Turning speakers on their side

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by adriandg, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. adriandg

    adriandg
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    I wa looking at getting a pair of Tannot Mercury F1 Custom speakers and I want to fit them in to a recess space in my kitchen. It looks as if the recess is just too small to fit them in upright. There is however room to fit them in on there side. What I was wondering would this detract from the quality of the sound?

    Cheers for any help
     
  2. Member 96948

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    It does make a difference, but unless you're going to sit in your kitchen to do some critical listening, I very much doubt you'd notice anything what-so-ever.

    Russell
     
  3. aVarkatzas

    aVarkatzas
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    I'm probably not the best person to answer this, depending on how audiophilic you are, but I have 2 of my speakers on their sides, just by my TV. I've not noticed one bit of quality degradation myself, still perfect and it's been about 6 months since I had them set up like this.
     
  4. THE_FORCE

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    adrian look at it from your point of view - wouldn't you rather be lying down than standing up ?;)
     
  5. paulmapp8306

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    I dont think it makes any difference. I record music (both in studios and at home) and its common practice to have the monitor speakers lying down - tweeters on the outside, bass drivers in the inside.

    Many engineers think you actually get a better reproduction because all the sound is generated on the same level (preferable at ear height).
     
  6. THE_FORCE

    THE_FORCE
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    Very true Paul as regards to nearfields. I always thought NS10's looked better on their sides anyways !:D
     
  7. DelsFan

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    "It does make a difference, but unless you're going to sit in your kitchen to do some critical listening, I very much doubt you'd notice anything what-so-ever."

    Agreed. You will at least have nearly "full-range" sound in your kitchen. I'd suggest putting the tweeters towards the center and the woofers towards the outside, but trying it each way would be dead simple.

    Good luck.
     
  8. Member 96948

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    Because your ears are aligned in the horizontal plane, the narrowest source of sound will provide the most accurate horizontal spacial information and that would require the speaker's drivers being aligned vertically.

    It doesn't matter too much as long as the speakers are angled accurately toward the listeners ears and the correct distance relationship twixt ear and drivers is maintained although your stereo imaging will be worse. However, as you move side to side you will be changing the relative distance not just between the speakers, but the angle of the listening axis relative to each speakers drivers. This is an issue.

    The speakers crossover is designed to integrate the two drivers smoothly when listened to normally with the tweeter at, or pointing at ear height, with the speaker aligned vertically. If you decide to stand up, or lie down one driver will now be further away than the other, so you introduce combing, which is destructive interference caused by frequencies being out of step with each other. The result is a number of severe dips in the response. As you tend to sit at one constant height for music listening, this is generally a non issue. Any side to side movement, just results in a gentle rolling off of the extreme treble due to the tweeters increasing directionally at increasing frequencies.

    But, if you lie a speaker on it's side (and incidentally centre speakers are a shocker for this) you simply transfer these vertical interference issues to the horizontal plane which, for someone seated but moving side to side, isn't very clever.

    Russell
     
  9. paulmapp8306

    paulmapp8306
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    I dont tend to move side to side when watching films, and even less when mixing/mastering my music !!

    That said I get the point, If your in the sweet spot it wont matter - but in a kitchen where your presumably moving it may be more of an issue.
     
  10. adriandg

    adriandg
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    With regard to speaker positioning. I've always been told that you should have your speakers toed in so that they cross at the point of listening to give you the best stereo image. But that is if you are going to be sat still in one place. My question is - and it has been touched on here earlier - in an environment such as the kitchen where you are going to be moving around constantly, what is the best way to position speakers to get the best sound?

    Cheers
     
  11. Member 96948

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    The best way to get the best sound out of the speakers would be to take them out of the kitchen.:D

    The proliferation of hard, reflective surfaces in a kitchen means such minutiae as speaker orientation just don't make enough of a difference to be much of a consideration. Go in there and clap your hands. I bet it sounds a lot more lively than when you do the same in your normal listening space, or at least it should do.

    On the aside of speaker toe in; Not all speakers are designed to be toed in, just as some are 'designed' to require quite extreme amounts. For most speakers, there's no hard and fast rule as it is dependent on striking a balance between taming early reflections from the side wall and restricting the stereo image width.

    Russell
     
  12. DelsFan

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    "and I want to fit [the speakers] in to a recess space in my kitchen"

    Is this space anywhere near ear level, or is it closer to the ceiling? If it is near the ceiling, will you tilt the speakers?

    I wonder if there is any way to get superior sound in your kitchen.
    For sure, there are two things you can do:
    - You can use (either cheap or expensive) speakers that reproduce music over a decent frequency range (200 Hz to 18,000 Hz is crap, normally, but it would be a massive improvement over a tinny radio or television speaker).
    - And, you can do this with superior quality electronics and speakers instead of cheap ones.

    I did the first half of this in my Mom's kitchen with a $69 speaker and a $39 amplifier and it is terrific (in a relative sense).

    http://www.avforums.com/forums/8793476-post6.html

    Could the sound be better? Sure, for $600 the sound quality could be improved! But just having any speaker that covers the mids and some of the lows is a great improvement, and is mostly listenable.

    Good luck!
     

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