pushing the same message for the Kona, or else they are confident the BMS can detect potential thermal runaway quickly enough to isolate the cells.

Tesla does seem to have managed to mitigate the risk via software changes to the BMS, but vertical integration Tesla has interms of understanding cell construction and than car production/usage is a luxury most EV manufacturer don't have.

We'll have to see how all this plays out for LG, Nissan/Zoes have no such issues, so batteries can be made very robust.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
You've just reminded me that one of my old phones has swelled up like a balloon, probably best I don't keep it amongst the important paperwork on my desk :facepalm:
 

Delvey

Distinguished Member
I hope this isn't a sign of something bad coming for LG!!


@ashenfie The number of fires relative to car totals isn't massive, 10 per 100k+ currently. The biggest issue is these packs can spontaneously combust where as petroleum is actually very stable until exposed to a heat/ignition source.

So although combustion cars catch on fire its usually during operation or at least when electrical systems are on, so someone is around. Thermal runaway however can occur at any time, and the headline GM will be dreading is fatalities in a house with the EV pack been the cause of the fire, hence the drastic action to stop Bolt production and now telling owners to park 50 yards away from other cars!!!

Hyundia are taking a risk with not pushing the same message for the Kona, or else they are confident the BMS can detect potential thermal runaway quickly enough to isolate the cells.

Tesla does seem to have managed to mitigate the risk via software changes to the BMS, but vertical integration Tesla has interms of understanding cell construction and than car production/usage is a luxury most EV manufacturer don't have.

We'll have to see how all this plays out for LG, Nissan/Zoes have no such issues, so batteries can be made very robust.
Good explanation. Also combustion engines don't usually catch fire, it is down to normally an electrical fault or a fuel line rupturing. Vauxhall are infamous for fires.
 

Phill104

Active Member
Good explanation. Also combustion engines don't usually catch fire, it is down to normally an electrical fault or a fuel line rupturing. Vauxhall are infamous for fires.
Made me chuckle that. A few years back I had an Astra. After loads of problems and weeks in the garage I got it back. Drove from the garage to an RAF airfield with my boss in the car. We were both commenting we could smell fuel but just assumed it was because the Vauxhall dealership had left the car in a right mess. We pulled up at security and flames appeared from the bonnet. By then we were just a couple of meters from a fuel bowser so it got real very quickly. Fortunately the RAF fire engine was there in seconds and I mean seconds. In less than five minutes from us stopping they had the bonnet up and loading it with foam. Seem the garage crimped the fuel line between the head and the block so it was spraying fuel. Car written off in the end, it was a company car.

Speaking to the insurance company I was told that fires accounted for about 17 per 1000 write offs, quite a high figure. There were EVs back then so they were not in the count. Would be interesting to know what the figures are these days for ICE cars. Hopefully lower now. Just a couple of years back two young girls died trapped in their car after hitting a deer. The car caught fire and despite people trying to help it was too rapid. That is the big difference, EV fires tend to be a lot slower, fuel often engulfs very rapidly.
 

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