tv linked to amp for hard of hearing

spunik

Standard Member
Hi
My wife is hard of hearing and has to watch tv listenening through headphones via a Goodmans Delta 800a amp. The problem is when listening to a film or programme with dialogue and music the music drowns out the speech. Is there any way of reducing the volume of the music without reducing the volume of the speech?
regards
David
 
Last edited:

bosque

Distinguished Member
If this can be bought the main drawback might be the expense. You could try ringing these people:

Action on Hearing UK
Contact us
Information Line

Got a question or comment? Our friendly helpline team are waiting for your call - we offer free confidential and impartial information on a whole range of subjects relating to deafness, hearing loss and tinnitus.

Telephone 0808 808 0123 (freephone)
Textphone 0808 808 9000 (freephone)

But they probably won't have a clue about a technical query like yours and one which would benefit millions or people who find the same headphone problem as your wife ! I think someone on AV Forums might know, hope they are able to reply :lease:
 

Mark_a

Well-known Member
Not a cheap option, but I'd suggest trying a pair of proper surround sound headphones instead of the normal stereo. This would allow you to boost up the centre channel, where most of the dialogue is, in relation to the other channels where the music's likely to be coming from.

Regards

Mark
 

spunik

Standard Member
Thanks for the quick reply. I omitted to say my wife is using Ipod earphones and not the big headphones as because she is only small she finds the larger headphones uncomfortable and heavy.
regards
David
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
When you say listening to the Tv via the Goodmans amp do you mean the TVs internal tuner or do you have a Sky or cable box connected to the amp?
Do you have the same problem if the headphones are plugged into the TVs headphone socket...assuming it has one?
 

bosque

Distinguished Member
It's a common problem for people who are hard of hearing.

In the 70s/80s I had an amp which had a gadget to let you cut the music and let you only hear the voice. Aren't these available now ?
 

spunik

Standard Member
Hi Jacee
Sorry I have obviously missed a lot of information from my question.
I am using the amp via a Skye box. If I use the sockets in the tv it cuts out the sound from the tv speakers so I can't hear anything. I will try the earphones plugged into the tv.
Thanks for taking the trouble to reply. I don't know how to reply to comments direct.
regards david
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
Cutting only the music is quite hard, but cutting the vocals is easy. I think this is what Bosque actually had. Basically, you can isolate a kill a mono (vocal) signal and leave the stereo (music) pretty much intact, but doing this the other way around is hard.

Part of the issue is the way the ear behaves. As you become older and / or your hearing starts to suffer, you lose the ability to discern different sounds clearly. My 41 year old ears have been roundly knackered through being a professional sound engineer for 20 years and I cannot understand what the kids are saying if the room is a bit noisy, but my wife has no problem at all. Apparently they are not mumbling...

Solution? A tricky one, but a small tone control to allow you to boost the treble frequencies would help with intelligibility. Some TVs / amps have a "night" mode that reduces the loud passages and boosts the quieter ones to give a consistent output. This might also help, as you could probably run the headphones louder overall. You cold try a small mixer or an old graphic equaliser, as this will have more bands of control as well.

Better headphones will also help. Cheap headphones are often engineered to boost the bass and more musical frequencies over those required for speech, so maybe look at a pair of "IEMs", as these will be just as light, but will seal into the ear better and will also sound more natural.
 

Wild Weasel

Distinguished Member
Perhaps use an AV surround amplifier & speakers. You could then adjust the volume on the central speaker (used for dialogue) independently of the other speakers (used for music, effects and everything else).

It would need to be a Dolby or DTS surround source of course, but that's most films on DVD, VHS and many broadcast on SKY.
 

spunik

Standard Member
Thank you
Unfortunately for my wife to hear any speakers the volume would have to so high the neighbours would be complaining
David
 

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