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Tutorial: AV Receivers and Amps Auto EQ Set up

Stuart Wright

AVForums Founder
Staff member
Home cinema expert Neil Davidson explains the set up process for auto EQ systems like Audyssey.

We hope you enjoy this production from the AVForums team. Please reply with your comments.
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Sebastalona

Distinguished Member
Very interesting video, gleaned a few tips.

However, could you suggest an alternative mount for the mic if you do not have a microphone stand (which won't be detrimental to the set up results).

Cheers
 

boxrick

Prominent Member
Very interesting video, gleaned a few tips.

However, could you suggest an alternative mount for the mic if you do not have a microphone stand (which won't be detrimental to the set up results).

Cheers

I often use my camera tripod... whether it is any good who knows but it works reasonably well ( certainly better than cushons etc ! )
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
A mic stand or tripod are your best bets for holding the mic. Each approach will cost you about a tenner to source a tripod or mic stand. The difference between good measurements and those that are not done correctly can make or break the auto EQ results.
 

Stuart Wright

AVForums Founder
Staff member
I tried with a tipod but couldn't get it into the right position over the chair. As Phil says, it's worth a tenner for a mic stand.
 

iqofafish

Established Member
Well I learnt something new thanks to that tutorial, thanks very much :thumbsup:
Always used to sit my mic on top of the rear part of the sofa but I'll be doing an Auto Cal with the mic away from there in future!
One thing that I've wondered regarding the term "seating position". Do you place the mic where the centre of your head would be or in the middle of the said seating area? I sit on one site of a two seater sofa so I've always tending to try and put the mic where my nose is but at ear height.

Am I just been too precise with the location?
 

Pecker

Distinguished Member
Any links to a decent and cheap mic stand?

If you know any secondary school teachers, most music departments have numerous microphone stands hanging around not being used.

Good video, this. I learned a lot about microphone positioning...time to get the mic stand out again.

Steve W
 
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spocksbeard

Established Member
The Audyssey system in my Onkyo TX-SR307 allows for 3 measurements to be taken, with the manual saying to take the measurements at different seating locations, at least 1 meter apart. I only have one seating location (my bed) as my setup is in my bedroom. Should I measure the same seating position 3 times (as the manual would suggest) or measure the seating position as position 1 then measure either side as positions 2 and 3 (as the video would suggest)?

My problem with the video's method is that the 307 doesn't know where in the room, and in relation to position 1, positions 2 and 3 are, and I wouldn't want it to correct for a position I will never be in while reducing its effect at the seating position. The few room correction solution for pro studio monitors that I have seen (KRK's being the one that springs to mind) seem to be very specific about where the test mic should be positioned and in which order it should be positioned there, to obtain the best results, which makes sense as the algorithms have been designed to work best with results from those positions. The method of "put it at your first listening position and then anywhere else around it to build up a picture" just doesn't seem right in my head.

This post isn't meant to knock the tutorial in any way, the thought just popped into my head while watching and I'd like to get other people's opinions.
 
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GrahamMG

Prominent Member
Hi.

I think the point about mic positioning may have been misunderstood.

The first mic position of any calibration method with Audyessy etc. is always the main seated position as this position is the one where the EQ works out distance and levels etc. The others need to be ideally no more than 3 feet from that first position. The calibration calculations then average out the measurements and get a map of the room so it knows what to EQ for. So in your case the first measurement is where you normally sit and the others around 3 feet to each side, or if you do change seating position, to roughly where you might also put your head. Remember to keep at least 6 inches or more from any seat back or other similar vertical surface and never ever measure close to a wall. keep the measurment area sensible and you will get a wider sweetspot up to the limits of your system.
For info, 3 measurements are a bare minimum, any device that offers 6 is better but for really good results 12-16 are quite common in high quality systems, some I deal with have 32..... Proper pro stuff will have an array of mics and a mic patch panel so you get an average of them all which is very useful in multiseat home theatres etc. but then the EQ that goes with it is rather more involved!!!

Hope that answers your question?
 

Pecker

Distinguished Member
Hi.

I think the point about mic positioning may have been misunderstood.

The first mic position of any calibration method with Audyessy etc. is always the main seated position as this position is the one where the EQ works out distance and levels etc. The others need to be ideally no more than 3 feet from that first position. The calibration calculations then average out the measurements and get a map of the room so it knows what to EQ for. So in your case the first measurement is where you normally sit and the others around 3 feet to each side, or if you do change seating position, to roughly where you might also put your head. Remember to keep at least 6 inches or more from any seat back or other similar vertical surface and never ever measure close to a wall. keep the measurment area sensible and you will get a wider sweetspot up to the limits of your system.
For info, 3 measurements are a bare minimum, any device that offers 6 is better but for really good results 12-16 are quite common in high quality systems, some I deal with have 32..... Proper pro stuff will have an array of mics and a mic patch panel so you get an average of them all which is very useful in multiseat home theatres etc. but then the EQ that goes with it is rather more involved!!!

Hope that answers your question?

In a room where there's almost always only one or two of you what would you do?

Steve W
 

GrahamMG

Prominent Member
I can only generalise as I have not seen your room, seating positions, speaker placement or available EQ kit but basically if you draw a circle that encompasses the seating positions with the centre point in the exact centre of the seating positions and place the mic there for the first reading and keep within the circle for the others, it is almost certain to give you some reasonable results. Keep in mind the "do nots" in the previous post though....
Oh and don't actually draw a circle on the floor, the wife might not appreciate it :rotfl:
 

Advocate

Established Member
I've just got a Yamaha RX-V1065 and that only allows for one reading to be taken. Is that enough?
 

GrahamMG

Prominent Member
I've just got a Yamaha RX-V1065 and that only allows for one reading to be taken. Is that enough?

Short answer is No.... One reading is never enough to do anything worthwhile.

Mind you its better than nothing......Assuming it actually does something positive, give it a go and if it comes up with daft readings forget it and just use it as is and do the usual setup (distance, level etc.) the old fashioned way.....
 

MJeeves

Prominent Member
Hi guys. Great video.

I have two questions...

Firstly, I have the Audessey mic (with my Denon 4310) and a cheap but effective microphone stand (similar to the one in the video). But... where can I get an "adapter" that holds the microphone onto the stand like the one in the video? Thank you! :smashin:

Secondly, is it advisable to have the microphone stand "in the way" of the signals? I notice in the video that Neil is using the mic stand "between" the mic and the speakers? Won't this effect the accuracy of the signals and measurements? Please advise. Thank you guys! :thumbsup:
 

GrahamMG

Prominent Member
Hi guys. Great video.

I have two questions...

Firstly, I have the Audessey mic (with my Denon 4310) and a cheap but effective microphone stand (similar to the one in the video). But... where can I get an "adapter" that holds the microphone onto the stand like the one in the video? Thank you! :smashin:

Secondly, is it advisable to have the microphone stand "in the way" of the signals? I notice in the video that Neil is using the mic stand "between" the mic and the speakers? Won't this effect the accuracy of the signals and measurements? Please advise. Thank you guys! :thumbsup:

The mic supplied with Audyessy enabled Denon and such like is a very basic, simple affair with I recall a camera mount thread (1/4" probably), so obtain an adaptor that converts the 5/8" or whatever thread your mic stand has to the standard camera thread format and it will probably fit (check first!!!), suitable sources for this stuff are the likes of StudioSpares etc. or simply use a camera stand which you can usually sit directly on the seat of a settee and adjust the height to suit.

You will see that the mic capsule is quite a bit above the mic stand pole/boom, the stand boom will be angled up slightly so as the actual stand is not a factor in the measurement. It certainly isn't anything that a "giveaway" mic and basic Audyessy application within a 4310 will need to wory about. Have fun.
 

MJeeves

Prominent Member
The mic supplied with Audyessy enabled Denon and such like is a very basic, simple affair with I recall a camera mount thread (1/4" probably), so obtain an adaptor that converts the 5/8" or whatever thread your mic stand has to the standard camera thread format and it will probably fit (check first!!!), suitable sources for this stuff are the likes of StudioSpares etc. or simply use a camera stand which you can usually sit directly on the seat of a settee and adjust the height to suit.

You will see that the mic capsule is quite a bit above the mic stand pole/boom, the stand boom will be angled up slightly so as the actual stand is not a factor in the measurement. It certainly isn't anything that a "giveaway" mic and basic Audyessy application within a 4310 will need to wory about. Have fun.

Thanks Graham, but I'm really looking after one of those adapters that "swivels" or moves and holds the microphone in place (like the one mounted on the mic stand that Neil is using). Where can you get them? ANyone know? Neil? :confused:
 

GrahamMG

Prominent Member
The Denon mic is what I call an Effel Tower design and therefore cannot be used with a standard mic stand clip. They are designed to be bolted to a camera stand. Remember the thing has to be pointing vertical anyway so the camera stand is perfect for that....

Proper mics (like the type you see at concerts etc.) use proper mic stands as my one in the video shows.

The only real way you may get a flexible mount for a denon mic is to use a "goose neck" with the appropriate adaptor at both ends (one for the 5/8" mic stand, the other for the base of the denon mic). They can also be found in the studiospares website.
IMHO all this is overcomplicating and costing money not wisely spent on a denon mic.....
 

kartal

Standard Member
Seriously is putting the mic on your head acceptable ? I have always used this method and I have been happy with the results but the video had me wondering if I could get better results using a stand.

Funny but true, best things in life are free !!
 

GrahamMG

Prominent Member
Seriously is putting the mic on your head acceptable ? I have always used this method and I have been happy with the results but the video had me wondering if I could get better results using a stand.

Funny but true, best things in life are free !!


No it isn't.....:lesson::facepalm:
You need something that does not move, mind you if you have photo's I can dine out for months showing them to people:rotfl::rotfl:

I am sure someone is having an early April fools joke here.:lease:

Mind you the measurements from these devices are so rudimentary it might not make any difference but trust me using a proper measuring system would show up such folly instantly...
 

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