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TV Broadcastable

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by Jim Giles, Jun 6, 2004.

  1. Jim Giles

    Jim Giles
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    I'm shopping for a camcorder that I can make recordings that I can then turn over to TV stations as commercials. Please advise. Thank you.
     
  2. klr10

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    BBC use a lot of Sony PD150's or the newer 170's. You could probably get away with a Canon XL1 or an XL1s. Obviously there are far more expensive options, but you'll probably find a PD150 for a couple of grand.
     
  3. Jim Giles

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    Can a TV station take a DVD recording that I make with my camcorder and broadcast it?
     
  4. Duncan Craig

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    UK networks only accept Commercials in 16:9 anamorphic on DigiBeta, at 10hours TC, and of course within ITC broadcast specs and once they have been cleared by the BACC. Plus every network has it's own quirky requirements for lineup and timing. Don't forget the audio can't go over 6PPM.

    Whether footage shot on MiniDV is acceptable, is unlikely unless very well shot, the networks would generally fail it on tech review. I have had footage originated on DigiBeta and edited in a DV colourspace, then layed off the Digi and it passed, but it was heavily layered so the images were purposely masked and blurred. It's more tricky with VX2000/2100, PD150/170 as they are not true widescreen cameras are would need resizing, losing even more vertical resolution.


    I make commercials, hence have to deal with this stuff every day.



    Duncan.
     
  5. Jim Giles

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    What about AMERICA'S FUNNIEST HOME VIDEOS? http://www.museum.tv/ETV/A/htmlA/americasfun/americasfun.htm

    Those were clearly shot with VHS camcorders? What about those jets flying into the twin towers? That film was clearly shot by amateurs, tourists?

    My cable company has said they will accept VHS or Beta and prefer Beta. It would seem that a DVD would be vastly superior to either VHS or Beta.

    Thank you.
     
  6. Duncan Craig

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    A DVD is vastly inferior to BetaSP, let alone DigiBeta. BetaSP is analogue and therefore would blow MPEG2 out of the water....

    Anyway I guess you are in the States, something you should have mentioned as this is mainly a UK forum. I'm sure you local network would accept any format. UK network generally have higher standards as they tend to be fewer but much larger.

    If you were in the UK you would have to supply on DigiBeta.
     
  7. Duncan Craig

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    Is Americas funniest a Commercial, No.
    Was the Twin Towers a Commercial, No.

    IIRC You asked about commercials, Also it's worth mentioning you have to get permission from the broadcaster in the UK and mention the fact on the tech report sheets when using amateur footage on TV. That however is for TV programmes. Very different from commercials, the standards are generally much higher. I don't know where you are in the world, but if you want a commercial on a little local cable network then there are probably no rules/regulations at all. Contact them directly and ask.

    However as previous stated any commercial shown in the UK on a major network (ITV, C4, C5) and every satellite channel will insist on DigiBeta widescreen, a few will want 16:9 LB and some 14:9 LB, the odd local cable station (I think there are some in the UK ? - London and Hull probably) may have their own ideas of what constitutes broadcast quality!

    Don't forget to have text on-screen at the correct legal height and up for the required amount of time as specified in the ITC guidelines.
     
  8. Jim Giles

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    I live in Jackson, Mississippi.

    Thank you very much for the information. It's still hard to believe that a DVD cannot be broadcast in the UK. Is all of your Europe this way?

    Additionally, I would be saving the DVD recording to an avi or mpeg file. Would that make any difference? I am speaking of a cable television broadcast. Would American TV networks not be able to broadcast it? I thought those home videos and filming of the jets flying into the twin towers were shot by amateurs, i.e., with hand held camcorders?

    Obviously, I'm worse than an amateur and I appreciate the technical information.
     
  9. Duncan Craig

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    Of course some TV shows use amateur footage for programmes, but commercials are different, in the UK anyway. I'm not saying a DVD cannot be broadcast, but it is not an accepted delivery standard for commercials or programmes.

    I would personally offer the network a DV tape of your final edit, DVD is heavily compressed, so would be inferior to DV for example.

    Also DVD has no timecode, so that's a major no-no for any broadcaster.
     
  10. Jim Giles

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    I spoke with my cable company this morning and they do accept DVD and they can convert it to their format.

    The technician suggested I save the video as a .mov file but could use .avi or mpeg also. He said Quicktime was a higher resolution, i.e., .mov.

    When you say "DV tape" you mean something like .avi, .wmv, .mov, .mpg etc., right?

    As to timecode, I wonder if that is embedded in .avi, .mov, etc.?

    In any event the cable company can convert my DVD. I'm just trying to understand as much as possible to maximize the quality.

    Thank you.
     
  11. Duncan Craig

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    The technician suggested I save the video as a .mov file but could use .avi or mpeg also. He said Quicktime was a higher resolution, i.e., .mov.

    I suspect the technician is suggesting you send him a data file on DVD, not DVD video, which is compressed MPEG video. Companies can take high quality quicktime files from disc and lay them off to tape..

    PS. DV tape means exactly that, a MiniDV or DVCam tape.....
     

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