Tv upgrade - worth paying extra for OLED?

JustTheFacts

Active Member
Yep that sums my viewing I am afraid sky sports news / sky Chanel’s
There have been over 15 million OLEDs sold since 2018. Almost all of the reports of burn in are on 2017 and older OLEDs. Since 2018 there are very few reports of OLED burn in. This goes for the millions of owners that watch sky news and have static images on their OLEDs constantly. Your OLED is far more likely to fail from other discrepancies than burn in. Buy a Sony or LG OLED and you will have a TV that should perform flawlessly for 10 to 20 years.
 

sebna

Member
There have been over 15 million OLEDs sold since 2018. Almost all of the reports of burn in are on 2017 and older OLEDs. Since 2018 there are very few reports of OLED burn in. This goes for the millions of owners that watch sky news and have static images on their OLEDs constantly. Your OLED is far more likely to fail from other discrepancies than burn in. Buy a Sony or LG OLED and you will have a TV that should perform flawlessly for 10 to 20 years.
Do you have any data to back it up?

I am all in Oled fan but that just seems a bit too miraculous of the shift in fundamental oled technology flaw.

Advocatus diaboli.
 
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JustTheFacts

Active Member
Do you have any data to back it up?

I am all in Oled fan but that just seems a bit too miraculous of the shift in fundamental oled technology flaw.

Advocatus diaboli.
The best data is test data. When you finish engineering a car, for instance, you do a crash test to find out how the car will perform in the event of a crash. Likewise, when you perform over 15 million tests on OLEDs by actual owners you can assume the TVs are reliable with respect to burn in.

On the 2017 and older models burn in was rare. There are many owners (the majority) that used their TVs in the same manner as those that experienced burn in and never noticed any burn in at all. This panel lottery suggest it could have been due to the manufacturing and not the engineering. It really doesn't matter what the cause was of burn in on 2017 and older TVs. When you perform longevity tests on over 15 million 2018 and newer OLEDs the sample size is large enough to make the results trustworthy.

There is no need to read why burn in could exist; engineering, manufacturing, well rtings.com said, Dodgexander said, CNET said, etc. If these sources say burn in is still probable the test data proves them wrong. The owners of these 15 million OLEDs have used their TVs in every manner possible. The OLED owners have performed their crash tests and proven that burn in is extremely unlikely for 2018 and newer OLEDs for any kind of usage.

Rtings.com is a huge proponent of this misinformation. Their tests on outdated (2017) OLED TVs have brought their website a lot of advertising. I believe their marketing department is responsible for promoting their website with misleading information. From a legal point what they are saying is true, but very misleading. It is probable to get burn in. They just never define how probable. When they give permanent burn in a rating of 2 this is a bold face lie and misleads readers into thinking that burn in is far more prevalent than it actually is. It is all about the money.
 
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MattyBB

Active Member
The best data is test data. When you finish engineering a car, for instance, you do a crash test to find out how the car will perform in the event of a crash. Likewise, when you perform over 15 million tests on OLEDs by actual owners you can assume the TVs are reliable with respect to burn in.

On the 2017 and older models burn in was rare. There are many owners (the majority) that used their TVs in the same manner as those that experienced burn in and never noticed any burn in at all. This panel lottery suggest it could have been due to the manufacturing and not the engineering. It really doesn't matter what the cause was of burn in on 2017 and older TVs. When you perform longevity tests on over 15 million 2018 and newer OLEDs the sample size is large enough to make the results trustworthy.

There is no need to read why burn in could exist; engineering, manufacturing, well rtings.com said, Dodgexander said, CNET said, etc. If these sources say burn in is still probable the test data proves them wrong. The owners of these 15 million OLEDs have used their TVs in every manner possible. The OLED owners have performed their crash tests and proven that burn in is extremely unlikely for 2018 and newer OLEDs for any kind of usage.

Rtings.com is a huge proponent of this misinformation. Their tests on outdated (2017) OLED TVs have brought their website a lot of advertising. I believe their marketing department is responsible for promoting their website with misleading information. From a legal point what they are saying is true, but very misleading. It is probable to get burn in. They just never define how probable. When they give permanent burn in a rating of 2 this is a bold face lie and misleads readers into thinking that burn in is far more prevalent than it actually is. It is all about the money.
Hi @JustTheFacts, thanks for taking the time to write a good response.

I appreciate the point you are trying to make, as I'm sure @sebna does too. I hope it's true, since I own a 2020 LG OLED, so I have a vested interest. Moreover, I think it probably is true but it would be useful if you could cite your source, since myself and others would gain comfort from checking it out for ourselves and could share the knowledge with others once we see it's reliable info.

Therefore, please could you clarify where 15 million 2018-onwards OLED owners have responded to a survey or other type of feedback regarding burn-in? Please provide a link if possible. Thanks
 

JustTheFacts

Active Member
Hi @JustTheFacts, thanks for taking the time to write a good response.

I appreciate the point you are trying to make, as I'm sure @sebna does too. I hope it's true, since I own a 2020 LG OLED, so I have a vested interest. Moreover, I think it probably is true but it would be useful if you could cite your source, since myself and others would gain comfort from checking it out for ourselves and could share the knowledge with others once we see it's reliable info.

Therefore, please could you clarify where 15 million 2018-onwards OLED owners have responded to a survey or other type of feedback regarding burn-in? Please provide a link if possible. Thanks
It is the lack of feedback on 2018 and newer OLEDs that I am referring to. The only scientific data I know of is Consumer Reports in the USA. They have collected data from their members on 200,000 TVs. They don't mention burn in when they review OLED TVs. GadgetObsessed did a survey on AVForums that showed a 35% failure rate on certain OLEDs for years 2017 and previous, but this certainly wasn't scientific (you can input 4 votes and change your votes daily). When I asked Adam of rtings.com how many people reported burn in he told me they didn't keep this data just that there were people that reported burn in. This is why ratings says possible. They don’t have a clue as to how probable or they do know that it is highly improbable and they just mention burn in every time they talk about OLEDs for marketing. There are reports on social media of OLED owners experiencing burn in on 2017 and older OLEDs. People are vocal on social media when they experience burn in; complaints are the overwhelming majority on OLED burn in forums. Because over 15 million OLEDS have been sold since 2018 and the reports of actual cases has drastically reduced on social media I come to the conclusion that this is reliable data. You have to make your own decision. I personally watch my OLED with no precautions and no fear.

Consumer Reports in the USA is the best scientific data with an adequate sample size. Because OLED burn in wasn't prevalent in their sample size they don't mention it.

Hope this was helpful and now you have some knowledge you can share with others.
 
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JustTheFacts

Active Member
Hi @JustTheFacts, thanks for taking the time to write a good response.

I appreciate the point you are trying to make, as I'm sure @sebna does too. I hope it's true, since I own a 2020 LG OLED, so I have a vested interest. Moreover, I think it probably is true but it would be useful if you could cite your source, since myself and others would gain comfort from checking it out for ourselves and could share the knowledge with others once we see it's reliable info.

Therefore, please could you clarify where 15 million 2018-onwards OLED owners have responded to a survey or other type of feedback regarding burn-in? Please provide a link if possible. Thanks
If your interested in valuable data it would be beneficial to go to the OLED SCREEN BURN ( permanent image retention) thread and record the number of reports by date reported and OLED model. This would show a trend. You would also need to include the number of OLEDs sold for that particular year/model to really use this information. For instance if twice as many OLEDs are sold in 2018 than 2017 you would expect the failure rate to double.

Some people on AVForums say that we haven't had enough time for newer OLEDs to fail. A chart like this would help understand that statement, since you could look at how long after 2016 and 2017 OLEDs were manufactured they started to see reports of burn in on social media and you would expect the same time thread for 2018 and newer OLEDs.

Good project for someone with spare time.
 
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