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Trouble with sleeping...

kayzee

Established Member
Hi guys. I've always had a problem with sleeping, in that, if anyone else is around, I cannot sleep at all. I've not had much chance to actually sleep all night with girlfriends as my mum doesn't allow it lol... but even still, when I have, I cannot sleep at all, just lay there awake all night.

I even went on holiday with a girlfriend last year, and it took me 2-3 days before I actually got any sleep in. I never stay over mates houses because I know the same will happen. In august I was on holiday in Corfu and sharing a room was the worst thing about it! I was there for 7 nights, and in total I got about 12 hours sleep :rolleyes: I was managing around 2-3 hours per night in the end as I got into a routine of putting my headphones on really low so I could almost forget anyone else is there...

Even when I'm sleeping on my own however, on average it makes me around an hour to get to sleep from my head hitting the pillow. I've taken some advice online, such as I do exercise in my day, but not within 6 hours of actually going to bed, I turn off my music earlier, although I can't help going directly from PC to bed! The main reason for this thread is that I have a weekend away in Cardiff coming up... and the only rooms my mate could book where double ones, so I have to share with a mate.

I'm really anxious about this as I know it's another two days of no sleep coming up! :( my mate said he'll take a blow up bed for my mate as he doesn't care, but I know, that in reality it's not gonna make any difference. I've tried sleeping pills in the past and they've made no difference, but...

I also find it really hard to swallow pills lol, I'm a nightmare! Do you think going the doctors, they could suggest anything? It's so daunting to know I have 15 hours+ of laying there awake coming up :thumbsdow thanks for reading...
 

rd9124

Established Member
It would appear that your anxiety about the whole thing is the reason you can't sleep. If you can sleep fine on your own but not with others there, then obviously it's a psychological problem. Ok that may sound like it doesn't help you much but you should look at it as good news - there's nothing physically wrong and crucially, it is possible to change the way you think. I'm not sure if you should seek help from your doctor - this is impacting your life so maybe you should. In the meantime try not to worry and remember you body is set up to look after itself, sleep is a natural part of that and your body will self regulate and get as much sleep as you need to function.

I hope that's been of some help.
Ryan
 

DVD-Man

Distinguished Member
Going from the PC to bed is a bad idea, I can't sleep after a browse or 360 session so I need to watch 30mins of a DVD or tv to kinda switch off.

You don't actually say if you feeel tired, are you?

Liam
 

Iccz

Distinguished Member
Going from the PC to bed is a bad idea, I can't sleep after a browse or 360 session so I need to watch 30mins of a DVD or tv to kinda switch off.

I always go straight to bed from my laptop, during the evening I turn the brightness right down and have dark colour schemes applied which helps reduce the impact it has on my eyes.
I've been doing this for years and never really had any problems as I go to bed whenever I get tired (usually around 1-2am).


As the other poster said it sounds a lot like anxiety, but I would go to the Dr about it, you might be able to get something to help and also a professional diagnosis. Problems with sleep are quite common and it's a good idea to see a professional about these.
 

FZR400RRSP

Banned
I taught myself a 'trick' that gets me off to sleep, in any scenario.
If I'm struggling, due to stress or whatever, I force myself to think of the same situation.
For me, it's taking my motorbike around Knockhill race circuit.:rotfl:
Something I've done thousands of times and it relaxes me.
I rarely make it far around my imaginary lap before....:boring:
You just have to figure one out for yourself, always use the same one and concentrate on it.
It's not rocket science, it's just forcing your mind to get off the anxiety and relax.
I suppose it's almost like self-hypnosis.
 

Iccz

Distinguished Member
I taught myself a 'trick' that gets me off to sleep, in any scenario.
If I'm struggling, due to stress or whatever, I force myself to think of the same situation.
For me, it's taking my motorbike around Knockhill race circuit.:rotfl:
Something I've done thousands of times and it relaxes me.
I rarely make it far around my imaginary lap before....:boring:
You just have to figure one out for yourself, always use the same one and concentrate on it.
It's not rocket science, it's just forcing your mind to get off the anxiety and relax.
I suppose it's almost like self-hypnosis.

Sometimes anxiety isn't that easy to counter though, it's very much different to coping with stress, and for some people the amount of concentration and brain activity going on trying to make them go to sleep will keep them awake.
That said picturing yourself in your room/your bed with nobody around and convincing yourself of this could help, if it were possible to do so over the anxiety.
 

ukaudiophile

Established Member
Hi,

I've been something of an insominiac since I was around 15 / 16, I'm 39 now and still only a little better.

The first thing I'd advise is to not worry about it, the anxiety of not sleeping will often keep you awake more than anything else. Once I'd learned that trick and actually learned to listen to what my body was telling me, I found I would get all the sleep I needed, which turns out to be not as much as many others need. Your body is setup to essentially 'shutdown' when it needs to, so I find if I can't sleep I watch TV, read or simply go browse the web (hence the number of postings on this forum in the early hours). It is not uncommon for me to be going to sleep in the summer with the sounds of the birds waking up and the sky actually brightening.

At one point for around 12 months when I was in my early 20's I abandoned sleeping in the bedroom and slept on the sofa downstairs with the big screen TV, video and satellite receiver. It may seem odd, but it worked for me and I've had no health related problems in the years that followed.

Whilst it may seem very tough at the moment (and believe me I know how difficult it is to control these anxieties however irrational they may seem to the outside world) once you've learnt to accept that this is your body simply saying it's not ready to shut down yet, and then do soemthing else until it is, you'll find you sleep much better.

Good luck with finding a solution to this problem.

Best wishes,

Dave
 

Urien Rheged

Distinguished Member
Last edited:

sniffer66

Distinguished Member
I taught myself a 'trick' that gets me off to sleep, in any scenario.
If I'm struggling, due to stress or whatever, I force myself to think of the same situation.
For me, it's taking my motorbike around Knockhill race circuit.:rotfl:
Something I've done thousands of times and it relaxes me.
I rarely make it far around my imaginary lap before....:boring:
You just have to figure one out for yourself, always use the same one and concentrate on it.
It's not rocket science, it's just forcing your mind to get off the anxiety and relax.
I suppose it's almost like self-hypnosis.

I use a similar idea but mine is riding a white horse bareback along a sandy beach. Works for me every time
 

kayzee

Established Member
Thanks. Maybe I should see a doctor, if he could refer me to a specialist.

I do actually feel tired, I usually head off to bed around 1am, I can be yawning and in some cases find it hard to keep my eyes open! But as soon as I get into bed, it changes, and I'm wide awake :rolleyes: the thing is, ultimately, I'm not even that bothered, as I do get to sleep eventually. It's as I said, mainly with other people around that I really hate the situation. It's even like when I hear other people get to sleep, I'm jealous!

Perhaps it is that feeling and me really trying to get to sleep, which is stopping me... straight from PC to bed might not be ideal, but this certainly isn't the case on holidays and this weekend away I'm going on.

I understand people saying not to worry because the body will control how much sleep you need, fair enough, I've learnt I can work with pretty much naff all sleep! But it's so horrible doing nothing for hours but laying there worrying... maybe I'll just take my PSP and play that all night :suicide:
 

BAN5HEE

Prominent Member
Try some herbal remedies. I have 5-HTP when I feel a bit stressed and my mind can't rest. It just relaxes you and you don't even know when you fall asleep you just do and wake up refreshed in the morning. Get it from Holland and Barret. 2 capsules usualy do the trick.

Holland and Barrett - 5HTP Category Page
 

hopeless

Prominent Member
Chamomile tea helps, though I don't like the taste. Also valerian tea is a very good natural sedative. Warm milk might also help and does a hot bath.

Try reading a book instead of watching the telly, playing xbox etc before bed

Sometimes when I have difficulty sleeping I listen to a little Gregorian chant, and I'm out in minutes

Goodluck
 

shodan

Distinguished Member
Main thing is that whatever prevents you from sleeping well will be a matter specific to you however you should know that you are not alone and many of us have trouble sleeping. Booze helps me sleep but it isn't a good sleep and I wake up feeling like poo. Mostly though I just have to wait until I'm tired enough to sleep or go to bed and lay there watching stuff on telly or laptop in bed till I drop off. Nothing stimulating you understand...
 

DPinBucks

Distinguished Member
Firstly, try going to bed earlier. If, as you say, you tend to lie awake for an hour anyway, it might be that the stress of being tired, plus the anxiety, is keeping you awake. It's certainly true that you can be too tired to drop off.

Secondly, try a hot drink such as chocolate before bed. Don't eat too late; go to bed a little hungry. No alcohol after 10pm.

If you have a radio or MP3 player, try listening to talk rather than music. I'm not being facetious, but Radio 4 is a good nightcap.

There's no way to tell you to stop worrying, but the biggest source of insomnia is an active mind, often simple anxiety.

As others have said, if you feel OK during the day, you're getting enough sleep, so that's one thing less to worry about.
 
D

Deleted member 293381

Guest
Hi kayzee

I only need about 4 - 5 hours of sleep a day and learnt to live with it many years ago.

I usually make a cup of tea and drink it while on the internet for about an hour or so, then catch up on a bit of interesting work, finally do some reading before it's time to wake the missus up with a cup of tea.

The critical thing is not to think deeply at that time. Do simple things and potter about. Thinking deeply at that hour leads to anxiety (the blues).

The problem is there is no problem and once you realise that then everything slips into place.

Like many people I just don't need to sleep as long as what is considered 'normal'.

Alan
 

kayzee

Established Member
Try some herbal remedies. I have 5-HTP when I feel a bit stressed and my mind can't rest. It just relaxes you and you don't even know when you fall asleep you just do and wake up refreshed in the morning. Get it from Holland and Barret. 2 capsules usualy do the trick.

Holland and Barrett - 5HTP Category Page

Are they easy to swallow? Because as I said I find it hard taking pills etc. as well!

I definitely find it easier to sleep if I come home after a few drinks! But, this makes no difference if I'm coming back to a place where other people are. A lot of the suggestions seem very good so thanks guys, I'll give them a try. At the same time though, they seem definitely more something for me to try at home rather than being around other people when I sleep!
 

MikeTV

Distinguished Member
I used to be a bit of an irregular sleeper, but I found a cure. For me it was to get up at a set time every day, and go to bed only when sleepy. It sounds too simple, but it really works. And now I sleep almost as soon as my head hits the pillow. So, never fight the urge to go to bed (whatever is on telly!), because that will just make you feel jet-lagged the next day, and get a regular pattern going. You can be a bit more flexible once you've solved the main problem. Another trick is to dim the lighting in the evening, which really works, because the brain interprets this as meaning sleep-time. And avoid snoozing, and lie-ins in the morning. What you are looking for is 7-8 hours of quality sleep. And once the pattern is established, you'll feel sleepy in the evenings at the right time, and wide awake in the mornings. That horrible feeling of not wanting to get up in the mornings will disappear. Also, avoid napping in the daytime. And let the light into the room in the mornings - this will help you wake up naturally (obviously harder in the winter). Lastly, avoid all the obvious things like caffeine, and intense mental activities, at night time.

Once your sleep is sorted, it won't matter who you are sharing a room with. I've stayed in dorms with 12 other snorers and slept like a baby.
 

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